kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Hegarty on Advertising

Availability: Ready to download

What makes a great idea? How does one best pitch to a prospective client? What effect will new technology have on advertising? Written by one of the world’s leading advertising creatives, Hegarty on Advertising contains over four decades of wisdom and insight from the man behind hugely effective and influential campaigns for brands such as Levi Strauss, Audi, and Unilever. What makes a great idea? How does one best pitch to a prospective client? What effect will new technology have on advertising? Written by one of the world’s leading advertising creatives, Hegarty on Advertising contains over four decades of wisdom and insight from the man behind hugely effective and influential campaigns for brands such as Levi Strauss, Audi, and Unilever. The book is both an advertising credo and a brilliantly entertaining memoir. The first part offers John Hegarty’s personal insights and advice on the advertising business: Ideas, Brands, The Agency, Briefs, Pitching, Storytelling, and Technology. In the second part, Hegarty talks about his own career and experiences, from his early days working with Charles Saatchi to the founding of Bartle Bogle Hegarty (BBH) in 1982 and its rise to global renown with offices in London, New York, Singapore, Shanghai, Mumbai, and Sao Paulo.


Compare
kode adsense disini

What makes a great idea? How does one best pitch to a prospective client? What effect will new technology have on advertising? Written by one of the world’s leading advertising creatives, Hegarty on Advertising contains over four decades of wisdom and insight from the man behind hugely effective and influential campaigns for brands such as Levi Strauss, Audi, and Unilever. What makes a great idea? How does one best pitch to a prospective client? What effect will new technology have on advertising? Written by one of the world’s leading advertising creatives, Hegarty on Advertising contains over four decades of wisdom and insight from the man behind hugely effective and influential campaigns for brands such as Levi Strauss, Audi, and Unilever. The book is both an advertising credo and a brilliantly entertaining memoir. The first part offers John Hegarty’s personal insights and advice on the advertising business: Ideas, Brands, The Agency, Briefs, Pitching, Storytelling, and Technology. In the second part, Hegarty talks about his own career and experiences, from his early days working with Charles Saatchi to the founding of Bartle Bogle Hegarty (BBH) in 1982 and its rise to global renown with offices in London, New York, Singapore, Shanghai, Mumbai, and Sao Paulo.

30 review for Hegarty on Advertising

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alina Stoica

    Really cool book. Don't expect to tell you very practical things about advertising, though. It's a great window into how the advertising world developed in the UK and all the changes this guy's seen in his life regarding the field. A lot about entrepreneurship, taking risks, sticking with your beliefs and taking bold action. And full of case studies about great branding projects, the philosophy behind them and why they made an impact.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrés Watanabe

    Interesante libro que todo publicista en crecimiento debe leer. Te cuenta un poco la historia de la publicidad y como esta evoluciona, y como toda industria, quien tiene la idea innovadora es quien brilla, este es el caso de BBH, la agencia del autor. En un breve libro, te cuenta cómo creó la filosofía de su agencia y qué decisiones tomó para impulsarla. Como publicista me sentí en los pies del autor, y me identifiqué con muchos puntos. Lo recomiendo y leeré el que sigue.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dipra Lahiri

    Thoughts about advertising, past present and future by the acclaimed marketing guru. The great advertising that he created for Audi and Levi's amongst others makes the book insightful and interesting.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Achim

    'You'll find exciting, funny, knowledgeable and stimulating people. It's an industry made of entrepreneurs. It's also an industry that will prepare you for almost any other business: it's fast moving, challenging, smart and inquisitive, built on the need for competitive advantage.' Hegarty on Advertising is a book about our industry, that is englightening, insightful and fun to read. John Hegarty, one of the three founders of BBH, describes his view on the advertising industry and tells his pers 'You'll find exciting, funny, knowledgeable and stimulating people. It's an industry made of entrepreneurs. It's also an industry that will prepare you for almost any other business: it's fast moving, challenging, smart and inquisitive, built on the need for competitive advantage.' Hegarty on Advertising is a book about our industry, that is englightening, insightful and fun to read. John Hegarty, one of the three founders of BBH, describes his view on the advertising industry and tells his personal story of how he arrived at where he and his agency are today. I highly recommend this book, not only to those who work in advertising, but also to anyone who wants to get an understanding of this industry and it's challenges. There are basically two parts in this book. Part one is about Hegarty's believes and opinions on how advertising should work, how it changed over the last years, and how it needs to evolve as a discipline. The chapters are on general topics like ideas, brands and audiences, agencies, the creative director, clients, briefs, pitches, on storytelling and Hegarty's view on the role of technology. For anyone working in this industry, there shouldn't be too many surprises there, nothing unheard of. There are even some very universal phrases that might be new to someone from outside the industry but seem redundant to people working in advertising today. Still, some definitions and statements are fun to read and always have this kind of 'Absolutely!' (life coach) effect. Sentences like 'Creativity isn't an occupation, it's a pre-occupation' or 'Do interesting things and interesting things will happen to you' or this famous Bernbach quote: 'a principle isn't a principle until it cost you money.' He is talking about principles a lot, about BBH principles like the principle of of 'no creative pitches'. There are also some nice definitions to use for your next presentation. For example: 'The best definition of a brand I ever heard is this. A brand is the most valuable piece of real estate in the world: a corner of someone's mind.' The second part is the more interesting biographical part. I am sure, this is an insightful read for everyone working in the advertising industry. In a funny and witty way, Hegarty describes how he started in the London advertising industry in the 60s, when he started at Benton & Bowles, then Cramer Saatchi (Charles Saatchis first agency or creative consultancy as this interesting business model was called), Hegarty was then part of the founding team of Saatchi & Saatchi, where he spent a couple of years and watched first hand, how a big agency brand was created. When TBWA opened it's office in London in 1973, where Hegarty was part of the executive team. The historical perspective on the strategic decisions of the agency networks of that time are definitely worth the read. The idea behind TBWA for instance, was to build the first pan-European agency anticipating the development of the European Union as the driving economic and cultural force of the future. This was definitely new to me. In 1981 he then founded BBH, together with long time TBWA business partners Nigel Bogle and John Bartle. The personal stories and anecdotes of how they started their own agency provide great insights and are just fun to read. He describes how the industry changed over the years, how they (also with some luck) managed to win Audi and Levi's among their first three clients and how they were able to go global with their so called micro network. Of course, Hegarty is also celebrating some of the work he and his colleagues produced over the last three decades. BBH definitelty left their mark on culture and created some classical pieces of advertising like Levi's Odyssey or the TV commercial creek. While reading the book I found myself researching on YouTube to see some of the commercials again. In summary, what I liked most about Hegarty on Advertising, is the fact, that the book is celebrating our industry. Advertising is not necessarily blessed with the greatest reputation and the biggest trust. In fact, advertising professionals are always ranked among the least trusted professions (just after politicians and used car salesmen). And even the people working in this industry have enough to complain about all the time. In this book, John Hegarty reminds us, that this is the most exciting time to be in advertising and marketing. 'Advertising is far more than just a communications industry. It's a problem-solving industry that also teaches you about life, how it encourages you to focus your thinking and produce something of genuine value. Why? Because that will make the advertising task so much easier. You're now equipped with a unique set of insights and experiences across a broad range of markets, allowing you to bring clarity and inspiration to anything you wish to produce.' Amen.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Diverting enough and, crucially, short ride through Hegarty's feelings about advertising and his career. Hegarty might produce magic visually but this is a parade of truisms and that isn't helped by the formatting. Large bold paragraphs really only flag how middle of the road some of it is. You do get the impression that Hegarty is a lively figure in the flesh who knows what he's doing. In print, he gives advice like "read the economist and recite bits back to your client so they think you're sm Diverting enough and, crucially, short ride through Hegarty's feelings about advertising and his career. Hegarty might produce magic visually but this is a parade of truisms and that isn't helped by the formatting. Large bold paragraphs really only flag how middle of the road some of it is. You do get the impression that Hegarty is a lively figure in the flesh who knows what he's doing. In print, he gives advice like "read the economist and recite bits back to your client so they think you're smart" and "come up with ideas that are true to the brand you are advertising". His professional capability shines through best in passages following the format [Brand has problem which they have tried to address] / [Hegarty and colleagues reposition problem] / [Description of resulting creative with anecdote about The Making Of]. It's here he lapses into more readable prose and fairly clear descriptions. The rest of the book feels much more He's also a massive Tory, he makes that pretty plain so I took against him. There are a few insights and a couple of amusing anecdotes, but sadly nothing that really jumps out of the page. The most diverting pages for me were about the early days of Saatchi & Saatchi, and the management of the trade press. Quite enjoyed a dig he took at one of his former employees (not that I have a clue who it is) but the bitterness is only on show the one time. Finally, my copy had like 9 or 10 typos and errors that I was surprised a proofreader hadn't caught.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Hamid

    'Not for younger people in the advertising industry'? Tosh. If you're looking for a book to tell you exactly how to run a brilliant campaign right now, then this isn't for you. Go somewhere else. This is a short, autobiographical account of Hegarty's time in advertising dotted all over the place with anecdotes about the people he's worked with, the pitches he's attended and the work that's succeeded and failed *and why*. And it is valuable. There are truisms that you can pick up from anywhere, b 'Not for younger people in the advertising industry'? Tosh. If you're looking for a book to tell you exactly how to run a brilliant campaign right now, then this isn't for you. Go somewhere else. This is a short, autobiographical account of Hegarty's time in advertising dotted all over the place with anecdotes about the people he's worked with, the pitches he's attended and the work that's succeeded and failed *and why*. And it is valuable. There are truisms that you can pick up from anywhere, but it's his insight into the nature of creativity and client psychology that are really valuable. If you're working in the industry, it's worth a read for an insight into Hegarty's experience. If you're not working in the industry it's worth reading because, despite occasions of insufferable smugness, Hegarty can obviously write yell. It makes reading this a blast. Take from it what you will. My favourite insight is on Polaroid post-BBH work. 'Polaroid could have been at the heart of [social networking]. But sadly they couldn't get away from the idea of instant film, instead of instant experiences.' He's hitting at the heart of the problem with most social-related marketing right there.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kamana Mhatre

    This book gives a learning experience for people who want to make their career into advertising and specially account planning and creative department. My only disappointment is that this book is divided into two parts, the first part consists of mostly theory knowledge, of course examples are also given to support it but this makes the first part a bit boring to read. The second part is filled with stories, examples and his experiences and his growth into advertising industry which is inspirati This book gives a learning experience for people who want to make their career into advertising and specially account planning and creative department. My only disappointment is that this book is divided into two parts, the first part consists of mostly theory knowledge, of course examples are also given to support it but this makes the first part a bit boring to read. The second part is filled with stories, examples and his experiences and his growth into advertising industry which is inspirational. 5 stars for second part.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    The book doesn't actually offer much in terms of the technical skills necessary in being a successful advertiser. However, that shouldn't deter readers from thoroughly enjoying this book. Hegarty gives a god detail of his life in the advertising industry, starting from the very start to being the legendary advertising figure that he is. Hegarty's story telling style and insights make reader feels like they're listening to a great master sharing his contemplative journey.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Enjoyed this book very much! Wasn't able to put it down after I started reading it. Gives you a great insight of how a bunch of British Mad Men built up BBH from a scratch. Contains many interesting and funny anecdotes as well as life lessons. It's not a book that explains how advertising works, but what it's like to work in advertising. Has many words of wisdom - especially on ideas - that can help you on your career, whether you work in advertising or elsewhere.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    I like two things out of books like these - juicy tidbits of trivia you didn't know, or actual, useful information that will improve my career. It delivered moderately on the former and minimally on the latter. But, then, while I do consider myself mildly creative, I've never gotten much use from creative tips from other people. BBH is a great shop, though, and it was fun to read its history. I loved that part. And this very much makes me hope Bogle writes a book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Naveen

    A lot of the case studies provided by John Hegarty bears fruit to that particular period in the Advertising industry. Most of the practices would not be relevant to the current times. Nevertheless, the practices of Saatchi and BBH sheds a shining light to what newcomers in the industry can learn from. Relaxing read, something you can finish on your tube ride back home.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Honza Marcinek

    This book is not about creativity. This is about philosophy in advertising and how to treat with people you work with. Interesting part is about why to be a creative director and about pitching. For people who are starting a career in advertising is required reading. ;)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Darran Mclaughlin

    A quick, enjoyable read about the advertising industry from one of it's most distinguished practitioners. It isn't an especially excellent book but it is easy and diverting. I read it because I have become more interested in advertising since getting into Mad Men.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    What is the most inspiring in this book are the examples of the author's work - you can literally trace the evolution of advertising and enjoy the best campaigns in action and what results they achieved. P.S. Keep YouTube close while reading ;)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ilias

    Not your typical advertising book and that's a good thing. Hegarty's experience and pockets of wisdom transcend to anyone with even the slightest interest in advertising and its relationship with culture and society, and he manages to give us one important lesson: it's all about the ideas.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Paul Martin

    Interesting for its autobiographical content but lacking on useful insights for the younger advertisers amongst us. Worth adding to your collection if only to hear how 'BBH' got started from the 'H'.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michael D'hooge

    Glimpse of a bit of magic.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Vijay P

    excellent. an interesting perspective from someone in the industry. a must read for anyone wanting to know how the advertising world works..

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    http://vulpeslibris.wordpress.com/201...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Charles Knox

    By far the best book i've read about the creative industry in a long time.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Well written fascinating read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ulas Bardak

    Fun, if a bit slow, coverage of the advertising industry's history complete with many funny/interesting anecdotes.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Fabian

    Onevenwichtig maar er staan wel leuke dingen in.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Martin Bihl

    to read my review, please visit http://theagencyreview.wordpress.com/...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sergio GRANDE

    Very quotable. Very boring. I expected a whole lot more from one of the very few (if not the only one) still active great men of advertising. Nicely written for an art director.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Conrado

    exceptional

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mansi Laus Laus

  28. 4 out of 5

    Yoli

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bernatom

  30. 4 out of 5

    Leopold Ajami

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.