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Diary

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Misty Wilmot has had it. Once a promising young artist, she’s now stuck on an island ruined by tourism, drinking too much and working as a waitress in a hotel. Her husband, a contractor, is in a coma after a suicide attempt, but that doesn’t stop his clients from threatening Misty with lawsuits over a series of vile messages they’ve found on the walls of houses he remodele Misty Wilmot has had it. Once a promising young artist, she’s now stuck on an island ruined by tourism, drinking too much and working as a waitress in a hotel. Her husband, a contractor, is in a coma after a suicide attempt, but that doesn’t stop his clients from threatening Misty with lawsuits over a series of vile messages they’ve found on the walls of houses he remodeled. Suddenly, though, Misty finds her artistic talent returning as she begins a period of compulsive painting. Inspired but confused by this burst of creativity, she soon finds herself a pawn in a larger conspiracy that threatens to cost hundreds of lives. What unfolds is a dark, hilarious story from America’s most inventive nihilist, and Palahniuk’s most impressive work to date.


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Misty Wilmot has had it. Once a promising young artist, she’s now stuck on an island ruined by tourism, drinking too much and working as a waitress in a hotel. Her husband, a contractor, is in a coma after a suicide attempt, but that doesn’t stop his clients from threatening Misty with lawsuits over a series of vile messages they’ve found on the walls of houses he remodele Misty Wilmot has had it. Once a promising young artist, she’s now stuck on an island ruined by tourism, drinking too much and working as a waitress in a hotel. Her husband, a contractor, is in a coma after a suicide attempt, but that doesn’t stop his clients from threatening Misty with lawsuits over a series of vile messages they’ve found on the walls of houses he remodeled. Suddenly, though, Misty finds her artistic talent returning as she begins a period of compulsive painting. Inspired but confused by this burst of creativity, she soon finds herself a pawn in a larger conspiracy that threatens to cost hundreds of lives. What unfolds is a dark, hilarious story from America’s most inventive nihilist, and Palahniuk’s most impressive work to date.

30 review for Diary

  1. 5 out of 5

    Airiz C

    Liking Chuck Palahniuk's books must be akin to a Fear Factor challenge for most readers. And sometimes I can't help but wonder, what if THAT is what exactly Palahniuk wants the readers to feel about his works? Feel challenged by it, dislike it, feel disgusted or insulted by it--all of these by hurling the naked truths of human nature to the face of people in the harshest possible way? My first Palahniuk book is Choke, and I was sort of culture shocked when I read it--a multitude of f-bombs being Liking Chuck Palahniuk's books must be akin to a Fear Factor challenge for most readers. And sometimes I can't help but wonder, what if THAT is what exactly Palahniuk wants the readers to feel about his works? Feel challenged by it, dislike it, feel disgusted or insulted by it--all of these by hurling the naked truths of human nature to the face of people in the harshest possible way? My first Palahniuk book is Choke, and I was sort of culture shocked when I read it--a multitude of f-bombs being dropped from heavenly heights, sexually explicit situations, bitter but truthful ruminations about life. Completely different from the books I've been reading--and that's saying something because I usually go for the "dark side" of literature. I thought Choke would already build my literary panoply when it comes to his works. But I was wrong--Diary might not lie on the opposite side of the spectrum when leveled with his other works, but it's a new account of insane despair that I'm not really used to. Diary is a story about art,and, well, the crazy reality that most desperate people live. It also tackles a Marxist concept but viewed from a strangely twisted angle. It is written mostly in the second person point of view and in the format of a 'coma diary' written by the female protagonist, Misty Wilmot. There is no subtlety in Palahniuk's style of writing, and when what he writes stabs, it stabs straight to the heart and conscience. It gets under your skin most of the time. I will not detail everything, but I just want to say that this is a satisfying read. The Palahniuk "flavor" is exotic and dark, and it's the sort of taste that most readers will only refer to as "poison". If only everyone reads closely, the antidote to the venom of reality that Palahniuk presents in this work is also present--right between the lines.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Salymar

    “It's so hard to forget pain, but it's even harder to remember sweetness. We have no scar to show for happiness. We learn so little from peace.” ― Chuck Palahniuk, Diary

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matthieu

    Yes, and?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Ashleigh

    The way this narrative was a dairy while also describing a diary was an amazing idea. The setting and the characters were the right type of people in the right place but something about it all made it sort of gross to read. And that was probably the point and I probably missed that but I wish it was more of an actual diary. I started reading with that idea and am a huge fan of epistolary fiction. My favorite of which is The Sorrows of Young Mike.

  5. 5 out of 5

    F

    Very slow to begin with. A little confusing at times but the end was great.

  6. 4 out of 5

    shana b

    no, no, no, no, no, no, no. NO. NO. This book is ridiculous. I've never found it exactly difficult to get through a Chuck Palahniuk book because he's one of the greatest, most complex writers I know of, but this book... it was such a drag. I prefferred babysitting over reading Diary. I had to pull myself through it each and every day. I get anxious if I don't finish a book so I couldn't toss it aside. The only reason I completely forced myself through it in less than a month is because I was so exci no, no, no, no, no, no, no. NO. NO. This book is ridiculous. I've never found it exactly difficult to get through a Chuck Palahniuk book because he's one of the greatest, most complex writers I know of, but this book... it was such a drag. I prefferred babysitting over reading Diary. I had to pull myself through it each and every day. I get anxious if I don't finish a book so I couldn't toss it aside. The only reason I completely forced myself through it in less than a month is because I was so excited to read another book I'd recieved in the mail. I love Palahniuk's writing style, I won't lie. The repitition and the way he makes you feel like he's TALKING to you instead of telling a story... I don't know. I like it. but in Diary, his writing style couldn't make up for the fact that it was just boring? I don't see how anyone could find this interesting and sometimes I worry that maybe I missed the moral/point of the story and i always want to reread it.. but I don't think I could bring myself to do it. Bleh.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Like all of Palahniuk’s other work, Diary is vivid, disturbing, grotesque, and a bit supernatural. If his descriptions don’t leave you feeling at least somewhat squeamish, then you must have no imagination whatsoever. He is like a painter who makes the simplest object look hideously grotesque, who can look at a common scene and envision it in the twisted way only a serial killer might. Only, the serial killers in his novels don’t kill for pleasure; they kill for reasons much more creative than t Like all of Palahniuk’s other work, Diary is vivid, disturbing, grotesque, and a bit supernatural. If his descriptions don’t leave you feeling at least somewhat squeamish, then you must have no imagination whatsoever. He is like a painter who makes the simplest object look hideously grotesque, who can look at a common scene and envision it in the twisted way only a serial killer might. Only, the serial killers in his novels don’t kill for pleasure; they kill for reasons much more creative than that. Palahniuk is nothing if not creative. Diary is written as a diary from the point of view of the protagonist, Misty, in the fashion of a long letter written to her comatose husband Peter. However, because she is writing to him directly, she refers to “you,” who also happens to be the reader, creating a number of identity overlaps. Moreover, the narrative habit of referring to oneself as “you” when writing in a diary comes up a number of times, because it would be equally applicable as referring to Peter or the reader as “you.” And none of this even begins to brush the surface of the story, which involves Misty’s allegedly supernatural artistic abilities, her inexplicable attraction to Peter’s shiny junk jewelry (which he pinned through his own scabby skin), and the creepy warnings she finds inside sealed-off rooms of buildings Peter remodeled before he tried to kill himself. Invisible Monsters will always be my favorite Palahniuk novel, and Fight Club will always be the most famous. Haunted might very well be the most disturbing. But Diary pays homage to what Palahniuk does best: turn a common story and a common story form into a extraordinary and very unsettling tale.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Imogen

    Hey, goodreads. Remember how seriously I used to take you? I would tell you every time I finished a book, and then I would tell you about the book. I guess I haven't been doing that as much lately. Kind of like how Chuck Palahniuk has been phoning it in for three books now, huh? Because look, this was the last one of his books I hadn't read. Now I have read all of them. And Chuck? The only reason I didn't give this one five stars is because it wasn't Rant, which I have built up in my head to be Hey, goodreads. Remember how seriously I used to take you? I would tell you every time I finished a book, and then I would tell you about the book. I guess I haven't been doing that as much lately. Kind of like how Chuck Palahniuk has been phoning it in for three books now, huh? Because look, this was the last one of his books I hadn't read. Now I have read all of them. And Chuck? The only reason I didn't give this one five stars is because it wasn't Rant, which I have built up in my head to be your grand achievement, or whatever the French word is. But Diary was great! Remember when your writing used to be transgressive not because of vibrator jokes, but because of the grim tone and the overwhelming, almost-but-not-quite cartoonishness of the immorality of all the characters? This was fun! You did interesting things with the plot- I don't even want to say what because it would give it away! The fact that you think girls are icky was expressed interestingly, instead of boringly! The metaphysical stuff was fun, the repeated staccato phrases didn't get overwhelming or boring, and there were homos. Thumbs up, Chuck. So here's what I think: Snuff, Pygmy and Tell-All are Chuck's humor trilogy. Y'know how he likes to write in trilogies? Diary is part of the horror trilogy with Haunted and... something else, I forget what. Well, Chuck, your humor trilogy has failed. Please write a second horror trilogy! Or keep doing sci-fi, like Rant! Because when you are on your are on. Finishing this one is kinda bittersweet.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shimelle

    This was my first selection to our book group -- and it definitely shook things up a bit. I love Palahniuk, and this is actually my favourite of his. Fight Club comes second, so if you hate Fight Club, I can't think you'll like this. The style is still there -- short, choppy ideas repeated until you wonder why, a vocabulary that makes you double take from time to time. One of our book groupies actually read it with a dictionary to hand because she wanted to know what every word meant. Which, give This was my first selection to our book group -- and it definitely shook things up a bit. I love Palahniuk, and this is actually my favourite of his. Fight Club comes second, so if you hate Fight Club, I can't think you'll like this. The style is still there -- short, choppy ideas repeated until you wonder why, a vocabulary that makes you double take from time to time. One of our book groupies actually read it with a dictionary to hand because she wanted to know what every word meant. Which, given my love of dictionaries, I think is pretty cool in its own little way. What I really love about this one, to set it apart from the others, is the amazing construction of the female narrator (something I wasn't sure he could do...but he certainly can) and the art slant to everything. It's a different perspective than the out-to-get-the-corporate-world of Fight Club or the out-to-get-the-truth-out of Survivor. It's more insular and introspective (well, as a diary should be) and the value of the written word and the work of art are important here...not so much the world. Don't read it if you'll be phased by the profanity or any of quite a few twisted images, but if you're willing to let it go as not-part-of-your-reality, it will definitely give you something to think about. I actually find it empowering, but there's no way I could explain that in less than about six lifetimes.

  10. 4 out of 5

    AmberBug *shelfnotes.com*

    My absolute favorite Chuck book so far. It spoke to me bring an artist wit the theme of artists suffering. Original storyline as usual, he does not disappoint... but rather brings it... fully (more so then any other book he has written, in my opinion). Suffering = living. Suffering = true feeling. Suffering = emotions. Emotions = Open mind. Open mind = creativity. Creativity = Artistic excellence. (Or something along those lines). This book made me realize why (as an artist) I go through dry spe My absolute favorite Chuck book so far. It spoke to me bring an artist wit the theme of artists suffering. Original storyline as usual, he does not disappoint... but rather brings it... fully (more so then any other book he has written, in my opinion). Suffering = living. Suffering = true feeling. Suffering = emotions. Emotions = Open mind. Open mind = creativity. Creativity = Artistic excellence. (Or something along those lines). This book made me realize why (as an artist) I go through dry spells of creativity and original thoughts/expressions. Sometimes I feel like things just click and sometimes I feel like I can't produce anything worth sharing (all the bullshit). It's absolutely true that when you are suffering... you think more, you brood more, you long for things to work out. BUT while things AREN'T working out... your mind is working in overtime. When things are going well in life, it's easy to go day to day, thinking about life and the deeper meaning of things less. When things aren't going well... you tend to open your mind a little, to try and figure out why... all those serious and depressing life questions come to the surface and those thoughts are what creates meaningful art. Any art with value has extreme emotions and deeper meanings to it... things that can't be reached unless you try real hard (which works better when your mind is open to the suffering). Think about it... at what time in your life do you ask yourself the deep questions regarding your life? Usually once something goes wrong. When things are going good, why think about things which could depress you? We all know that the meaning of life, in the overall scheme of things, is depressing as hell... and usually isn't brooded upon until we are in situations which put us there in the first place. Okay, so overall... one of my favorite book and HIGHLY recommended to anyone who has a creative bone in their body. It will help you recognize creativity, where it stems from and the sad reality behind anything created with any value. Depressing book... yes. But it is Chuck and should be expected. By far my favorite Chuck Palahniuk book yet. (Even though I know Haunted was his baby and has been the book he has been wanting to write throughout his entire career... I still believe this is his best).

  11. 5 out of 5

    MJ Nicholls

    The Correspondents #4 Dear MJ, Received your letter via Patrick. There are several things a man can do to attract a woman. I present a series of options for perusal in the following numerically partitioned sentences. 1) Kidnap. All you need for this is a car and a popular secluded late-night environs. Prowl lanes and nooks for bait. Once you have kidnapped your selected woman she will hate and fear you: the best qualities for a woman to have in any relationship. 2) Wear Down. Works best with frien The Correspondents #4 Dear MJ, Received your letter via Patrick. There are several things a man can do to attract a woman. I present a series of options for perusal in the following numerically partitioned sentences. 1) Kidnap. All you need for this is a car and a popular secluded late-night environs. Prowl lanes and nooks for bait. Once you have kidnapped your selected woman she will hate and fear you: the best qualities for a woman to have in any relationship. 2) Wear Down. Works best with friends. Wear a female friend down over a series of years by constantly telling them you like them and they won’t find anyone as devoted to them as you, and eventually they will ditch the dream of a proper man and take up with you out of desperation. 3) Subliminal Self-Advertising. Stalk your prey, and on their daily route, flash brief adverts of your brilliance at opportune moments. Signs saying MJ IS GREAT! YOU SHOULD MARRY MJ! every few yards. After a month or so she will fall into your arms. You can resuscitate her herbally. I hope these tips have been helpful. Good luck with the being you thing. Chuckily, Chuck Next Previous

  12. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    I have read over 8 books by this author and the only reason i gave him two stars was because i love fight club so much. honestly, i thought the movie was better than the book, but ill give it to him anyway. in an effort to be edgy and controversial, chuck loses sight of important literary necessities like continuity, concept, intelligence, character development, and so on. his books sometimes feel like i'm in someone else's bad acid trip. but of course, this is all probably intentional because h I have read over 8 books by this author and the only reason i gave him two stars was because i love fight club so much. honestly, i thought the movie was better than the book, but ill give it to him anyway. in an effort to be edgy and controversial, chuck loses sight of important literary necessities like continuity, concept, intelligence, character development, and so on. his books sometimes feel like i'm in someone else's bad acid trip. but of course, this is all probably intentional because he would rather be a cult icon than a pulitzer prize winner. right there with you chuck. dont get me wrong, he most certainly has his moments of genius, but they are few and far between.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Luis

    ETA: So I bought this edition because apparently I'm in love with the book. But I didn't know that the front cover is like this: I'm so happy because the gimmick is awesome. I appreciate it. I'm sad because this is for my collection of all Chuck Palahniuk and I'd like to wrap it in a plastic cover. How would I be able to do that if the edges are uneven? So Charlie the Wallflower, unlike you, I know why I'm both happy and sad at the same time... 2nd reading review: Just for the record, the weather toda ETA: So I bought this edition because apparently I'm in love with the book. But I didn't know that the front cover is like this: I'm so happy because the gimmick is awesome. I appreciate it. I'm sad because this is for my collection of all Chuck Palahniuk and I'd like to wrap it in a plastic cover. How would I be able to do that if the edges are uneven? So Charlie the Wallflower, unlike you, I know why I'm both happy and sad at the same time... 2nd reading review: Just for the record, the weather today is fiery stale summer but the air is full of regrets. Reasons I gave this 4 stars before and now I'm giving it 5 and how it's one of Chuck's best: -it is boring at the beginning. Don't get me wrong. It's boring because Chuck is already talking about some things you'll only understand if you've read the whole book already. That's why reading this again makes it way greater and more appealing. Reading it again will make you appreciate the genius of Chuck. How he perfectly weaves the plot and how clues are everywhere. And how he perfectly uses the repetition that were so overwhelming at first. And how he stirs and plays with your emotion. -I didn't find the story--the medium where Chuck's philosophy moves--fits the nihilistic points before. But rereading it made me understand. The weather today is obvious adoration of a book. "Your handwriting. The way you walk. Which china pattern you choose. It's all giving you away. Everything you do shows your hand. Your whole drug history's in a strand of your hair. Your fingernails. The forensic details. The lining of your stomach is a document. The calluses on your hand tell all your secrets. Your teeth give you away. Your accent. The wrinkles around your mouth and eyes. Everything you do shows your hand. Everything is a self-portrait. Everything is a diary." (view spoiler)[ plus point is there are gay characters lol (hide spoiler)] First reading review: I wonder where would I be now if I haven't met Chuck. He gets to the truth of things, of humanity, its real face. “It's so hard to forget pain, but it's even harder to remember sweetness. We have no scar to show for happiness. We learn so little from peace.” “You're always haunted by the idea you're wasting your life.”

  14. 4 out of 5

    رؤيا شعبان

    كيف يمكنك أن لا تقع في حبّ كتاب بدأ بهذا السطر ؟ "By the time you read this you'll be older than you remember " هل تريد ان تصبح رسام ، هل تخليت عن احلامك ، هل هناك من يستغل موهبتك ؟ من ضمن خطط قراءتي لعام 2015 كانت اكمال قراءة باقي اعمال تشاك بولانيك و قد وقع اختياري للبدء علي هذه الروايـة المذكرة بالتأكيد السبب الرئيسي للبدء بهذا الكتاب لان بطلته رسامة لان هذا الكتاب ، للرساميـن ، الفنانين ، لكل شخص له رغبه في الابتكار و الفن لان هذا الكتاب يتكلم ، عن الالهام "Who knows where an idea comes from , كيف يمكنك أن لا تقع في حبّ كتاب بدأ بهذا السطر ؟ "By the time you read this you'll be older than you remember " هل تريد ان تصبح رسام ، هل تخليت عن احلامك ، هل هناك من يستغل موهبتك ؟ من ضمن خطط قراءتي لعام 2015 كانت اكمال قراءة باقي اعمال تشاك بولانيك و قد وقع اختياري للبدء علي هذه الروايـة المذكرة بالتأكيد السبب الرئيسي للبدء بهذا الكتاب لان بطلته رسامة لان هذا الكتاب ، للرساميـن ، الفنانين ، لكل شخص له رغبه في الابتكار و الفن لان هذا الكتاب يتكلم ، عن الالهام "Who knows where an idea comes from , our inspiration . why we imagine what we imagine " " من يعلم من أين تاتي الفكرة ، الهامنا ، لماذا نتخيل ، ما نتخيل " عن الحلم " she'd be looking up at this window dreaming of begin a painter " " كانت تنظر للاعلا ، للنافدة ، تحلم بأن تصبح فنانة " عن الفشل "you're always haunted by the idea you're wasting your life " " انت مطارد.. بفكرة ، انك تضيع حياتك " الالهـــــــام " Inspration needs disease , injury , madness " تبدأ القصـة علي شكل مذكرات ثوتيق بالتواريخ ، اقرب للرسائل موجهه لشخص يُدعي " بيتر " يوم بعد يوم ، نبدأ بالتعرف عن بيتر ، و عن "ميتسي " زوجتـه التي التقي بها في مدرسة الفنّ نعلم ان ميتسي ، الطفلة التي قضت كل طفولها ترسم عظام السمك ، الملئ بالمنازل الخيالية ، الجزيرة الخيالية التي صنعتها بخيالها و رسمت فيها كل بيت كل نافدة كل شجرة ميستي تتخلا عن احلامها ، للتتزوج من بيـتر ، و تسافر معه لجزيرة ، جزيرة وايتين حيث عاشت اسرته للقرون ، للاجيال ، اسرته الملئيه بالرسامات و قصصهن الغريبة بيـتر لا يُحب ميسـتي ، بيتر تزوج ميستي من اجل مخطط كبير من اجل جزيرته من اجل مستقبل الجزيرة ، من اجل تاريخ الجزيرة ، من اجل ان تُحكي قصـة اخري للاجيال القادمة في الجزيرة و لكن كيف و ما علاقة ميستي بكل هذا ؟ يُحاول بيتر الانتحار و لكنه يفشل فيعيش في غيبوبه ، و تتحول ميستي للمدمنه شرب ، و تموت ابنتهما و خلال هذه الفترة ، نعود للماضي لنكتشف كيف وصلوا لهذه النهاية و من الشخص الذي يكتب لنا المذكرات ، من الشخص الذي يوثق هذه القصة اسلوب القصـة اقرب لاسلوب الشخص التاني ، حيث تشعر بالان القصة كلها موجهه لكّ بقدر ما هي مواجهه لبيتر وجدت نفسي في شخصية ميستي كثيراً لربما لهذا السبب حبي للكتاب سوف يكون مبالغ فيه لقد تعاطفت معاها لدرجة الجنون ، لدرجة البكاء "of you've reached middle age and you see how you're never going to be the big famous artist you dreamed of becoming and paint something that will touch and inspire people , really touch and move them and change their lives , you just don't have the talent , you don't have the brains or inspiration you don't have any of what it takes to create a masterpiece . القصـة يجب ان تُحكي لاجيال ، لان هذه القصـة قد تغير حياة اي شخص تدمر ، ربما تدمره اكثر لكن ربما تذكره بأحلامه علي الاقل ، اعجبني الاسلوب الكتابي ، بشكل كبيـر ، رغم ان الاسلوب ارتكز علي تكرر الكلمات مثل ، تحديد حالة الطقس بشكل فكاهي في كل مرة لتلطيف الاحداث "just for the record , the weather today is calm and sunny , but the air is full of bullshit " او تذكيرك بالاشياء التي يجب ان تتعلمها بنفسك كا رسام "what they don't teach you in art school is never .... " او تكرار هذه الجمله المستفزة "what you don't understand you can mean anything " كشخص قد قراءه العديد من كتب تشاك بولانيك من قـبل فان هذا التكرار شئ خاص في اسلوبه شئ يجب ان تعاد عليه اذا اردت ان تقرأ له باستمرار ، فهو يتخد طريقة ما في كل رواية و يركز علي تكرارها حتي تصبح نمط خاص بالكتاب هناك الكثير من الاقتبسات الملهمة في هذا الكتاب ، كما قلت هذا الكتاب كله عن الالهام "I bet if you painted what's in your heart , it could hang in museum " "ابصم لو انك رسمت ما في قلبك ، فسوف يعلق في متحف " اشعر بأنني مفتونة بالكتاب و اريد ان اتكلم عنه للأبد ، ربما اعيد قراءته مرات و مرات حتي اكرهه و ارميه لكنه حقاً سحرني ، فتح عيناي ، ذكرني بأشياء ، أبكني ، و الاهم من كل هذا وجدتُ قطعه من نفسي فيه و اعتقد ان اقرب الكتب لنا ، دائماً ، هي الكتب التي تخبرنا بالاشياء التي نحن حقاً نعرفها ولكننا نرغب في قراءتها في كتاب حتي نعلم اننا لسنا الوحديين الذين نفكروا بهذه الطريقة over all استطيع اختصار الكتاب كله في جمله واحدة "it's so hard to forget pain , but it's even harder to remember sweetness " أنصح الكتاب بقوة لكل المهتمين بالفن ، لكل الاشخاص الذين يبحثون عن شئ جديد و مميز لكن من يحب التفاصيـل الوصف الدقيق اللغة كانت صعبه بالنسبه لي بعض الشئ لكنها بصراحة ممتعه و قبل ان اختم هذه ترجمة بسيطة لمقطع من القصة اتناء القراءة https://www.facebook.com/bil3rabee/ph... لانني كنت مسحورة باللغة و لم اقاوم ترجمتها للعربي و لو بأمكاني ، لحولت هذا الكتاب لفيلم سينمائي لانه يستحق المزيد من الحُب و القرأ و اخر شئ ، الرسالة في نهاية الكتاب لابد أن تكون موجهه لي

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    there was very little i enjoyed about this book. palahniuk has a flair for quirky juxtaposition in his imagery, something i appreciate -- and probably the only thing i really appreciated in diary. just for the record, the 'just for the record' repeating business was super annoying. i don't mind an occasional repeat - the cadence can be quite charming at times. but repetition of this and other phrases, plus the penchant for describing people's musculature in action, it all felt pretentious instea there was very little i enjoyed about this book. palahniuk has a flair for quirky juxtaposition in his imagery, something i appreciate -- and probably the only thing i really appreciated in diary. just for the record, the 'just for the record' repeating business was super annoying. i don't mind an occasional repeat - the cadence can be quite charming at times. but repetition of this and other phrases, plus the penchant for describing people's musculature in action, it all felt pretentious instead of charming, or amusing. definitely served as a writerly warning to me. the core idea for the story itself - the origins of which i am a little confused about (enclosed letter from a fan, claiming at least partial authorship?) - it's an interesting one, and in its sleepy, disjointed little way, was entertaining, but just barely. i put this book down for over a month, and it's the first time i haven't read a book straight through. still, i can tell palahniuk is a good writer (or at least has the potential to be), and will likely check out more of his work...someday.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Charmie

    Some strange shit. Always the strange shit, Chuck. This novel tackled art in a very weird way. How it was used to save a cheesy named Island. How an artist was brought to a master plan by a strange group of Island people, to do her art, convince her to do her art and fulfill the prophecy of saving the Island. Enriching it. Nurturing it. Though some parts of the book were tough for me to handle, I consider this an easy read. Especially towards the ending. It felt like it was shortened and brought Some strange shit. Always the strange shit, Chuck. This novel tackled art in a very weird way. How it was used to save a cheesy named Island. How an artist was brought to a master plan by a strange group of Island people, to do her art, convince her to do her art and fulfill the prophecy of saving the Island. Enriching it. Nurturing it. Though some parts of the book were tough for me to handle, I consider this an easy read. Especially towards the ending. It felt like it was shortened and brought to a conclusion immediately just so Chuck could end it. Terms were easier to understand then. I've read his recent book, Damned, and in that, Chuck still had his 'repetitive use' of phrases and words.. Making it look like some hidden clues for deciphering something that might come in handy when Chuck leaves the world, make a name of his own, as the author with readers disgusted by his works.. I don't know. Maybe he really wanted to have this effect on people. He writes like this to manipulate, and confuse. And he's better this way, really. I like the book. I really like it. Misty spoke to me in some unexplainable ways to awaken my own 'personal coma'. I really liked the idea of some form of a cult, a pagan god, witchcraft, tradition and the thrill I feel especially towards the ending. Though I never knew what her mural looked like, I'd say it was perfect that people were burned to death.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I'm always struck by just how weird Palahniuk's novels are. In the case of this one, I really thought I had it figured out. Turns out, I didn't. I should probably just give up trying and enjoy the story. Which I usually do. Misty lives on Waytansea Island with a husband in a coma and a mother in law who seems bent on pushing her to be the famous artist everyone seems to think she is. While Misty went to school for art, she takes it as an insult that everyone thinks she, a poor white trash girl, I'm always struck by just how weird Palahniuk's novels are. In the case of this one, I really thought I had it figured out. Turns out, I didn't. I should probably just give up trying and enjoy the story. Which I usually do. Misty lives on Waytansea Island with a husband in a coma and a mother in law who seems bent on pushing her to be the famous artist everyone seems to think she is. While Misty went to school for art, she takes it as an insult that everyone thinks she, a poor white trash girl, should be producing great works of art. After her husband fails an attempt at suicide, she begins a diary that she writes to him in his vegatative state. As she chronicles her everyday life, she tells of meeting Angel, a man who seems to appreciate her work too much. She tells of people that her husband did work for calling and threatening to sue for disappearing rooms and strange writing underneath the dry wall and wallpaper work. Misty's story gets stranger as her mother in law and those around her all seem to be conspiring and pushing for the art they "know" she can produce. Through most of this book, I was trying to see if I could figure out the "secret." I never did. Parts of it dragged, and parts of it had to be re-read just because his style of writing isn't always standard. But by the end, I was completely into the story and, like always, completely surprised. Definitely a good read for Palahniuk fans or anyone who likes novels that don't follow anything relatively normal.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maria Pallozzi

    Il miglior libro di Palahniuk che io abbia letto. E diciamo che li ho letti quasi tutti, ormai. Misty vive su un'isola di cui ha sognato e ritratto le case e i luoghi per tutta la vita, prima di vederli. Ha un marito, una figlia, pensava di poter vivere felice rinunciando al sogno di diventare un'artista, solo grazie alla gioia domestica della famiglia che aveva creato. Ma c'è qualcuno che non la pensa così: Misty deve diventare un'artista, e sarà una grande artista, e chiunque attorno a lei la inv Il miglior libro di Palahniuk che io abbia letto. E diciamo che li ho letti quasi tutti, ormai. Misty vive su un'isola di cui ha sognato e ritratto le case e i luoghi per tutta la vita, prima di vederli. Ha un marito, una figlia, pensava di poter vivere felice rinunciando al sogno di diventare un'artista, solo grazie alla gioia domestica della famiglia che aveva creato. Ma c'è qualcuno che non la pensa così: Misty deve diventare un'artista, e sarà una grande artista, e chiunque attorno a lei la invita a tentare, a non desistere. Suo marito nel frattempo ha tentato in suicidio ed è in coma, e la loro bambina viene plagiata dalla vecchia Grace, la nonna paterna che ha una passione particolare nel programmare la vita della nuora, Misty. Se è vero che da una grande sofferenza scaturisce l'arte più pura ci saranno persone che si prodigheranno affinchè Misty possa patire le pene dell'inferno. Se esiste qualcosa da conoscere che non si impara ma si ricorda, saranno le persone attorno alla protagonista a permetterle di ricordare. E' davvero un libro meraviglioso, e non voglio indugiare oltre perchè potrei svelare più del dovuto, sappiamo che Palahniuk ama sconvolgere la trama a poche pagine dal finale, e con questo ho già aiutato molto.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    I met a guy in a coffee shop while reading this. Guy: Is this your first time reading this? Me: First? Why, have you read it more than once? Guy: Nah, once was enough. What he should have said was NOT AT ALL was enough. The back had a review comparing Palahniuk to Vonnegut. No. No, no, no. If anything, Palahniuk is a slightly sour rip off of Pynchon's Lot 49. A lot of the book seemed unnecessary to the story, which is why I was able to finish it so quickly. Skimming, skimming, skimming. The story is t I met a guy in a coffee shop while reading this. Guy: Is this your first time reading this? Me: First? Why, have you read it more than once? Guy: Nah, once was enough. What he should have said was NOT AT ALL was enough. The back had a review comparing Palahniuk to Vonnegut. No. No, no, no. If anything, Palahniuk is a slightly sour rip off of Pynchon's Lot 49. A lot of the book seemed unnecessary to the story, which is why I was able to finish it so quickly. Skimming, skimming, skimming. The story is told from an interesting perspective (diary written to unconscious husband of manipulated/used wife who ends up being heroine), but it just doesn't hit a voice or tone that is an interesting as the perspective. Misty Marie (artist) is a loser with a brain dead husband, a controlling mother in-law and a daughter who is on the mother in-law's side, I guess? It's all about finding out why Misty is on the island, why people are wanting her to paint, why her husband wrote all over people's walls, why he married her in the first place, why why why and the answer is supposed to be an M. Night Shamylan whatever gasp, but it was more a "thank god this book is over" sigh of relief

  20. 4 out of 5

    Smyth

    I think this may be my favorite of his to date. It's twisted and spooky, and made me feel a little sick to my stomach on more than one occasion. Hmmm...that doesn't sound like a glowing review, but if you're into Palahniuk, you know what I mean. It reminded me of Dunn's _Geek Love_ a little, in that I felt both entranced and disgusted by the characters in the stories, and I just knew that the outcome wouldn't be good...had that nagging, sinking dread feeling while reading the entire thing; yet, I think this may be my favorite of his to date. It's twisted and spooky, and made me feel a little sick to my stomach on more than one occasion. Hmmm...that doesn't sound like a glowing review, but if you're into Palahniuk, you know what I mean. It reminded me of Dunn's _Geek Love_ a little, in that I felt both entranced and disgusted by the characters in the stories, and I just knew that the outcome wouldn't be good...had that nagging, sinking dread feeling while reading the entire thing; yet, the narrative in both was so driving and compelling that I didn't even want to stop for a minute. I've walked away from other novels that have made me nervous and twitchy, but these two made me all train-wreck-voyeuristic-y, and abandoning them wasn't even an option. I can't even begin to describe the plot of _Diary_. I fear I'd only muck it up. And, you know what, it looks like I've taken care of my review of _Geek Love_, too. 5 stars for that little twisted beauty.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jim Peterson

    I found this in a so-called open library. A public bookshelf where you can give or take books for free. As I read, I kept noticing little dots or lines penciled in beside the text. I got to wondering what they meant. Did they point out an interesting passage? Did indicate some text the reader didn't understand? For most of the book I was more intrigued by this mystery than by the book itself. Nevertheless, the last 20% of the book was unputdownable, so that more or less makes up for the slow start. I found this in a so-called open library. A public bookshelf where you can give or take books for free. As I read, I kept noticing little dots or lines penciled in beside the text. I got to wondering what they meant. Did they point out an interesting passage? Did indicate some text the reader didn't understand? For most of the book I was more intrigued by this mystery than by the book itself. Nevertheless, the last 20% of the book was unputdownable, so that more or less makes up for the slow start. I probably never would have read another of Chuck's books if I hadn't found this one for free. Unfortunately, I can't say whether or not it was a fortuitous find. I am most definitely kind of glad I read it. The art history aspects weaved into the plot were very cool. I'll give it that. Anyway, the book was more than worth what I paid for it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    David Becker

    My summary of opinions of this book? So young! So angry! Anytime you see so many varying opinions of a book, it's worth picking up, even if you'll just be taking part in a literary car accident: you just HAVE to look to see why everyone is slowing down. I'll bet Chuck's airbags went off after this book, but I think it's possible that it's just a fender bender. I think a lot of Palahniuk's work is like a drunk guy shooting arrows at a bunch of children lined up against a wall with apples on their h My summary of opinions of this book? So young! So angry! Anytime you see so many varying opinions of a book, it's worth picking up, even if you'll just be taking part in a literary car accident: you just HAVE to look to see why everyone is slowing down. I'll bet Chuck's airbags went off after this book, but I think it's possible that it's just a fender bender. I think a lot of Palahniuk's work is like a drunk guy shooting arrows at a bunch of children lined up against a wall with apples on their heads. Will he split the apple occasionally? You bet! But he'll make a gigantic mess doing it. So, enough stalling. I did like this book. I saw it in an airport on the way to Miami, looked it up online, and saw divergent opinions, so I picked it up. I absolutely do not see this as a horror story, so whoever had that idea needs to be slapped around a bit, but I enjoyed enough of it where I could suggest it to a couple of people. I liked the continuing discovery of the hidden messages as the book went on, and I also liked the slowly-revealed courthship that you see, too: the last time I saw a family like this that has lost its prestige yet still clings to a name (or island, here) was in James Mitchener's "Chesapeake". I know people like this. It's a perfect match, and described very well, in Palahniuk's signature style. I'd almost like to see him tackle something from life like that, because I think he's be able to grab people and get them reading history. Ah, but the flaws. Some of this is just absurd. I don't like people that bury themself in foolishness just to spring themselves with a ridiculous twist or plot device. In that way, I thought we got a little "Left Behind" going on, and that is by no means a compliment. Also, the fire at the end? is that the resolution? There's cliches a plenty here, especially if I could find a way to put the accent marks over the word as I type. I don't know. I suspect that Chuck is turning into the literary equivalent of Dane Cook: a master at marketing himself to a core audience that will eagerly buy what he is selling, and he has occasional flashes of brilliance, but at the core, he's mediocre. Dane Cook has just about exhausted his 15 minutes. Is Palahniuk also a one-trick pony, albeit one greatly assisted by and indebted to David Fincher, Brad Pitt, and Edward Norton?

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    I think Palahniuk is a lot like Vonnegut (and some might disagree with me here). He is an absurdist. He takes serious issues (like class and love and why is art always schtick) and mocks our human nature to exploit everything for our own pleasure in a serious tone but in a totally ridiculous way. Many people read Palahniuk's stuff and are disgusted and/or horrified. I laugh. Seriously, I think he is one of the funniest guys around. It is not quite laugh-out-loud, but definitely chuckle under my I think Palahniuk is a lot like Vonnegut (and some might disagree with me here). He is an absurdist. He takes serious issues (like class and love and why is art always schtick) and mocks our human nature to exploit everything for our own pleasure in a serious tone but in a totally ridiculous way. Many people read Palahniuk's stuff and are disgusted and/or horrified. I laugh. Seriously, I think he is one of the funniest guys around. It is not quite laugh-out-loud, but definitely chuckle under my breath. Unfortunately, I was a bit under-whelmed with Diary. Misty's style of repetition (while effective at making her point) was a bit annoying. I thought her weather reports were kind of cute, but the constant reminder that "what you don't understand you can make mean anything" was a bit over the top. My favorite quote in the whole book was: "It's so hard to forget pain, but it's even harder to remember sweetness. We have no scar to show for happiness. We learn so little from peace" and this is true..to an extent. I think that people do repeat their mistakes and (in fact) the irony lies in this statement. Misty makes it because she laments not appreciating her happy days in full. However, the islanders are on their quest for a new artist BECAUSE they remember their happy days so well and want to get back to them. The book itself is short, but I did find it slightly tedious and it took me way too long to read (although lots was going on here making it difficult to sneak away with my book the past few days). Ultimately, it was a character piece about a place and that made it a bit less compelling. The whole "plot twist" at the end was a bit too hard to take, but certainly explained how Misty was able to paint the island before she ever saw it. Overall I am kind of ambivalent. There were parts I really enjoyed, but I did feel like it slogged. Recommended for those with odd/gross sense of humor and who like Palahniuk's other stuff. Not so much for everyone else.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    2006 notebook: a run of disappointing books: David Peace's 1977 disappointing; Palahniuk's Diary about disappearing bathrooms a disappointment. Sophisticated Boom Boom, a growing-up-in- Eniskillen-in-the-punk-era a disappointment.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Booklover Butterfly

    Misty Wilmot was a promising young artist back in her youth. She met Peter in art school, married him, had his daughter, and somewhere along the line her talent seemed to dry up. Her husband’s unsuccessful suicide attempt has left him in a coma, and Misty is turning to alcohol to get her through the days. Peter was a contractor, and now his former clients are threatening lawsuits at Misty because rooms in their houses have disappeared and there are disturbing messages on the walls. Amidst all of Misty Wilmot was a promising young artist back in her youth. She met Peter in art school, married him, had his daughter, and somewhere along the line her talent seemed to dry up. Her husband’s unsuccessful suicide attempt has left him in a coma, and Misty is turning to alcohol to get her through the days. Peter was a contractor, and now his former clients are threatening lawsuits at Misty because rooms in their houses have disappeared and there are disturbing messages on the walls. Amidst all of this stress and turmoil, Misty’s artistic talent comes roaring back. Soon Misty finds herself in the middle of a dangerous plot that could endanger many lives. Diary by Chuck Palahniuk is a suspenseful, darkly twisted read. I’ve come to expect a certain level of disturbing and shocking content in a Chuck Palahniuk novel, enough to make me cringe but at the same time make it so I can’t look away. Diary definitely didn’t let me down on that front! Palahniuk paints a vivid picture of his characters and the setting, but he often chooses to describe these things based on their flaws and ugliness. I thought this was a very interesting and truly Palahniuk approach to thing. One of the things I love most about Chuck Palahniuk books is that he always includes really random and fascinating bits of information in his novels. Due to the art theme woven into the plot of Diary, the tidbits of information are all revolving around art, artists, and my personal favorite, the different ingredients in different shades of paint. You’d be really surprised what’s in some of it. The plot of Diary felt different from the other Palahniuk novels I’ve read. It had a suspenseful, almost mystery novel feel to it, but done in a unique way that is true to the author’s nihilistic, unsettling style. While I did predict some of the aspects of the plot, I was still surprised by the majority of events taking place. Things weave together at the end in a much more complex, solid fashion than I would have expected. I was truly creeped out by the events taking place, probably because even though it’s unrealistic to think that people would actually stoop to the level of the characters in this novel, I could sort of see a bunch of greedy, disturbed people pulling something this horrifying. Even though Palahniuk’s novels are bizarre and hard to believe at times, they aren’t completely out of the realm of possibility. For readers looking to step outside their comfort zone and try something new, I highly recommend Diary by Chuck Palahniuk. It was a fantastic read!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Guillermo Jiménez

    La novela funciona. Tiene congruencia, un poco de pretensión aderezado con una historia macabra: un bebé de Rosemary del arte. El complot de una sociedad en virtud del continuum cíclico de un modus viviendi que nada tiene de romántico ni de sensible. Misty es un engendro creado por un grupo de lunáticos que pretenden sobrevivir con su estilo de vida anquilosado por años, sangrando a el arte: la pintura y lo que mucho, poco o nada pueda decir al mundo. De acuerdo, Palahniuk tiene buenas ideas. Un t La novela funciona. Tiene congruencia, un poco de pretensión aderezado con una historia macabra: un bebé de Rosemary del arte. El complot de una sociedad en virtud del continuum cíclico de un modus viviendi que nada tiene de romántico ni de sensible. Misty es un engendro creado por un grupo de lunáticos que pretenden sobrevivir con su estilo de vida anquilosado por años, sangrando a el arte: la pintura y lo que mucho, poco o nada pueda decir al mundo. De acuerdo, Palahniuk tiene buenas ideas. Un tanto torcidas aquí y allá, fundamentadas con lecturas sobre anatomía, psicología jungiana y corrientes filosóficas jansenistas o ve tu a saber qué, las tiras cómicas del diaro dominical o el prime time de la teli. ¿Tiene talento? Quizás. Al menos en esta obra permean estructuras ordenadas y una trama que desenvuelve su tensión dosificándola, esparciendo poco a poco el qué va a contarnos. Capítulo a capítulo, es decir, día a día en la entrada de este «diario» se nos relata en primera persona la vida de Misty, aspirante de pintora, de artista, venida a menos, venida a casi nada. Sin embargo, en las últimas páginas ya estás cansado. Te comienza a desinteresar el destino fatal de esos personajes desquiciados y pervertidos, de sus ínfulas de abolengo y aristocracia extinta. Insisto, el libro funciona, y no me extraña por qué es tan rimbombante y efectista el nombre del autor, a quien muchos conocimos a través de la otrora artificiosa película (basada en otra novela de él) The Fight Club. Lectura fácil, en cuanto que cualquier persona con dos dedos de frente puede entender casi de cabo a rabo. Me deja un sabor final de fuego artificial, de lucecitas de colores en el árbol de navidad, lucecitas con forma de calaveras o pentagramas, intenta asustar, pero, la verdad, no lo logra, es una farsa, una telenovela. Tengo otro de él que me interesa por la temática, Choke. Sin embargo, tendré que quitarme ese regusto salobre que me quedó después de apurar las últimas 20 o 30 o 100 páginas de esta. No, no lo disfrute y hasta pensé en lanzarlo por la ventana.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Ghazali

    Novel ini perihalnya tentang seorang ibu tunggal (suaminya koma setelah cubaan bunuh diri yang gagal) yang berbakat seni melukis diekploitasi supaya menghasilkan sebuah karya agung oleh keluarga suaminya semata-mata mahu mengubah taraf hidup setiap empat generasi keluarga dan sekolektif penduduk di sebuah pulau yang menjadi hamba konsumer rentetan lambakan kehadiran pelancong luar ke pulau mereka yang telah dikomersialkan. Mereka percaya sesebuah karya agung hanya mampu diterjemahkan melalui peny Novel ini perihalnya tentang seorang ibu tunggal (suaminya koma setelah cubaan bunuh diri yang gagal) yang berbakat seni melukis diekploitasi supaya menghasilkan sebuah karya agung oleh keluarga suaminya semata-mata mahu mengubah taraf hidup setiap empat generasi keluarga dan sekolektif penduduk di sebuah pulau yang menjadi hamba konsumer rentetan lambakan kehadiran pelancong luar ke pulau mereka yang telah dikomersialkan. Mereka percaya sesebuah karya agung hanya mampu diterjemahkan melalui penyeksaan mental dan fizikal secara tak langsung karya malah pelukis itu sendiri kemudiannya akan terus terpateri di ingatan sampai bila-bila sama ada melalui karya agung yang telah dikerjakan atau balik cerita proses pembikinan. Fahaman ini dirintis melalui rujukan daripada sebuah diari milik pelukis lagenda terdahulu lalu kandungan diari itu yang berupa catatan kehidupan sadis digunapakai untuk diduplikasikan kepada bakat seni baru yang terpilih sebagai suatu bentuk ritual untuk mengubah nasib dan taraf hidup mereka setiap empat generasi. Aku fikir novel ini juga bersifat sinikal kepada pengusaha industri pelancongan khususnya di pulau-pulau yang seharusnya tak perlu dicemari oleh unsur komersial akibatnya atmosfera pulau yang sebelumnya telus mula dihadang oleh lambakan objek legap seperti papan-papan iklan komersial yang merosakkan pemandangan. Manakala penduduk asal pulau yang asalnya tuan di bumi sendiri kemudiannya menjadi hamba komersial dengan bekerja di hotel dan restoran secara tak langsung menjadi golongan berkasta rendah kepada pelancong luar. Kalau novel ini mahu diadaptasi kepada filem, aku akan pilih Martin Scorsese sebagai pengarah.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emanuel

    This is my first Palahniuk's book... It's creatively written, I do quite enjoy the book as the writing style is very unique and easily get drowned to it, he (Palahniuk) could be a "Tarantino in literature" (hmmm... i might be wrong...). At first I annoyed with all the dates, but then, i ignored them, maybe that's another point which make this book unique, it's a diary anyway... playing with dates, days, and times... I have to re-read the beginning of the book for few times, when it's talking abo This is my first Palahniuk's book... It's creatively written, I do quite enjoy the book as the writing style is very unique and easily get drowned to it, he (Palahniuk) could be a "Tarantino in literature" (hmmm... i might be wrong...). At first I annoyed with all the dates, but then, i ignored them, maybe that's another point which make this book unique, it's a diary anyway... playing with dates, days, and times... I have to re-read the beginning of the book for few times, when it's talking about face muscles... well, i am not good in memorizing the scientific terms of those muscles. :P Why only 3 stars then? I'm quite biased, after I've read the short review on the back cover... someone from Time Out has said about "Rosemary's Baby" & "The Wicker Man", so i had both Mia Farrow and Nic Cage settled in my mind (not in purpose), just before i started reading the book, I have seen both movies mentioned and to be honest, i dislike The Wicker Man (the remake), maybe the book (if any) or the first movie installment are better. So, basically the review (at the back cover) has ruined my imagination and make this book pretty predictable, and another point by me, i do not really like the end of the story, sort of an anti-climax, a typical Hollywood ending. All the ancient painters are the witches, who are doing witchcrafts by concocting colored potions for the paintings. Emerald green is actually insecticide, poisonous. Tyrian purple is made from clams. Dutch pink is crushed buckhorn berries. And Indian yellow is the urine of cattle fed mango leaves. Well, i like that part... ;)

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

    I think Chuck Palahniuk is one of those authors I just don't and am not going to get. I tried to read another book of his years ago and it left me the same way as this one -- weird, with intriguing ideas, but the writing style just doesn't work for me. Too much nihilism and odd, uncomfortable scenes that make me squirm, not in a good way. Diary is ostensibly the diary of a Misty Wilmot, whose husband is in a coma after a suicide attempt. She was an art student before she married her schlub of a h I think Chuck Palahniuk is one of those authors I just don't and am not going to get. I tried to read another book of his years ago and it left me the same way as this one -- weird, with intriguing ideas, but the writing style just doesn't work for me. Too much nihilism and odd, uncomfortable scenes that make me squirm, not in a good way. Diary is ostensibly the diary of a Misty Wilmot, whose husband is in a coma after a suicide attempt. She was an art student before she married her schlub of a husband, Peter, who brought her back to Waytansea Island, which is some kind of shitty little tourist town with insular, busybody, slightly creepy locals and well-heeled visitors. Now Misty is a fat, aging, for-all-practical-purposes single mother who cleans hotels, takes care of her daughter, and reflects bitterly on the death of her artistic dreams and why she ever married Peter. It turns out that the island's residents are creepier than you think. When Misty's daughter tragically dies, she is seized with a burst of creativity and begins to paint. Her fellow Waytanseaers encourage her. She begins to find clues left around the island that other women have come here before her in similar circumstances. The plot, when it is revealed, is a creepy little conspiracy with a touch of the supernatural. There are a few bright moments in the book, and some lines that stood out, but it just couldn't hold my interest enough for me to get past how much I disliked the voice and all the characters. Overall, it kind of resembled an inferior approximation of a Stephen King novel.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karim Kassam

    This was my first, and long overdue introduction into the dark and often schizophrenic world of Chuck Palahniuk. I read this in September of 2006, so you'll have to pardon the lack of specific details. Palahniuk's success, or at least, my appreciation for this book, comes from his darkly paranoid writing style. In many cases, authors who write to imbue confusion in the reader do so at the expense of narrative cohesion. Diary's success lies in the fact that it disorients the reader, but can desc This was my first, and long overdue introduction into the dark and often schizophrenic world of Chuck Palahniuk. I read this in September of 2006, so you'll have to pardon the lack of specific details. Palahniuk's success, or at least, my appreciation for this book, comes from his darkly paranoid writing style. In many cases, authors who write to imbue confusion in the reader do so at the expense of narrative cohesion. Diary's success lies in the fact that it disorients the reader, but can describe in parallel separate lives and disparate events as part of a cohesive narrative thread, while maintaining the uniqueness and economy of prose that Palahniuk brings to all his books. That said, Diary is not a book for the faint of heart. Palahniuk's oft-schizophrenic prose imbues the reader's mind with unsettling, and often frightening imagery and emotion as he digs into the familiar territory of identity and its social constructs through some very interesting narrative conceits. Of course, it takes two to three readings to fully explore the depth of Diary, a classic trait of Palahniuk's books. While Diary does not live up to the standard of Fight Club, it is certainly a book worthy of attention for the seasoned Palahniuk fan.

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