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Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising

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Gmail, Facebook, AirBnb, Evernote. A new generation of multibillion dollar brands have been built without spending a dime on traditional marketing techniques. No press releases, no PR firm, and no billboards in Times Square. It wasn’t luck that took them from tiny start-ups to massive success. They have a new strategy, called Growth Hacking. And it works. In this e-special, Gmail, Facebook, AirBnb, Evernote. A new generation of multibillion dollar brands have been built without spending a dime on traditional marketing techniques. No press releases, no PR firm, and no billboards in Times Square. It wasn’t luck that took them from tiny start-ups to massive success. They have a new strategy, called Growth Hacking. And it works. In this e-special, bestselling author Ryan Holiday shows how the marketing game has changed forever. He explains the growth hacker mindset and provides a new set of rules—critical information whether you’re an aspiring marketer, an entrepreneur, or a Fortune 500 senior executive.


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Gmail, Facebook, AirBnb, Evernote. A new generation of multibillion dollar brands have been built without spending a dime on traditional marketing techniques. No press releases, no PR firm, and no billboards in Times Square. It wasn’t luck that took them from tiny start-ups to massive success. They have a new strategy, called Growth Hacking. And it works. In this e-special, Gmail, Facebook, AirBnb, Evernote. A new generation of multibillion dollar brands have been built without spending a dime on traditional marketing techniques. No press releases, no PR firm, and no billboards in Times Square. It wasn’t luck that took them from tiny start-ups to massive success. They have a new strategy, called Growth Hacking. And it works. In this e-special, bestselling author Ryan Holiday shows how the marketing game has changed forever. He explains the growth hacker mindset and provides a new set of rules—critical information whether you’re an aspiring marketer, an entrepreneur, or a Fortune 500 senior executive.

30 review for Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Though I found the Ryan Holiday’s Growth Hacker thought provoking and had several good ideas in it, I also found it frustrating. My point of frustration may not really be Mr. Holiday fault, but just the same it was my main point of contention with the book. I have spent my career with multiple Business-to-Business (B2B) product companies. In most of these companies the product was complicated and had many parts and aspects to it (including software and hardware components). Though clearly there ar Though I found the Ryan Holiday’s Growth Hacker thought provoking and had several good ideas in it, I also found it frustrating. My point of frustration may not really be Mr. Holiday fault, but just the same it was my main point of contention with the book. I have spent my career with multiple Business-to-Business (B2B) product companies. In most of these companies the product was complicated and had many parts and aspects to it (including software and hardware components). Though clearly there are several points made in this book that directly apply to this type of B2B industry, it talks about the world of marketing and business like B2B does not exist. No examples in the book relate to a B2B case. The book never even acknowledges the existence of such a market, but instead implies that the “secrets” disclosed in the book should apply to all. I appreciate that the author may have no experience with B2B. Also, even if the author did have B2B experience writing about the topic might be nauseating for 99% of his readers. Talking about how to market a sewer pump station is not as interesting to the masse as the story of how Hotmail go started. My pet peeve is when people read a book like this often act like they have had a god like transformation as it relates how to market every product in the world (including the B2B case). You ask them what they learned and they talk about the power of Internet marketing and how Dropbox exploded after giving away storage space to people who encouraged their friends to try Dropbox. You then ask how can we apply that to our B2B business and have no idea (I will acknowledge that the exercise of trying to apply these examples to the B2B case can be a positive one, but there are clear differences in the consumers as well). You ask them how what they learned can be applied to B2B business, and you are met with chirping sounds). Maybe the best way to explain what I personally got out of the book (form my admittedly myopic B2B perspective) is for me to explain how I perceive the differences between B2B vs consumer marketing as it relates to the topics of this book. B2B DIFFERENCES 1. Typically the customer not spending their own money. 2. Buyers often influenced by direct contact with sellers company staff, who may spend months (or years) developing a relationship with the buyer and assisting them in their search for the best product solution for their organization. 3. Very little (or no) cool factor when making purchase decision. 4. Cost of ownership may be more important than initial upfront price. 5. “Keeping my job” is a significant factor in purchase. Avoiding buying wrong product is a very big deal, because a mistake could lead to loss of employment. This risk avoidance may lead to buying the most established brand or product (as the old saying goes “no one was ever fired for buying IBM”). 6. Price points may be very high. 7. Possible that the product is a system and thus cannot be bought online. 8. Complicated products can be tricky to compare. 9. Normally a very small target audience. You do not have to find the right company or organization to sell to, but the correct department and maybe even the right person in that department. Thus the big challenge is not identifying the correct customer company’s, but find the consumer inside though companies. To proactively find the “right” person often takes old fashion detective work by a sales person. Using the Internet for this small group to find you can be very tricky (unless you can find a common place all these “right” people hang out online). 10. The narrowness of the target group can make finding the correct and common Ad words difficult (however if you can find the right common word, then they are likely to be relatively in-expensive on a per click basis by the very nature that they are rare). 11. For the more complicated products, the consumer may be willing to spend a great deal of time researching the best product to purchase (possible months or more). The consumer can justify this investment in research because they are being paid to do this research by their employer. This can lead to a situation where the buyer or consumer will become aware of your company or brand from their own research, but not that likely that it will result in your closing the sale. 12. Normally the buyers associate buying process as “work” vs “play”, so less likely interesting in reading or bumping into information about your products on a lazy Saturday morning Internet surfing session. SIMILARTIES 1. The Growth Hacker suggestion to not rely on old and tired marketing approaches certainly applies to B2B (however this is really just a generality). 2. Buyers are influenced by like buyers. Thus leveraging industry groups using techniques from this book do directly apply. 3. Positioning your company as the “expert” on the product area can be advantageous. Using the some of the Growth Hacker “thinking” on this point does apply. 4. High quality blogging, webinars and information write ups can all help position your company as the expert on the topic. Of course using the Internet in this position endeavor is often the best approach. 5. The buyers are sophisticated and may hate being “pitched” (especially when they start reading your information thinking they are going to learn something, but instead find a sappy marketing story about how great the sellers company and product are. Thus a “hack” marketing write up can have the opposite to the intended impact. 6. Since many of the customers are experts in the field of your product, it makes creating informative pieces more difficult. Writing about the benefits of your new tennis racket is going to be much easier to explain why your new hydraulic valve will save you money over ten years as compared with the other vales on the market. 7. Often due to the complexity of the product and your desire to educate the educated you can fall into writing at a level that assumes your readers (or listeners) know more than they do. However, there are always new comers in the buyers organizations, so you have to always create some kind of lead or defining a basis for your write up (not to leave all newbies in the dark). When you ask high technical people in the seller company to write such pieces, they can often fall into a lot of jargon that loses most readers. 8. Do to conflicting nature of having to write about complex products but use simple clean English, it if often a significant challenge to find a single individual who has all the skills required accomplish these tasks. A pure “writer” or marketing person with little product background often simply do not have enough knowledge to and have them pull off a quality write-up, blog or webinar. You end up having to using your best people (likely engineers or product managers) who happen to also be solid writer to do this work. The problem with this approach is the opportunity cost of their time dedicated to such projects is likely very high expensive. Using the approach of a professional writer interviewing or working with one of these experts to create the piece sounds good in theory, but in reality the expert will tell you that 9 times out of 10, they spend more time helping the writer and re-writing the document then they would have if they just wrote it their self (so using the writer as an editor may make more sense, but still expensive). 9. As described in the book, using old expensive marketing methods can be very ineffective (and at the very least with no clear way to measure results it is hard to know if there is a good return on the investment or not). Most B2B marketing of complex products includes a relationship between the two parties that may have taken years to build. Though this can apply to certain consumer purchases (maybe your local car dealer) it often does not. The important nuance along with the narrow and relatively small target audience for many B2B companies make books like the Growth Hacker miss the mark for people looking for help with the B2B business plans. As I started at the start of my comments (rant), my issues with this book are not so much general content, but about the sweeping generalizations that imply their words apply to all business (when they do not).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Standard

    This book came off as a collection of self-promotional blog posts. About 1/3 of the book is spent trying to justify its own existence by talking up how you can forget everything you knew about traditional marketing. Where "traditional marketing" seems to consist mainly of running billboard or TV spots with expensive celebrities. The book's narrow-minded view of marketing really discredits what "non-growth hackers" actually do, while nebulously outlining what growth hackers actually do. A positiv This book came off as a collection of self-promotional blog posts. About 1/3 of the book is spent trying to justify its own existence by talking up how you can forget everything you knew about traditional marketing. Where "traditional marketing" seems to consist mainly of running billboard or TV spots with expensive celebrities. The book's narrow-minded view of marketing really discredits what "non-growth hackers" actually do, while nebulously outlining what growth hackers actually do. A positive here is the book can serve as a collection of examples of what "hacks" other big name web app companies have done to boost subscriber growth. Unfortunately not much insight was attached and the examples were mainly informational, rather than illustrative of some underlying principles. I hate to be this harsh, but it really did feel like a hastily put together work to capitalize on the recent buzz around "growth hacking".

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brad Feld

    I figured I’d read the cannon on Holiday so this was next. If you don’t know what “growth hacking” means, this is a good intro. But if you do, this is a waste of time.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kirtida Gautam

    The book is fine for a complete beginner. But it's quite at rookie level.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ola Olusoga

    Fantasy overview of what Growth hacking is, and how to apply it to your company. Dives into quick examples of how some of the top companies today applied growth hacker marketing tactics to their business. Points from the book: 1.) Growth Hacking Marketing isn't something you do at the end of a product, it's intertwined in all aspects of the creative process (design, engineering, business strategy). The days of taking the "hollywood" approach to marketing ( launching event, billboards, super bowl ad Fantasy overview of what Growth hacking is, and how to apply it to your company. Dives into quick examples of how some of the top companies today applied growth hacker marketing tactics to their business. Points from the book: 1.) Growth Hacking Marketing isn't something you do at the end of a product, it's intertwined in all aspects of the creative process (design, engineering, business strategy). The days of taking the "hollywood" approach to marketing ( launching event, billboards, super bowl ad) is over, now large audiences can be reached through creative tactics that can be measured. 2.) Product Market Fit The days of taking intrinsic guesses around "what the customer/audience wants" is over. Now you can launch an idea/Minimum viable product (MVP) and pivot based on customer feedback & data till you reach a viable "PMF". Company example given in the book "Airbnb". 3.) Finding your Growth Hack "You can't expect people to come to you; you have pull them in" Growth hacking is pulling customers in and you don't need the front page of NYT for that. Examine your market, and create tactics to pull them in based on their interests & needs. Examples given "Dropbox" free space once you watch the intro video and share on facebook with your friends, or Uber offering free rides at SXSW (it's target demo) 4.) Going Viral Virality is achievable. "Once you have decided that you will not be paying to get in front of every potential customer (via paid advertisements or publicity), then you've accepted you must reach them some other way." If you want customers to share your "product" you need to give them a reason. You can't hope someone shares a boring product demo, or brand video that has nothing to do with them. If it's a video, is it inspiring?, moving?, directed at a specific audience? Example company given "Groupon"+ "Living Social", they offered an incentives when you refer a friend, which in turn cause the viral factor. 5.)Retention and Optimization Your site can always be updated. There is always something to improve. Be like Twitter or Facebook, not like Myspace that stopped iterating (they died). Work on improving the flow. Track customer clicks, find pain points/bottle necks, review metrics and iterate till you see improvement in conversion, and lower bounce rates. Also if you have an email list of people who have been to your site, but haven't converted yet. Find ways to pull them back in, and convert. "The probability of selling to an existing customer is 60 to 70 percent, while to a new prospect it's just 5 to 20 percent"... "Retention trumps acquisition"

  6. 4 out of 5

    John Konrad

    As a blogger and early Digg superuser I've had a ringside seat to many growth hacking campaigns and I've even done a bit of growth hacking myself but... the problem with growth hacking is there are countless hacks and a myriad of strategies but little has ever been done to connect the dots. Some books have enumerated some of these strategies and others have focused on individual pieces of the growth puzzle but each makes growth hacking appear chaotic and disorganized. The truth is that growth ha As a blogger and early Digg superuser I've had a ringside seat to many growth hacking campaigns and I've even done a bit of growth hacking myself but... the problem with growth hacking is there are countless hacks and a myriad of strategies but little has ever been done to connect the dots. Some books have enumerated some of these strategies and others have focused on individual pieces of the growth puzzle but each makes growth hacking appear chaotic and disorganized. The truth is that growth hackers do thrive in chaos but, on a personal level, growth hackers (at least the ones I've met) are all masters of organization, systems and discipline. Ryan explores this dichotomy but, more importantly, he effectively distills the important lessons in a clear and concise manner. This book should be required reading for every marketing student and MBA but is essential, MUST READ, material for every entrepreneur, bootstrapper and creative genius. - John Konrad, Author of Fire on the Horizon: The Untold Story of the Gulf Oil Disaster.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Trang Ngo

    Chưa bao giờ đọc cái gì về growth hacking cả mặc dù đã nghe và nhìn thấy từ này rất nhiều lần và đã muốn tìm hiểu từ lâu. Chỉ biết growth hacking là cái gì đó liên quan đến startup. Xong tình cờ thấy cuốn này bìa bắt mắt lại liên quan tới marketing nên đọc thử. Cuốn này viết dễ hiểu và là một sự khởi đầu tốt với người mới làm quen như mình. Tác giả nhắc nhiều lần trong cuốn sách rằng đây không phải cuốn sách dạy cách làm mà là cuốn sách để thay đổi mindset của những người làm marketing truyền thố Chưa bao giờ đọc cái gì về growth hacking cả mặc dù đã nghe và nhìn thấy từ này rất nhiều lần và đã muốn tìm hiểu từ lâu. Chỉ biết growth hacking là cái gì đó liên quan đến startup. Xong tình cờ thấy cuốn này bìa bắt mắt lại liên quan tới marketing nên đọc thử. Cuốn này viết dễ hiểu và là một sự khởi đầu tốt với người mới làm quen như mình. Tác giả nhắc nhiều lần trong cuốn sách rằng đây không phải cuốn sách dạy cách làm mà là cuốn sách để thay đổi mindset của những người làm marketing truyền thống. Mindset mà cuốn sách nhắc tới chính là "growth hacker marketing", có thể hiểu là những cách marketing sáng tạo và tiết kiệm, gắn liền với sản phẩm, khi có một sản phẩm phù hợp với thị trường (product-market fit) Vậy growth hacker marketing gồm những bước thế nào? Bước 1: Xây dựng sản phẩm thật tốt bằng cách test và sửa đổi sản phẩm nhiều lần cho tới khi nó thật sự phù hợp với một nhóm khách hàng nhất định, tiếng anh gọi là "achieve product-market fit". Quan điểm của cuốn sách là mọi hoạt động marketing đều là vô nghĩa khi chưa có product-market fit. Bước 2: Xác định nhóm đối tượng để growth-hack, luôn là nhóm "early adopters", những người quan tâm đến sản phẩm mới và không tiếc tiền cho việc thử dùng những sản phẩm này. Nhóm này sau đó sẽ giúp công ty spread sản phẩm. Bước 3: Nghĩ ra các hoạt động sáng tạo để tạo viral cho sản phẩm. Bước này thì vô cùng, nhưng có một vài ví dụ về hotmail, dropbox, mailbox, gmail khá hay. Bước 4: Duy trì mối quan hệ với khách hàng để khách hàng quay lại sử dụng sản phẩm nhiều hơn. Cơ bản là vậy, đoạn cuối sách có rất nhiều gợi ý và các sách và blog để người đọc tìm hiểu thêm. --- Một vài ghi chép khác: -- Quy trình product-market fit và marketing ở sách này khác với một số sách khác mình đã đọc. Ở các sách khách thì đã market các sản phẩm tới nhóm innovators và early adopters từ lúc sản phẩm còn chưa hoàn thiện. Sách này thì nói là phải hoàn thiện đã xong mới market, tuy nhiên để hoàn thiện thì phải có users, vậy nhóm users này là ai? Đây là điểm thiếu logic của cuốn sách. -- Các ví dụ khá ít, quanh đi quẩn lại chỉ có hotmail, mailbox, gmail, dropbox. Và các tactics của công ty này chỉ là thêm các cách để người dùng hiện tại giới thiệu cho người dùng khác hoặc tạo sự thèm muốn chờ đợi. VD: *** gmail hồi xưa có invite only *** waiting list của mailbox *** p.s. message ở cuối tất cả các thư gửi qua hotmail, hoặc cách iphone ipad để chữ ký tự động là 'sent from my ipad'. *** dropbox thì tặng mb cho người dùng. Tuy ít nhưng thật ra mình thấy ví dụ cũng khá hay, mình có thể học hỏi.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Raafat

    فيسبوك وزينغا وغروبون وبينترست وغووغل ما دفعو ولا دولار للماركيتينغ. Growth Hacking عبارة عن 4 خطوات لازم تنعمل لأنو الماركيتينغ الحالي يلي عرفناه حالياً عم ينقرض ورح ياخد كل يلي عم يستعملوه متل التلفزيون واللوحات الإعلانية والجرايد والراديو. أول الكتاب حسيت هالشي مُبالغ فيه وهالطريقة بس بتنطبق عالمشاريع الأونلاين. بس وقت يحكي الكاتب أمثلة عن مشاريع عأرض الواقع. ووقت يحكيلك كيف نفّذ الـ Growth Hacking عالكتاب يلي بين إيديك هلأ وعم تقرؤوه. بتعرف انو الكوكب صار مكان كبير للإبداع وتحقيق كتير أحلام فيسبوك وزينغا وغروبون وبينترست وغووغل ما دفعو ولا دولار للماركيتينغ. Growth Hacking عبارة عن 4 خطوات لازم تنعمل لأنو الماركيتينغ الحالي يلي عرفناه حالياً عم ينقرض ورح ياخد كل يلي عم يستعملوه متل التلفزيون واللوحات الإعلانية والجرايد والراديو. أول الكتاب حسيت هالشي مُبالغ فيه وهالطريقة بس بتنطبق عالمشاريع الأونلاين. بس وقت يحكي الكاتب أمثلة عن مشاريع عأرض الواقع. ووقت يحكيلك كيف نفّذ الـ Growth Hacking عالكتاب يلي بين إيديك هلأ وعم تقرؤوه. بتعرف انو الكوكب صار مكان كبير للإبداع وتحقيق كتير أحلام إذا الواحد لعبها صح الكاتب Ryan Holiday عمرو 29 سنة وواحد من عباقرة الماركيتينغ بالعالم. أحييك مستر رايان على بساطتك بالسرد والصراحة

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Goldfarb

    It's gotten to the point where I simply do not miss a word Ryan Holiday writes--whether it's a Tweet, a blog post, or certainly a new book. I would have never expected his latest--a brief, cheap ($2.99), e-book-only work--to be such a game changer...if not a life changer. Before reading this, I didn't know the term "growth hacker," but now I can't imagine ever doing business without it. I suppose I'd always innately knew I needed growth hacking within the marketing for my own novels, but this is It's gotten to the point where I simply do not miss a word Ryan Holiday writes--whether it's a Tweet, a blog post, or certainly a new book. I would have never expected his latest--a brief, cheap ($2.99), e-book-only work--to be such a game changer...if not a life changer. Before reading this, I didn't know the term "growth hacker," but now I can't imagine ever doing business without it. I suppose I'd always innately knew I needed growth hacking within the marketing for my own novels, but this is the first book to truly crystallize those ideas in my mind. If you're a person who sells something, or has a message he wants spread, you'd be a fool to not devour this book. Written in Holiday's enjoyable, matter-of-fact style, you could have this book finished before lunchtime if you'd just quit wasting your time online reading Goodreads reviews.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Oleksandr Golovatyi

    A very short but useful book about new marketing rules, about sunset advertising on television and new ways of business promotion. ----------------------- Очень коротенькая но полезная книга про новые правила маркетинга, про закат рекламы по телевидению и новые пути продвижения бизнесса. I read this book on Scribd by Readlax Chrome Extension

  11. 5 out of 5

    Maciek Wilczyński

    Must-read position for traditional marketers and good compulsory read for start-up related people. The book presents the foundation, philosophy and key principles of growth hacking - the new way of attracting and maintaining clients in the long run. Few actionable tips, some great case studies. If you're looking for a book, which will tell you what to do, it's not the one. But if you're looking for a book, which will tell you how you should be thinking about marketing your product - go, run to t Must-read position for traditional marketers and good compulsory read for start-up related people. The book presents the foundation, philosophy and key principles of growth hacking - the new way of attracting and maintaining clients in the long run. Few actionable tips, some great case studies. If you're looking for a book, which will tell you what to do, it's not the one. But if you're looking for a book, which will tell you how you should be thinking about marketing your product - go, run to the closest book store or order it on Amazon. Also, full of very helpful positions and actionable URLs to blogs, conferences etc. which may boost your knowledge in the topic. I strongly recommend it!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Zahra

    Who is "growth hacker " ?? I'm highly interested in modern job descriptions my first impressions about this term is what is it like to be a growth hacker I mean we've seen a lot of non-traditional companies , personal blogs or accounts or even a random youtube video going viral .. so what's the secret ? Obviously a great marketing team of growth engineers working backstage to make this happen .. " A growth Hacker is someone who has thrown out the playbook of traditional marketing and replaced it wi Who is "growth hacker " ?? I'm highly interested in modern job descriptions my first impressions about this term is what is it like to be a growth hacker I mean we've seen a lot of non-traditional companies , personal blogs or accounts or even a random youtube video going viral .. so what's the secret ? Obviously a great marketing team of growth engineers working backstage to make this happen .. " A growth Hacker is someone who has thrown out the playbook of traditional marketing and replaced it with only what is testable , trackable and scalable , their tools are E-mails , pay-per-click ads , blogs and platforms APIs instead of commercials, publicity and money " Good informative content for anyone new to the concept of Growth-hacking but it's more like the author promoting to his career and personal thoughts , actually I'm a bit surprised about the fact that this was a bestseller book yet it doesn't have a clear vision or scientific review on growth hacking techniques but he showed a lot of case studies including instagram , Dropbox,Gmail strategies to hack the markets and get massive growing amounts of interested users .. Honestly I think that reading articles about growth hacking is more useful than reading this book .

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Munday

    I'm sure this book was valuable in 2013 - It was a little too basic for me in 2017. Yep, data driven is essential. But, let's come up with some amazing strategies for how to build off just calling out data as important.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Chang

    O autor é formado em marketing e trabalha nessa área há anos, e então ele se depara com empresas digitais, mais precisamente startups, em que ele percebe que o que se sabe sobre marketing não se aplica ao DropBox, Instagram, Pinterest, entre outros. O que o impressionou é que nenhuma das startups tinham o conceito de marketing (tradicional, pelo menos) e nem dinheiro. Sob o ponto de vista dele, as startups recriaram o marketing, que ele e outros autores chamam de growth hacking, por meio de ações O autor é formado em marketing e trabalha nessa área há anos, e então ele se depara com empresas digitais, mais precisamente startups, em que ele percebe que o que se sabe sobre marketing não se aplica ao DropBox, Instagram, Pinterest, entre outros. O que o impressionou é que nenhuma das startups tinham o conceito de marketing (tradicional, pelo menos) e nem dinheiro. Sob o ponto de vista dele, as startups recriaram o marketing, que ele e outros autores chamam de growth hacking, por meio de ações que tornaram o marketing tradicional irrelevante. Ele explica que o growth hacking é voltado para medição precisa, como o é o caso dos Analytics da vida, e que é um modo de pensar, e não uma ferramenta. O growth hacker é o hibrido daquela pessoa técnica que desenvolve o produto/serviço (o programdor), seguindo o padrão startup de ser (lean startup), com a marketeira que quer alcançar os consumidores. Porém o modo de se chegar a uma conclusão é por meio de testes A/B, landing pages, viralização etc. Já ouvi que marketing digital não existe, é apenas marketing. Eu sempre discordei e esse livro só agregou na minha argumentação. Marketing digital existe, sim. E eu posso dizer que ser growth hacker acontece tão naturalmente, que nem percebemos que estamos fazendo marketing. === por enquanto, somente em inglês ===

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nhung Pham

    Concepts and ideas used to define the Growth Hacker Marketing in this book are just a mixture of well-known approaches as Inbound Marketing and Integrated Marketing. Contemporary Mkt has rapidly and profoundly evolved since the rise of technology. It's absolutely not foolish as it was described in this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Wolfson

    This books packs a real punch in 56 pages. It gives you everything you need to know to adopt a growth-hacking mindset, which is the way marketing will be done exclusively in the future.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gabija

    Senos kartos rinkodarininkams bus labai naudinga. Mano atveju, daug kas jau buvo žinoma. Tačiau idėjù pasisėmiau, o nuo kai kuriù žiniù nupūčiau dulkes. Nebloga, greitai ir lengvai skaitoma, gerai sustrateguota ir parašyta aiškia, suprantama kalba. Labai patogu, kad yra terminù žodynėlis, kuris ne tik sausai paaiškina termino reikšmę, bet ir pateikia pavyzdžiú, ar išsamesnį paaiškinimà. Knyga ne stebuklas, tačiau tikrai Rekomenduočiau visiems, norinties išsigryninti internetinės rinkodaros ir ma Senos kartos rinkodarininkams bus labai naudinga. Mano atveju, daug kas jau buvo žinoma. Tačiau idėjù pasisėmiau, o nuo kai kuriù žiniù nupūčiau dulkes. Nebloga, greitai ir lengvai skaitoma, gerai sustrateguota ir parašyta aiškia, suprantama kalba. Labai patogu, kad yra terminù žodynėlis, kuris ne tik sausai paaiškina termino reikšmę, bet ir pateikia pavyzdžiú, ar išsamesnį paaiškinimà. Knyga ne stebuklas, tačiau tikrai Rekomenduočiau visiems, norinties išsigryninti internetinės rinkodaros ir marketingo žinias, susidėstyti viskà “į lentynėles”.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Abhijeet Jain

    A nice introduction about "growth hackers". The book is stuffed with numerous tactics used by top companies for the marketing, which obviously I loved. Who should read this book? If you want to know about growth hacking or you are just someone who wants to read about marketing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Aura Espitia Muñoz Cota

    Es un libro muy interesante y útil para cualquiera que esté emprendiendo o como parte de un equipo de mercadotecnia. Habla desde la experiencia y ofrece muchos recursos para seguir aprendiendo y poner en práctica.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Puga

    Ideas concisas y a lo que vamos. Necesario para los que trabajamos en digital, medios y usamos las redes sociales con frecuencia o como modo de vida.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ash

    I read this more some work related enlightenment, but it was stuff I pretty much knew already. At least it was quick.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ernest Junius

    Wake Up, Advertising A review of Growth Hacker Marketing Although the slogan “Advertising is Dead” has been proclaimed again and again by iconoclasts and innovators around the world since the beginning of the millennium, it might not be entirely true—especially in this country (Indonesia) where big companies are still taking advantage of oblivious citizens who are mostly still residing in rural areas away from civilisation and high-speed internet connection. To say advertising is dying is more acc Wake Up, Advertising A review of Growth Hacker Marketing Although the slogan “Advertising is Dead” has been proclaimed again and again by iconoclasts and innovators around the world since the beginning of the millennium, it might not be entirely true—especially in this country (Indonesia) where big companies are still taking advantage of oblivious citizens who are mostly still residing in rural areas away from civilisation and high-speed internet connection. To say advertising is dying is more accurate. I, however, prefer it best to call advertising is “less effective” (than it used to be). Growth Hacker Marketing by Ryan Holiday is talking about this exact phenomenon. Pioneered by startups the growth hacker phenomena has grown into a worldwide thing—it even has its own conventions, forums, groups, and discussions all over the net. It is the new thing of running (marketing) things: there is no more need of cosmic-scale marketing budgets for TV ads, glossy spread, full-page block in national newspapers, etc., you just need a bunch of growth hackers to run all your marketing needs and see your business proliferate in influence and numbers. Great. So is it that easy? No. The first thing, you need to know is what is Growth Hacker Marketing. “The end goal of every growth hacker is to build a self-perpetuating marketing machine that reaches millions by itself.” —Aaron Ginn So basically Growth Hacking is a mindset—not a toolkit—that combines marketing and engineering. Rather than doing traditional marketing like we all in big advertising agencies do, they do it differently by making their approach testable, trackable, and scalable. Rather than bombing the TV with pointless beautiful cinematic that runs for a minute for an X brand that viewers might not see anyway (because they switched the channel before the commercial reveals its benefactor), a growth hacker would develop something (most probably an app or a kooky Youtube video) that will grab their target audience attention and make them buy the product almost instantly and also make them the brand’s evangelists who will likely spread the love for the brand by talking it to their peers and writing about it in their blogs. But in order to do this, there are steps to do and obstacles to clear. First off, you need to make a wonderful product. In other words, a product so awesome people will talk endlessly about it (probably like Twinkies when it first came out, I don’t know), the author put Instagram as an example. Creating a great product is a marketing decision. That’s new isn’t it? Well, it had been mentioned before in Purple Cow by Seth Godin, but in case readers forget, yes, the product is marketing in itself. So if the product sucked, marketing efforts are pointless. Sounds familiar? Yes, just what we do every day in advertising agencies—trying to sell tired old products. After the great product phase, a growth hacker needs to learn from what the consumers think about the product (feedback, suggestions, etc.) and define what could be the best metric for growth. And after he figures that one out, he will need to make it go viral. And finally, he needs to continue make improvements and tweak the product to keep happy customers (cause it is stupid to invite the customers in just to kick them out, right?). What most satisfied readers (and the ones who expect a god-like transformation happening in their companies) would overlook from this is that to make this growth hacking happen a company needs to have the right, qualified people. And on top of that it will need a ridiculous amount of work and research. And also most growth hackers out there are usually skilled not just in marketing, but also engineering and programming. At this point I would like to say that one would need to prepare these kinds of people beforehand. And not to mention one needs to set up the connections he needs to make things happen—because plans are just plans until they actually pull off. Although growth hacking is just a mindset, it can be very tough to actually pull it off. But when it does, it can be very rewarding (big impact sans big spending). So if you believe the old way of advertising doesn’t work like it used to be anymore you might want to read this, although sadly I don’t think the tactics in this book aren’t applicable in big advertising agency environment, since big agencies are usually the servants of big clients with big, grand plans in their heads which usually involve big budgets for TV, radio, prints and all those ATL bullcrap that surely will go down the drain. But don’t get discouraged now. Why don’t just use it for your own good? Apply it to your own venture, and maybe things will work out better than you’d ever hope.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rajesh Math

    It is basically an overview of an overview.... not worth the time if you are seriously into the subject

  24. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    A growth hacker is a software or computer engineer leading another team of engineers for the purpose of marketing. The concept of a growth hacker (and the point of Ryan's book) is that 'coding and technical chops are now an essential part of being a great marketer' (from Andrew Chen who is referenced in the book). This was an alarming proposition for author Ryan Holiday as he is no engineer but is rather the VP of marketing of a large corporation (in addition to marketing for other well known cl A growth hacker is a software or computer engineer leading another team of engineers for the purpose of marketing. The concept of a growth hacker (and the point of Ryan's book) is that 'coding and technical chops are now an essential part of being a great marketer' (from Andrew Chen who is referenced in the book). This was an alarming proposition for author Ryan Holiday as he is no engineer but is rather the VP of marketing of a large corporation (in addition to marketing for other well known clients and being an author). The idea that you have to have technical chops to 'make it' in the future of marketing was scary for him...and fascinating. I feel like this short e-book was informative yet only mildly interesting. The main idea here is that to grow your product you need to continuously analyze the data so that you can continuously evolve the brand to fit the customer's demands. In order to execute such a task you must have the data. Thus, "a growth hacker doesn't see marketing as something one does, but rather as something one builds into the product itself". Examples of growth hacking in use: Groupon offering $10 coupons if you forward the link to a friend who purchases a Groupon; data sites who offer more data bytes of storage if you refer friend. Hotmail was one of the earliest examples of group hacking as they grew their email business by embedding the phrase "PS: I love you. Get your free email at Hotmail" at the end of every Hotmail email sent out thus wildly expanding the brand to the tune of a $400 million sale to Microsoft a few years later. Hence growth hacking is the vehicle for acquiring customers since users have to be pulled in (rather than bombarded with ads like traditional advertising). This is where the technical skills of programmers and engineers come into play because they are the ones who come up with the different concepts like using a website's API, figuring out how to share codes for the brand with other websites (a la Airbnb's engineers figuring out how to auto post the listings on Craigslist which was a no-no at the time), and even sharing data on sites like Bit Torrent to generate mass appeal ahead of a product launch. The limitations of such ideas as discussed would be for more traditional brands, or brands that aren't purely digital or always even digitally pushed. I feel like a lot of these ideas Ryan wrote about have been discussed before in various platforms and he just brings them together. Nonetheless for a 50 page e-book it may at least be worth a quick browse to see what's happening in the Silicon Valley world of marketing.

  25. 4 out of 5

    M.L. McIntosh

    I'm a complete and utter beginner. A total noob. I have no ratings, next to no followers, and no idea. All I have are some books I've written (a product) that I think are great, but are ill-suited to a traditional publishing market. I've spent my entire life in the medical sciences, from micro labs to emergency rooms, psych wards, residency... I can't fill out my taxes without help, you think I'm going to effectively market and indie sci fi novel? Goodnight. If you're like me, and I suspect some I'm a complete and utter beginner. A total noob. I have no ratings, next to no followers, and no idea. All I have are some books I've written (a product) that I think are great, but are ill-suited to a traditional publishing market. I've spent my entire life in the medical sciences, from micro labs to emergency rooms, psych wards, residency... I can't fill out my taxes without help, you think I'm going to effectively market and indie sci fi novel? Goodnight. If you're like me, and I suspect some of you trolling Goodreads are, you're frustrated, pissed, tired, broke, and running out of time in your life to make an impact with whatever product you think you've got to make humanity's collective day better. This book is not a how-to manual. Go to something more like "Your first 1000 copies" for that kind of work. This is a "Calm down and market on" memoiresque shoulder clap. Holiday basically takes all the self-defeatist things we've all said after our 100th Tweet has resulted in exactly 16 followers and says, "No. These other guys did it. Here's some of the reasons why they made it, and you're not. Now go change." The most helpful chapter, to me, came at the end when he describes his own book launch scenario. While I felt that Holiday and his client definitely got to "move up to the red tee" on a lot of points, it provided me, a total and utter newbie, some conceptual framework to just start with. I've already made several philosophical changes to the way I approach my two small business, and in one of them, I'm seeing results. You guys make fun of the TV ad, celebrity and billboard throw out spiel? Yeah, my company was seriously considering all of those things and could've sank ourselves financially in them out of ignorance. Now I'm rolling down the interstate laughing at my main competitor as I rack up more new leads, more followers, more views, and more likes. Oh yeah, and more income. Like I said, this is not a "How to" manual that's going to crack deep, dark secrets of how to make a million bucks tonight using Facebook, it's a "How to think" manual for people who have just suddenly been dumped into this career path, possibly mid-life, and need to do some neurological re-wiring. It's simple, it's optimistic. Some us need that.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Molly Looby

    An incredible read. Full of amazing tips. Well worth a read!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dipanshu Rawal

    Book Review in 5 sentences- 1. First step. Figuring out what people really want from your product. Because, even if your prototypes are bug-free and flawless, they'll fail if there's no actual demand for them. 2. Don't target everybody. Target early adopters, or those eager to try new things. Since most people won't become customers, it would be a massive waste of time and resources to try to reach them. 3. Retain your customers. Be oriented toward customer retention. Centre your marketing effort Book Review in 5 sentences- 1. First step. Figuring out what people really want from your product. Because, even if your prototypes are bug-free and flawless, they'll fail if there's no actual demand for them. 2. Don't target everybody. Target early adopters, or those eager to try new things. Since most people won't become customers, it would be a massive waste of time and resources to try to reach them. 3. Retain your customers. Be oriented toward customer retention. Centre your marketing efforts around it. You'll have to find the right metric to measure performance. 4. Reward adoption. Reward your users for learning how to use your product. If your product is not easy to use or easy to adopt, you'll frustrate your customers and eventually lose them. 5. Activate your audience. Find ways to make your product worth sharing. And don't forget to encourage sharing. For more reviews,visit- dipanshurawal.com/books

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    As someone who used to be in social media and who likes to stay current on the latest trends, applying them to my own current and future projects, I am always on the lookout for great, inspiring business books. Enter Ryan Holiday’s new book. Growth Hacker Marketing details Holiday’s strategies for ‘hacking’ business growth during the creative/production process and ways innovative companies (start-ups) have combined PR, Marketing and Advertising…Giving case studies presented in fact-filled conver As someone who used to be in social media and who likes to stay current on the latest trends, applying them to my own current and future projects, I am always on the lookout for great, inspiring business books. Enter Ryan Holiday’s new book. Growth Hacker Marketing details Holiday’s strategies for ‘hacking’ business growth during the creative/production process and ways innovative companies (start-ups) have combined PR, Marketing and Advertising…Giving case studies presented in fact-filled conversational style. This is a catalyst-type book, promoting a new mindset for most companies and a great way to think if you have an entrepreneurial mindset. It is an encouraging book to read if you are planning to set the world on fire with your particular product or service. The paperback is 111 pages, so it is slim, portable and definitely worth the price. While it could be read in one sitting, I recommend taking some time with the books 77 pages of content (with a glossary, FAQ and website links) to really digest the ideas presented within the book. I also recommend having a highlighter handy. I picked up a copy of this via Amazon prime, and you can pick this up at your favorite retailer. It’s also available as an ebook (the book’s original format).

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Overall, a good inspirational book with some cool examples of how to grow a business outside of conventional marketing and advertising channels. What's interesting to me is that "growth hacking" is really just "direct marketing" with a different name. At least that's what it seems like to me. Things like measuring conversion rates and RFM have been in the direct marketer's toolbox for decades. One thing that bugged me a little bit is a spot where Holiday uses "conversion rate" (percentage of prospe Overall, a good inspirational book with some cool examples of how to grow a business outside of conventional marketing and advertising channels. What's interesting to me is that "growth hacking" is really just "direct marketing" with a different name. At least that's what it seems like to me. Things like measuring conversion rates and RFM have been in the direct marketer's toolbox for decades. One thing that bugged me a little bit is a spot where Holiday uses "conversion rate" (percentage of prospects who become customers) to describe "stick rate" (percentage of customers who use the product and don't abandon or refund). Anyway, I enjoyed the book overall primarily for its examples, not because of any new earth-shattering insights.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maria Miaoulis

    Absolutely fascinating read! Advances in technology allow a message to spread like wildfire in this day and age. Ironically though, consumers are bombarded by so much "noise" that they either become desensitized to marketing efforts or fail to act on them. So how do you reach that elusive audience? Spend more money promoting the product and hope the efforts stick somewhere, anywhere, even if it's somewhat later down the road? Not anymore. Now, you hire a growth hacker, an individual who thinks o Absolutely fascinating read! Advances in technology allow a message to spread like wildfire in this day and age. Ironically though, consumers are bombarded by so much "noise" that they either become desensitized to marketing efforts or fail to act on them. So how do you reach that elusive audience? Spend more money promoting the product and hope the efforts stick somewhere, anywhere, even if it's somewhat later down the road? Not anymore. Now, you hire a growth hacker, an individual who thinks outside the box while operating close to the edge, someone who will draw in target buyers, bring attention to your product using limited resources and metrics and have word spread to others. Promotion is no longer a guessing game, provided you know your industry well and change your mindset.

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