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In Wizard's First Rule, Richard Cypher's world was turned upside down. Once a simple woods guide, Richard was forced to become the Seeker of Truth, to save the world from the vile dominance of Darken Rahl, the most viciously savage and powerful wizard the world had ever seen. He was joined on this epic quest by his beloved Kahlan, the only survivor among the Confessors, wh In Wizard's First Rule, Richard Cypher's world was turned upside down. Once a simple woods guide, Richard was forced to become the Seeker of Truth, to save the world from the vile dominance of Darken Rahl, the most viciously savage and powerful wizard the world had ever seen. He was joined on this epic quest by his beloved Kahlan, the only survivor among the Confessors, who brought a powerful but benevolent justice to the land before Rahl's evil scourge. Aided by Zedd, the last of the wizards who opposed Rahl, they were able to cast him into the underworld, saving the world from the living hell of life under Rahl. But the veil to the underworld has been torn, and Rahl, from beyond the veil, begins to summon a sinister power more dreadful than any he has wielded before. Horrifying creatures escape through the torn veil, wreaking havoc on the unsuspecting world above. If Rahl isn't stopped, he will free the Keeper itself, an evil entity whose power is so vast and foul that once freed, it can never again be contained. Richard and Kahlan must face Rahl and the Keeper's terrible minions. But first, Richard must endure the ministrations of the Sisters of the Light, or die from the pain of magic that is his birthright and his curse. While Richard undertakes the arduous journey to the forbidden city of the Sisters, Kahlan must embark upon a long and dangerous mission to Aydindril, citadel of the old wizards, where she hopes to find Zedd and the help only he can lend to their desperate cause. War, suffering, torture, and deceit lie in their paths, and nothing will save them from a destiny of violent death, unless their courage and faith are joined with luck and they find the elusive...Stone of Tears.


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In Wizard's First Rule, Richard Cypher's world was turned upside down. Once a simple woods guide, Richard was forced to become the Seeker of Truth, to save the world from the vile dominance of Darken Rahl, the most viciously savage and powerful wizard the world had ever seen. He was joined on this epic quest by his beloved Kahlan, the only survivor among the Confessors, wh In Wizard's First Rule, Richard Cypher's world was turned upside down. Once a simple woods guide, Richard was forced to become the Seeker of Truth, to save the world from the vile dominance of Darken Rahl, the most viciously savage and powerful wizard the world had ever seen. He was joined on this epic quest by his beloved Kahlan, the only survivor among the Confessors, who brought a powerful but benevolent justice to the land before Rahl's evil scourge. Aided by Zedd, the last of the wizards who opposed Rahl, they were able to cast him into the underworld, saving the world from the living hell of life under Rahl. But the veil to the underworld has been torn, and Rahl, from beyond the veil, begins to summon a sinister power more dreadful than any he has wielded before. Horrifying creatures escape through the torn veil, wreaking havoc on the unsuspecting world above. If Rahl isn't stopped, he will free the Keeper itself, an evil entity whose power is so vast and foul that once freed, it can never again be contained. Richard and Kahlan must face Rahl and the Keeper's terrible minions. But first, Richard must endure the ministrations of the Sisters of the Light, or die from the pain of magic that is his birthright and his curse. While Richard undertakes the arduous journey to the forbidden city of the Sisters, Kahlan must embark upon a long and dangerous mission to Aydindril, citadel of the old wizards, where she hopes to find Zedd and the help only he can lend to their desperate cause. War, suffering, torture, and deceit lie in their paths, and nothing will save them from a destiny of violent death, unless their courage and faith are joined with luck and they find the elusive...Stone of Tears.

30 review for Stone of Tears

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    Not as good as the first book but I still loved it Happy Reading! Mel ❤ Not as good as the first book but I still loved it Happy Reading! Mel ❤️

  2. 4 out of 5

    Richard Houchin

    Richard: we've gone from children being brutalized to the very depths of psychosexual sadism and perversion, including copropilia and yes, a little bit of pedo/necrophilia too Mike: pedo AND necro? Richard: yeah Mike: at... the same time? Richard: yes. I feel genuinely guilty reading this book Mike: ..... ....... Richard: it's unbelievable Mike: Dammit amazon, why don't you have same-day shipping? Richard: it's a book they would sell to children without carding them, but if GTA gets sold to a kid it's ho Richard: we've gone from children being brutalized to the very depths of psychosexual sadism and perversion, including copropilia and yes, a little bit of pedo/necrophilia too Mike: pedo AND necro? Richard: yeah Mike: at... the same time? Richard: yes. I feel genuinely guilty reading this book Mike: ..... ....... Richard: it's unbelievable Mike: Dammit amazon, why don't you have same-day shipping? Richard: it's a book they would sell to children without carding them, but if GTA gets sold to a kid it's horrible Mike: haha GTA4 is supposed to be excellent, incidentally Richard: so i have heard Mike: but i don't even know what platform its for Richard: i bet it doesn't have pedonecrophilia, though, and i didn't even mention the bestiality yet, or, even worse, the masochism connected with all of this. I'm really shocked by the series Mike: ......! Richard: and i am just on book 2 of 11 Mike: good lord maybe he's trying to scare people off Richard: i am genuinely hoping the characters die and die soon Mike: ... uhhh Richard: because their lives are unspeakable Mike: "Richard: i am genuinely hoping the characters die and die soon and yes, a little bit of pedo/necrophilia too" So maybe you hope they grow up ... and then die? Richard: when the characters get into life threatening situations, I don't feel dramatic tension i feel hopeful, like maybe a happy ending is finally in reach!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Choko

    *** 4. 55 ***

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aela

    This book is monsterous - considerably longer than the first book of the series, Wizard's First Rule -almost 1000 pages long. Needless to say, I never once found it boring,dull,or droning on and on. Every page and chapter in the book added something to the plot and the continuing saga of Richard and Kahlan. The story starts right from the same time when Wizard's First Rule ended, not having to explain months or years of events that the reader didn't get to, well, read about. That always annoys m This book is monsterous - considerably longer than the first book of the series, Wizard's First Rule -almost 1000 pages long. Needless to say, I never once found it boring,dull,or droning on and on. Every page and chapter in the book added something to the plot and the continuing saga of Richard and Kahlan. The story starts right from the same time when Wizard's First Rule ended, not having to explain months or years of events that the reader didn't get to, well, read about. That always annoys me when a series does that. So far, this series is made all the better because it hasn't done that. In this book, even more than the first one, I noticed that Goodkind switches to the point of view of several other side characters - and in some cases, different villans. However, this really adds a lot more depth to the book. I like to have different perspectives on events - it just makes the book seem all the more interesting. Some of my favorite side characters were introduced - including Sister Verna, one of the Sisters of Light. I identified most with her because she is the tempermental, strong-willed kind of lady who is just trying to do her job, yet Richard (known as Richard With the Temper amongst the Mud People - and for good reason) is constantly been a stubborn ox and arguing with her about everything. Of course, I understand Richard's point of view as well. He's already half-denying that he has the magical gift,yet of course he does - but in addition he has to leave his love, Kahlan and journey to a far-off place without marrying her as planned! Cutest character - a baby gar that Richard almost kills, but seeing the way it cries and looks up at him with those big eyes, decides to leave it be. He ends up befriending the gar, Gratch, who follows him around as a loyal friend. Awwww!♥ I also loved Warren as a character. He's the shy, mousy sort of guy who is always made fun of. However, Richard sees him as a friend and important ally, since Warren can decipher the confusing prophecies that name Richard as the "bringer of death". And Richard certainly lives up to his title. He seems to be really accepting his role as the Seeker, and now a wizard, in this book. At times it seems like he is always intense, focused, sometimes insulting to people, and making threats to those who may count themselves as his enemies. But what really made the book interesting was how Richard seemed to be able to do everything, any challenge -including things that nobody else had done for thousands of years. Yet, he always attributes his accomplishments to luck, chance, or foolish superstitions and stories. At the same time, I found Kahlan's story intriguing - especially with the addition of Chandalen as a stubborn and usually insulting side character. He becomes loveable though, especially when he and the reader are able to recognize how Kahlan is not only a strong woman, but a fierce war leader as well. And the ending - well let's just say it was satisfactory - for the reader and the characters. I'm still in love with this series and am looking forward to the third book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ben Babcock

    This book was bad. I found parts of it way better than the first book, Wizard's First Rule, and parts of it abysmal. The only saving grace was the fact that I'm a sucker for crowning moments of awesome, and this book has quite a few. Richard seems to be turning into a Mary Sue (or Marty Stu, if you have it that way). Don't get me wrong--I love to torture a character, rip away his world, and do bad things to him in general. But you need to make them stick. When you send someone through this pain a This book was bad. I found parts of it way better than the first book, Wizard's First Rule, and parts of it abysmal. The only saving grace was the fact that I'm a sucker for crowning moments of awesome, and this book has quite a few. Richard seems to be turning into a Mary Sue (or Marty Stu, if you have it that way). Don't get me wrong--I love to torture a character, rip away his world, and do bad things to him in general. But you need to make them stick. When you send someone through this pain and they emerge completely whole and happy, what's the point? So far Richard seems to be a rather static character. Yes, he's learning more magic, but he's still a headstrong idiot. And what's with Kahlan being raped nearly every second chapter? Seriously, I could do without that. Rape is a very potent device, which is why it shouldn't be used too often, especially not on the main character. Weighing in at 979 pages, this book is a doorstopper that could have been edited down to a respectable 500-600. Parts of it were unnecessary, adversely affecting the pacing of the entire story. By the end, I just--well, I wanted it to end. The story has merit. The characters are likable (not loveable). With some effort, I find the books enjoyable. But they could be better.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I honestly made it only halfway through the book before I had to put it down. The story was dragging on by the time I put it down. I already could tell that things like the marriage would not take place for a very long time. The return of Darken Raul I thought to be kind of lame. It seems the author is already trying to milk the story for more books, rather than push a stronger plot. The final straw was the grotesque perverse explicit sex. I thought form reading the first that I could see where G I honestly made it only halfway through the book before I had to put it down. The story was dragging on by the time I put it down. I already could tell that things like the marriage would not take place for a very long time. The return of Darken Raul I thought to be kind of lame. It seems the author is already trying to milk the story for more books, rather than push a stronger plot. The final straw was the grotesque perverse explicit sex. I thought form reading the first that I could see where Goodkind was drawing the line at what he would put in the book. I was regretfully very wrong. I did find the irony funny that Goodkind goes to the trouble to create fake vulgarity, not even showing all of it, then goes on to show scenes of such perversion as to offend anyone with decency. I'm sure that as an author he views it his mission to offend everyone he can, and he has succeeded with this reader at least.

  7. 4 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    It is always curious to see fantasy authors who don't consider themselves to be fantasy authors. Case-in-point: Terry Goodkind. The former landscape painter has told us how he isn't a fantasy author in every interview he's ever given: "The books I write are first of all novels, not fantasy, and that is deliberate; I'm really writing books about human beings."(1) "To define me as a fantasy writer is to misunderstand the context of my books by misidentifying their fundamentals."(2) "The stories I'm t It is always curious to see fantasy authors who don't consider themselves to be fantasy authors. Case-in-point: Terry Goodkind. The former landscape painter has told us how he isn't a fantasy author in every interview he's ever given: "The books I write are first of all novels, not fantasy, and that is deliberate; I'm really writing books about human beings."(1) "To define me as a fantasy writer is to misunderstand the context of my books by misidentifying their fundamentals."(2) "The stories I'm telling are not fantasy-driven, they're character-driven, and the characters I want to write about could be set in any world. I'd like to address a broader audience."(3) ""What I have done with my work has irrevocably changed the face of fantasy. In so doing I've raised the standards. I have not only injected thought into a tired empty genre, but, more importantly, I've transcended it showing what more it can be . . ." Then the interview usually devolves into a discussion of Ayn Rand and 'the meaning of art', just in case you missed the pretension of declaring fantasy books 'not fantasy!' The guy certainly has a chip on his shoulder, but it makes me wonder whether he has actually read any fantasy. He doesn't seem to realize that the things he claims separate him from fantasy are fundamental parts of how modern fantasy works. A novel that's fundamentally about character interactions with a magical setting? How droll. Goodkind doesn't reinventing the novel; he doesn't even reinvent the fantasy novel, he just twists the knobs to get a little more steam out of it. Michael Moorcock critiqued Tolkien as a false romantic, which is rather apt considering that his love story takes place almost entirely in absentia (prompting Peter Jackson to infuse some extra loving with a hot, elven, psychic dream sequence). Most fantasy authors rectify this by having the girl come along for the journey. Goodkind likes to keep the separation for much of the story as our hero tries to seek her out across a continent (though she is often just in the next room! Oh! What a tragic coincidence!) Actually, after the first time it's just an annoying and painfully artificial way to try to hold off the conclusion for another hundred pages. It's a good thing Terry doesn't have to rely on magical or artificial means to keep his stories fresh! The rest of the time, the hero finds the girl and lovingly transfixes her on his mighty sword. No, really. I'm not sure why these authors always end up feeling as if they have to dump their sex fetish issues at this particular juncture: "Huh, I dig BDSM. Maybe I should confide my fantasies in a book for mass publication". I cannot think of a single female character in the entire series who isn't either raped or threatened with rape. If you want to give me an example of one, remember: I'm counting magical psychic blowjob rape as rape. I wish I never had the opportunity to qualify a statement with 'don't forget the psychic blowjob rape'. I don't mind actual BDSM literature, but I'd rather have my own reaction to it than be told "isn't it totally dirty and wrong!? (but still super sexy, right?)" Porn for porn's sake is fine, but remember, Goodkind isn't some escapist fantasy author, these are 'real stories about real people' so he has to act like his magic porn is somehow a reflection of real life. Goodkind's books are cookie-cutter genre fantasy, but the first few aren't that badly done, and if you like people narrowly missing one another, bondage, masochism, rape, and dragons, it might work for you, but the series dies on arrival part-way through, so prepare for disappointment. If you are enjoying the series, you should probably avoid reading any of his interviews, as he rarely misses an opportunity to claim that he is superior to all other fantasy authors, and never compare him to Robert Jordan, because "If you notice a similarity, then you probably aren't old enough to read my books."(4) Goodkind truly lives in his own fantasy world if he thinks his mediocre genre re-hash is 'original' or 'deep'. Then again, I've never met an adherent of Ayn Rand who didn't consider themselves a brilliant and unique snowflake trapped in a world of people who 'just don't understand'. The Randian philosophies are also laid on pretty thickly in his books, but at least he found a substitute grandmother figure to help him justify his Gorean sex-romp as 'high art'. All in all, he's just another guy who likes to hear himself talk. Despite what he says, nothing separates his work from the average modern fantasy author, and like them, his greatest failing is the complete lack of self-awareness that overwhelms his themes, plots, and characters. My Fantasy Book Suggestions

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Stone of Tears, much like its predecessor in the Sword of Truth series, was an entertaining story written in mediocre words. The whole of the book -- or at least every other page -- is filled with sensational imagery and description. Everything about the characters and the events is passionate, desperate, and extreme. It gets a little tiring. Even so, I enjoyed reading how various prophecies unfolded in twisted ways, I loved the boyish friendship between Richard and Gratch, and I even wept at the Stone of Tears, much like its predecessor in the Sword of Truth series, was an entertaining story written in mediocre words. The whole of the book -- or at least every other page -- is filled with sensational imagery and description. Everything about the characters and the events is passionate, desperate, and extreme. It gets a little tiring. Even so, I enjoyed reading how various prophecies unfolded in twisted ways, I loved the boyish friendship between Richard and Gratch, and I even wept at the conclusion of the sub-story of Adie and her Pell. If you enjoy magic and danger, this book is a decent yarn to entertain you between more taxing literary challenges.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Meels

    Okay, I'm going to have to give you all a little bit of background information before I can give my review of this book, so bare with me! This last spring my husband and I decided to get another cat, a kitten to be exact. We already have two and knowing that this will probably label us the "crazy cat people" of the neighborhood we decide to go ahead and do it anyway. Our oldest cat is, well, a bitch and hates the sweet fat cat with a vengeance. Tas (aka The Fat Man) seemed a bit sad and we wanted Okay, I'm going to have to give you all a little bit of background information before I can give my review of this book, so bare with me! This last spring my husband and I decided to get another cat, a kitten to be exact. We already have two and knowing that this will probably label us the "crazy cat people" of the neighborhood we decide to go ahead and do it anyway. Our oldest cat is, well, a bitch and hates the sweet fat cat with a vengeance. Tas (aka The Fat Man) seemed a bit sad and we wanted to get him a kitten to play with and nap with and generally buddy around with. I insist on a rescue kitten, no pet store kittens, Larry agrees. So we find the most ADORABLE little (part I'm sure) main coon and bring her home. She's an extremely loving kitty that likes to sleep right under my chin. That's were the first spot appeared. I hardly noticed it, other than the itching. I figured I'd been bitten by a bug...then I got one on my arm! I freak out and make an emergency vet appointment, which Larry thinks is a huge over reaction. Sure enough...the rescue kitten has ringworm ! Apparently cats, when they have ringworm, produce spores and shoot them all over your house, bed, carpet, couch, blankets, pillows, hardwoods...anywhere they can manage to get to. These spores, according to the vet, are highly contagious and can live up to a year in you carpet etc. A YEAR! June, July and most of August is spent with our house quarantined. For weeks I am lathering up cats with lotions and shampoo. Have you ever tried to shampoo your cat? Well, if you have, imagine that you have to let the anti-fungal shampoo sit on them for 10 minutes before you wash it off. Yeah right. If you didn't already know, ringworm is actually a fungus, like athletes foot...on YOUR FACE ! Or, arms, legs, whatever. At one point I was going to work with at least 20 of those little round band-aids stuck all over my arms and legs. It was ridiculous, I was getting new spots every single day! I was obsessed with washing, mopping, vacuuming...like when your kid brings home lice from elementary school. You know there was nothing you could have done to prevent it, you know you are a clean person, but everything feels...dirty. For weeks after the spots were gone and we'd shampooed the carpets I was still slathering Lotrimin on anything that remotely felt like it might be an itch, just.in.case! I said all that to say this, I would gladly go through that all again, start to finish rather than ever have to read this book again! It only gets two stars, because I am the biggest sucker that ever lived for a happy ending. In that, Mr. Goodkind (Oh, the irony of that name!) did not disappoint. It was as happy and icky sweet as you could possibly ever want and more. I'm pretty sure Mr. Goodkind has to be a closet sexual sadist. Nearly every woman in the book was either raped or nearly raped, someone attempted to rape her or promised to rape her but simply didn't live long enough. It started in the first book with the rape and torture, but this book took it to a whole other level. Torture is also a pretty constant theme, hence the sexual sadist rather than wanna be rapist. It got to the point that it was actually wearing on me, starting to annoy me and then even piss me off. His picture at the back of the book didn't help, it was the most smarmy, self important, arrogant picture I've ever seen of an author (that I can recall). Unfortunately I accidentally saw it rather early on in the book (all 900 or so bloody pages!) and I have to admit that it did taint my reading experience in a VERY bad way. Photo of which I speak: http://aidanmoher.com/blog/wp-content... Of course, he was horribly repetitive and overly descriptive, even more so than in the first book. I think that part of the reason I liked book one so much better was that I hadn't yet seen the above photo and I had watched the entire first season of The Legend of the Seeker, a poor Sci-Fi Channel adaptation of the book and the book was so much better that it seemed not too bad. Unfortunately for the second book I wasn't able to stomach the second season of the show and therefore had nothing worse to compare it to. You know how annoying it is when someone learns a new vocabulary word and insists on using it at every given opportunity until you begin to hate that person and by association that word? As if the word has some how done something to you, personally, offended you so grievously that you now loath that word and cringe when you hear it? Well, Mr. Goodkind, at some point around 200 pages in had this epiphany that if the word "invincible" meant immune to harm then "vincible" was just as good of a word for "vulnerable"! He used it so often that it once appeared twice in the same paragraph and three times on one page! I now completely hate the word "vincible" and eventually had trouble restraining myself from scratching it off the page! What also occurred to me while reading this was that it read more like a romance novel with some wizards 'n junk than it did a fantasy novel with some romance thrown in. The whole deal with the collar and "she doesn't love me anymore" boo hoo crap. Gah! I had to skip huge swaths at the end where he rambled on for a page of description for him getting from one end of the palace to the other. Who does he think he is Herman Melville? Let me put it into context for you, Davey. If David Eddings (a contemporary fantasy writer of Goodkind) is The Cure, then Terry Goodkind is Julian Lennon. They're both English and were recording at the same time. One is fabulous and the other makes you want to claw at your own ears, or eyes in the case of Mr. Goodkind. I read a review of his first book by this girl who's boyfriend wanted her to read it. Out of love for him she tried, but said that she would rather "smell her dogs breath and then lick his teeth than read that book". I anorted. I now know exactly how she feels.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel C.

    Trigger warning. Oh man! I filled both sides of an envelope with incomprehensible scribblings about how much this book sucked. I want to see how far I can get without referring to it, and then we'll see just how much I have forgotten. It's hard to say how long I can take this. What was this book, like 900 pages? 979, it seems. There are ten more in the series. 9000 pages, huh? Each one of these is more than half as long as War and Peace. Christ. While I was googling to try to figure that out, I r Trigger warning. Oh man! I filled both sides of an envelope with incomprehensible scribblings about how much this book sucked. I want to see how far I can get without referring to it, and then we'll see just how much I have forgotten. It's hard to say how long I can take this. What was this book, like 900 pages? 979, it seems. There are ten more in the series. 9000 pages, huh? Each one of these is more than half as long as War and Peace. Christ. While I was googling to try to figure that out, I ran into a blog with Terry Goodkind quotes that indicate he's as full of himself as he seems in his authorial voice. Wow, he's just breathtakingly deluded if he thinks of himself as anything other than a tired hack regurgitating the same weak stew that has kept fantasy in business for the last fifty years or more. So let me start with his obsession with children of rape. The rape itself is really disturbing, both his insistent focus on it and his extremely careful assurance that none of the main characters be violated in this way. I don't mean disturbing in any literary sense. I mean disturbing in making me wonder what Terry Goodkind thinks about over there in the Western U.S. all the time. The weird prostitute thing doesn't help. I totally agree that some people would be into prostitutes and a ton of casual sex if all that were available to them. But the idea that every single wizard, every single guardsman, whatever, would not just be into prostitutes, but be so into them that they'd drop their duties for a dude who'd buy them hookers... (Let me not get into the unbelievability of the premise that no one else had considered doing this, say, the Sisters of the Dark for one... I'm trying to talk about his sexuality here). Does he think that basically every man everywhere is ruled only by his libido? Every evil man? It's a very strange idea that all the refugees from a sacked city would be raped women. If everyone is supposed to be dead, then let everyone be dead. It's just strange, he doesn't just want rape to be part of the plot, he wants to dwell on the rape, almost lovingly. The way one persons hands are tied. The way another is bent over a piece of furniture. Okay, and the repetitive use of children of rape as a thing. Women who think of themselves as violated, who are counseled by the wise protagonist to think of pregnancy as a gift, who eventually, humbled, come to agree. Sounds rotten, really rotten, to me. Okay, what else? I don't want this to be all about the sex. It's incredibly tedious, the insistence on monogamy. I thought for just the shortest of instants there was going to be a chance with the weird noble savage arranged marriage thing, but of course not. Well, he has 10 more books to suck less. Yeah right. The blogger has sunk my hope of that. Here's another terrible little thing. How about you're an intelligent humanoid, maybe a little stupider than a human, way smarter than an animal. Let's say that you're a baby and someone comes along and kills your mother in front of you. How about you fixate on that person, love that person with an unconditional, unrequited, all-consuming love for the rest of your life. How about that? All right, I'm sick of guessing, let's see what else I've got. Oh yeah, how about, man, oh man, how about you're new in town, you've caused a bunch of people to die, and when someone complains, you tell them if they open their mouth even to apologize for the rest of the day, you'll kill them? And mean it. That sounds really cool. How about the symbolism of having the sisters of the light not knowing anything about horses, loving their hierarchy so much that they don't know anything outside of it. That's not a straw man, I'd bet. The characterization of bad guys in general is terrible. They're all deluded fools devoted to the Keeper, half mad and all violent. There is not a hint of nuance. Man this book is disappearing in a haze! These notes mean nothing to me. Oh, more noxious things. The good guys laughing it up at the idea of hanging a man to death for swearing in front of the queen. Good guys losing their shit in anger that someone else did something they didn't know was wrong because they weren't warned. Good guys keeping stupid, stupid secrets from one another. Let's turn to the plot. There are so many holes! I won't list all the people who know things they couldn't or the people who don't know things they must. Let's not discuss the many, many, examples of people impetuously stepping on their own feet by rushing into situations and doing something without checking the situation first. You'd think that people who were trained to lead and used to the yoke of rulership would learn not to do that. Maybe by book seven. No, let's focus on the big ones. The Dei ex machina. Need to get somewhere really fast? Here. Need to break this evil old spell? There. Need to flush out a coven? Destroy an invading army? Done, done, done. The more I write here, the more afraid I am of what I'll find when I turn to the Wheel of Time, which I still remember with fondness. I think the only trash fantasy I still remember with actual fondness is that series and just the Magician books by R. E. Feist, nothing past that first book (or two books whatever).

  11. 5 out of 5

    StoryTellerShannon

    A huge disappointment after the first novel. I got through about half of this novel (hundreds of pages) before I felt all the meandering of the main tale and the love story were making the tale bland. After my glowing review of his first book I reluctantly gave up on this one and the rest of the series. OVERALL GRADE: C minus to C; WHEN READ: 2001 (reviewed early April 2012).

  12. 4 out of 5

    George Straatman

    Warning: this review is fueled by seething frustration. I must admit that I did not actually finish this book, but rather did what I rarely do and cast it aside in utter frustration and bewilderment. My attraction to fantasy…as both a writer and fan…is rooted in the belief that fantasy is the most creative genre where constraints are virtually non-existent. To my dismay, I am finding that this is often anything but the case. While it is true that there are intriguing new worlds, systems of magic Warning: this review is fueled by seething frustration. I must admit that I did not actually finish this book, but rather did what I rarely do and cast it aside in utter frustration and bewilderment. My attraction to fantasy…as both a writer and fan…is rooted in the belief that fantasy is the most creative genre where constraints are virtually non-existent. To my dismay, I am finding that this is often anything but the case. While it is true that there are intriguing new worlds, systems of magic and cultures aplenty...a sizable portion of the fantasy offerings dust off and propagate the imbecilic notions that have made the four step death dance the most popular movement in human history. I was sickened by the king and country tripe espoused in Kay’s Tigana, but even that did not adequately prepare me for Terry Goodkind’s Stone of Tears. After reading through 570 pages of the second novel of this series, I can only conclude that this author is an idiot of Himalayan proportions. Never in all of the years that I’ve been reading have I encountered a protagonist who openly advocates genocide and absolute racial cleansing. Goodkind kind repeats this vile act, not once, but twice. The Jokopo race is annihilated to a one by the mud people and this act of cleansing is justified by the theory that these people are inherently bad and must be effaced from history…Kahlan Amnall (who along with Richard Cypher/Rahl could well be the most annoying pair of protagonists that I’ve ever encountered. Though Goodkind attempts to paint their great love in shades of Romeo and Juliet, he fails wretchedly.) and her insidious rhetoric to the Galeans that they must kill every soldier of the Imperial order to a man was the last straw (exacerbated by her insistence that the cavalry horses must have their legs broken and those who disagreed with her strategy of a war of obliteration should also be killed to a one). All of this slaughter is undertaken in the name of rightful vengeance, honor and the lofty ideals of the grievously offended without ever a thought that descending to the same level creates the same monster. To openly espouse total ethic cleansing as the legitimate action of supposedly moral people is vile. If this is any indication of his personal belief, Goodkind would have had the victors of the Second World War order the extermination of every living Japanese and German survivor. Goodkind is technically a very capable writer, but to propagate this kind of tripe is odious and he should be ashamed. The worst part of this is that I received all eleven novels as a Christmas present. I give this novel a 1/5

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    A couple years back I read the first book in the Sword of Truth series, Wizard’s First Rule, and it made me get all ranty and weird. But long story short: even though the book featured some of the most naive and derivative writing I’ve ever seen (at points, it was positively juvenile), and even though a large part of it read like a BDSM wet dream, I enjoyed reading it. It remains to this day one of the most batshit things I’ve ever read. So here I was reading book two, Stone of Tears, which I as A couple years back I read the first book in the Sword of Truth series, Wizard’s First Rule, and it made me get all ranty and weird. But long story short: even though the book featured some of the most naive and derivative writing I’ve ever seen (at points, it was positively juvenile), and even though a large part of it read like a BDSM wet dream, I enjoyed reading it. It remains to this day one of the most batshit things I’ve ever read. So here I was reading book two, Stone of Tears, which I assumed from its absurd length, was just as batshit as the first one. Hooray! Let’s just say I wasn’t wrong. Stone of Tears follows the newly minted Seeker of Truth, Richard Cypher — fresh from saving the world from the evil Darken Rahl, who of course turned out to be his father, but he doesn’t know that yet! — and his one true love, the Mother Confessor (don't ask) Kahlan Amnell, as they go from the brink of happily ever after to HOLY SHIT THE WORLD IS ENDING AND IT’S ALL OUR FAULT in the blink of an eye. After getting their happy ending in Wizard’s First Rule, the two are separated by vast distances and improbable plot points, as Richard is taken away on the eve of their wedding by the mysterious and sinister Sisters of the Light, who profess to be teachers of wizards, and claim that unless he comes with them to their super duper secret palace in a land of far away, his burgeoning magical powers will kill him. So after forcing Richard to leave her — with that age old thing that isn’t actually a thing in real life but only in bad fiction, where a person shoves another person away, making them believe I DON’T REALLY LOVE YOU, so as to save their life, instead of being calm and rational about it and being all hey, I don’t know, honest? and maybe saying things like, “hey, Richard, I know you hate collars and all and it makes you feel like you’re back in the bad rapey place, but I love you and I don’t want you to die, so you’re going to go with these creepy women, okay?” But no, it’s, “I don’t really love you! Leave me! And you obviously don’t love me if you won’t do what I say!” Completely and utterly moronic. So Richard goes off to study with these motherfuckers and he' s completely hostile the whole time and acting like an idiot, while Kahlan heads off to find Richard's grandfather, getting waylaid along the way by war in the Midlands by an Imperial army that is such an anti-democracy stand-in it's not even funny (cue a mini Ayn Rand lesson in the middle of my silly fantasy novel -- Terry Goodkind is a professed libertarian). Then Darken Rahl sort of comes back from the dead and the underworld threatens to eat the world of the living unless IMPORTANT RICHARD OF THE PROPHECIES can get his shit together. You know, fun stuff like that. Things get weirder from there, and so much crap happens it would be a waste of time for me to write it all out, not to mention you probably wouldn't even believe me because so much weird shit happens in this book -- like, rapey shit and junk -- it's almost surreal. Goodkind does manage to pull the whole thing into narrative form somehow by the end, which is frankly a miracle, but just barely. Unbelievably, I think the writing has actually devolved since the first book. Or, at least it felt like it at points. In reality, Goodkind is the same ponytailed dude writing the same overly seriously ponytailed things. My reaction probably has more to do with the joy of discovery being gone. You know, that feeling you get when you're entering a new fictional world that goes something like, "Oh! This is here! What is this new thing? My brain feels pleasant right now!"? For a good chunk of Stone of Tears, that sense of discovery is missing, and in its place Terry Goodkind substitutes mind-numbing repetition, both of dialogue and of situations, mostly to do with the love story between our heroes, Richard and Kahlan. When he's describing the rules of his world, or introducing certain characters, and certainly in his descriptions of battle in the Midlands, the book is interesting, even very interesting at points. But it takes Goodkind twice as long as a more talented author to get his point across most of the time because the dude doesn't understand the concept of subtlety. If he was about to be eaten by a giant slavering tiger and the only thing that could save him was understanding the concept of subtlety, Terry Goodkind would get eaten by the tiger. He just. Doesn't. Get it. It literally LITERALLY takes him pages of having characters repeat the same information over and over to even have them communicate in basic language with each other. Sometimes he, again literally, has characters repeat exactly what they just said the sentence before, but in a different form. He also falls into the juvenile writing traps of having characters say each others' names constantly, and having characters say exactly what they mean at all times. These are characters with no inner lives, because they are constantly taking all of their thoughts and screaming them to the world. It is super annoying. On top of all this mess -- there's just too much mess for me to even deal with properly in this review -- his characters not only talk stupid, but they're constantly doing stupid things for no reason except that the plot demands it, and more often than not, we're left with a hero who vacillates between incredible stupidity and superhuman nobility and competence, with nothing in between. The book is about two hundred pages too long, and almost none of the characters speak like they are real people. All together, it is just so freaking weird. There were some good tings about the book. There would have to be in order for me to keep going. That thing is like 979 fucking pages long. I mentioned that I liked his action scenes, and I do have to commend him for creating Kahlan Amnell because she is a fucking badass (and I do really love the concept of the Confessors). Some of his other characters are pretty good as well (like Zedd), even as others are completely awful (i.e. Rachel, has Terry Goodkind even met a child before?). But I think mostly the reason I kept going, and the reason I will probably read the rest of the series eventually (besides having an OCD story completion fetish) is that I can appreciate the vast scope of the world Goodkind has created, and that even though I believe him to be unskilled as a writer, the world he has created lives on in spite of him. This thing is an undeniable feat of imagination, and there ain't nothing in this world I love more than the possibilities of the imagination. Final verdict, 2.5 stars.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Some of you may say that the writing is bad. I'd say not great but not bad either. Some of you may say the characters are a bit whiny and the dialogues a little kiddish. I'd have to agree with that. Then why the hell 5 stars?! you'll ask. I'd say: 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 for a damn good story! Original and entertaining from beginning to end! 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 for magic and prophecies, for love and friendship, for bravery and sacrifice! and last but by far not least 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 for Gratch!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rob Towell

    This series as a whole is very good. I found that once I picked up the first book I flew through the whole series, stopping only when I read the last one out. I then continued reading as they came out. When I started reading them their was only five books, now that the series is complete we can set the whole thing into some perspective. I will be happy to see the TV show starting fall of 2008 and hope it is as good as the books. On the less than benign side, the author does tend to stop telling t This series as a whole is very good. I found that once I picked up the first book I flew through the whole series, stopping only when I read the last one out. I then continued reading as they came out. When I started reading them their was only five books, now that the series is complete we can set the whole thing into some perspective. I will be happy to see the TV show starting fall of 2008 and hope it is as good as the books. On the less than benign side, the author does tend to stop telling the story and start preaching pretty often in the books. The books were written by a Moral Relativist in the style of Ann Rand and he tends to spend what seems to be about 20% of each book preaching this message of Objectivism. As someone solid in my faith and not very sensitive to other view points it did not affect me and I was able to continue reading, however I have met people who hated it based solely on the authors preaching and others who loved it for the same. The Books bounce from Great to below average and back up to great again as you read through the series. I found Wizards First Rule, Blood of the Fold and Faith of the fallen were all five star books worth every minute spent reading them. While Stone of Tears, Soul of the Fire and Naked Empire were a waste of time all together. The rest of the series I would consider a three star series worth the time to read, but nothing special. A strength of the Author is that he has the ability to articulate well and balances the need to describe a setting whether it be a city tavern or palace with enough detail for you to feel like you are there while not rambling on forever without focus. His ability to engage you in the emotion of the character at the time and create exciting scenes of both political and martial nature is impressive. I plan to read his other books as soon as I get a chance. A weakness of the author is he seems to give the Protagonist powers and abilities just so he can think of a way to take them away. It also seems that all the other characters in the book only exist as contrast for the Protagonist (Richard). Also the scope of power available to the characters varies greatly by plot and this can be very frustrating if you keep track of stuff like that. Or if you are like me and try to solve the problem in you mind before seeing what the protagonist does. My only technical peeve with these books was the inconsistent nature of the way Magic/Powers worked and how they interrelate, which also focused heavily on every new power introduce was a trump over every other power. All in all though there are good and bad things in these books they are overall very good.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ariela

    “Stone of Tears” is the second book in Terry Goodkind’s “Sword of Truth” series and it is every bit as good as its predecessor, “Wizard’s First Rule.” After the big reveal about Richard’s heritage at the end of Book 1, the opening of Book 2 seamlessly moves forward with more magical intrigue and adventure. It all begins with an unexpectedly brutal battle in D’Hara, where Zedd discovers that something magical has gone horribly wrong. He knows that Richard is the one who needs to get to the bottom “Stone of Tears” is the second book in Terry Goodkind’s “Sword of Truth” series and it is every bit as good as its predecessor, “Wizard’s First Rule.” After the big reveal about Richard’s heritage at the end of Book 1, the opening of Book 2 seamlessly moves forward with more magical intrigue and adventure. It all begins with an unexpectedly brutal battle in D’Hara, where Zedd discovers that something magical has gone horribly wrong. He knows that Richard is the one who needs to get to the bottom of things, but Richard and Kahlan have left for the village of the Mud People. Their plan: to indulge in some much-needed relaxation and to prepare for their upcoming wedding. Everything is going well until Richard begins suffering from crippling headaches and three women known as Sisters of Light show up, warning Richard that his headaches are caused by his magical “gift.” As his power grows his headaches will become worse, eventually proving fatal unless he learns to control his magic. The sisters claim that Richard must wear a Rada’Han – a magical collar that controls his gift – then follow them into the Old World in order to receive the training he needs. He is reluctant to agree to their terms, but eventually he’s left with no other choice. Kahlan stays behind with the Mud People and Richard leaves with the sisters, but unbeknownst to them this will put the fate of the entire world in jeopardy. During his battle against Darken Rahl in Book 1, Richard accidentally tore the veil between the world of the living and the underworld. According to prophecy, Richard is the only one who can seal the veil and place the Stone of Tears back on the Keeper, preventing the evil fiend from escaping into the world. At nearly 1,000 pages long, “Stone of Tears” isn’t a light read but it is an engrossing one. Just as with the first book I read this story late into the night, even when I had to get up early the next morning. There were a few slow chapters but for the most part the plot moves right along, aided by relatable characters and the increasingly fascinating mythology of Richard’s sword, the Sword of Truth.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    3.0 Stars. Good (if very long) sequel to Wizard's First Rule. Expanded the scope of the overall story and continued to add depth to the characters. The magic system is very compelling though the writing is often clunky and can sting the ears. Still, a good solid read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eric Allen

    An Opinionated Look at: Terry Goodkind's Sword of Truth Book 2: Stone of Tears By Eric Allen Well, I said there might be a bit of time between reviews in this series since I'm not being paid to do this anymore. Apparently I meant it. It's been, what, 4 months since I posted the last one? Anyway, for a very long time Stone of Tears was my favorite book in the series, right up until Faith of the Fallen came out and bumped it down to number 2, where it remains to this day on my list of favorites in th An Opinionated Look at: Terry Goodkind's Sword of Truth Book 2: Stone of Tears By Eric Allen Well, I said there might be a bit of time between reviews in this series since I'm not being paid to do this anymore. Apparently I meant it. It's been, what, 4 months since I posted the last one? Anyway, for a very long time Stone of Tears was my favorite book in the series, right up until Faith of the Fallen came out and bumped it down to number 2, where it remains to this day on my list of favorites in the series. I really do love this book, even though there are many things in it that I utterly abhor. For example, there is more violence against women in this book than all of George R. R. Martin's entire written library combined. These are things that as a male teenaged high school student didn't strike me as all that bad, but as I got older and hopefully wiser, I find to be pretty horrifying and in rather bad taste. This book would have gotten 5 stars if only it had just known when to tone it down a little bit. We begin what seems like mere minutes after the previous book ended. There seems to be great trouble with the Underworld, and Zedd takes off to enlist the help of Addie, who is the most knowledgeable person he knows on the subject, to try and put things right again. Meanwhile, Richard and Kahlan return to the Mud People because reasons, and make plans for their wedding. But, it seems that killing Darken Rahl in the previous book has activated Richard's innate magical abilities, and these abilities are now killing him. Enter three Sisters of the Light and long story short, Richard is taken away to learn magic while Kahlan heads north back to the midlands only to find an army doing horrible evil things. The Good? While there isn't much improvement in the writing over the first book, the quality doesn't really go down in this book. It's still pretty well written, if clunky at times. I think this one could have used maybe a little more editorial influence, but as a whole, the writing is pretty good for someone who had only written one book ever at the time of it's publication. (including unpublished works) The world, which was magical and mysterious in the first book has been expanded upon greatly in this book, adding in more of the Midlands, more of how governments work, more of how magic works, and we see more locations and things to make it feel a lot less like a few scattered towns in a vast wilderness as it sort of did in the first book. It gives the book, and the series, a far more epic scope and feeling to it. There are some pretty amazing action scenes in this book. Kahlan's nighttime raid on the Imperial Order. Awesome. Richard vs. Lilianna. Awesome. Sisters of the Dark vs. everyone. Awesome. Something I've always liked about this series is that the solution to the conflict in one book will often be the direct cause of the conflict in the next one. I've always liked the cause and effect sort of thing Goodkind tries to implement in his stories. Every action has a reaction. Everything you do has consequences even if you can't see them at the time. It's a pretty good lesson to learn in life, and a pretty entertaining way of trying to teach it. The Bad? The beginning of this book is kind of a mess. It jumps around all over the place, and a lot of what's happening just isn't all that interesting or exciting, and it takes quite a while for things to really start moving at all. We have characters we've never seen before showing up just to give long stretches of exposition. Action scenes that are somewhat out of context, and therefore also somewhat boring. We have characters revisiting places they've already been and doing things they've already done. It probably could have been handled better, but Goodkind was a relatively inexperienced writer at the time, so it's forgivable. This is part of the reason I said this book could have maybe used a little bit more editorial influence in it. A good editor could have sat down with Goodkind and tried to sort some of the mess at the beginning of this book out, and maybe made it a little more exciting and enjoyable. There are some very, very uncomfortable moments in this book. Moments when characters do or say things that are pretty horrible, and not usually what you would be expecting the heroes of a story to do or say. When Kahlan makes Richard put the collar on for instance. That scene is pretty painful. Kahlan down in the pit. That one's pretty bad too. Verna flat out giving her blessing to the murder of the innocent, or stabbing one of her best friends in the back? These people are supposed to be our heroes? The romantic plot in this book is pretty cheesy. It's better than the constant one-note, OMG we love each other but we can never be together line we heard 73,000 times in the first book, but it's still pretty clunky. And the resolution to the conflict in the love story is pretty heavy handed and laughable too. There's more cheese in this book than Wisconsin. Now, there's two ways you can really look at it. As something to be constantly annoyed by, or as part of the book's charm. I prefer the latter. I know I'm reading an extremely cheesy story, and I enjoy it for what it is, rather than complaining about it. Of course, if your tolerance for cheese is low, you're probably going to want to skip this one. The Ugly? Again, the violence against women in this book is so over the top into horrors out of H.P Lovecraft's worst nightmares, that it really puts a stain on the rest of the book. It drives home how evil the Imperial Order is, but it is extraordinarily offensive, crass, and frankly childish of the author to have done so in such a way, and in such vivid detail. There are other, better ways to show how evil people are than to show the aftermath of an entire city's worth of women raped to death. Honestly! Kahlan in the pit is another pretty offensive part to get through. Instead of, oh, I don't know, using some of that awesome martial arts training she displayed so often in the first book to bring the hurt on and buy her enough time to figure out what's wrong with her power, she lets the guy grope her? Really? Bad, Terry Goodkind. Bad! No treat for you. THAT'S NOT HOW WOMEN THINK OR ACT!!! Honestly, I used to think he was good at writing strong female characters... now I'm starting to wonder what I must have been smoking when I thought that. There were just a whole lot of horrifying, terribly offensive things toward women in this book that really didn't even need to be there at all. Anyway, in conclusion, the beginning of this book is pretty clunky and terribly put together, the book is unrepentantly cheesy, the love story has some really stupidly artificial tension tossed into it and it's resolved in such a cliche way, and the violence against women is pretty over the top. However, despite it's flaws I still enjoy it quite a bit. It's still my second favorite book in the series, though having reread it, I'm starting to see where some of the bad writing and terrible storytelling decisions Goodkind made in future volumes came from. If you liked the first one, and can stomach a ridiculous amount of sexual violence (or better yet just skip it entirely because it adds exactly nothing to the story), this is a pretty good followup. But, again, this series is not for everyone. It carries a pretty strong "R" rating,if not an "NC-17", for extreme violence, much of which is against women, sexual content, and detailed, graphic descriptions of gore, rape, other sexual violence, and so on. Check out my other reviews.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gwen (The Gwendolyn Reading Method)

    Uh, parts of this were just fine but the romantic parts were so saccharine I wanted to gouge my eyes out and I'm a person who can only be described as a super-mega romance reader... I loved book 1, but this one I could barely get through.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Angrboda

    This has to be one of the most awful books I've ever subjected myself to. There were trouble already with the first book in the series, but I foolishly thought it might get better. I've listened to about a fifth of this audiobook now and that's just about as much as I can stomach.j Really we can divide the entire series up in four parts so far. About 20% crying. These characters cry constantly. Every little thing has them bawling their eyes out. At times I felt like I was about to drown in tears. A This has to be one of the most awful books I've ever subjected myself to. There were trouble already with the first book in the series, but I foolishly thought it might get better. I've listened to about a fifth of this audiobook now and that's just about as much as I can stomach.j Really we can divide the entire series up in four parts so far. About 20% crying. These characters cry constantly. Every little thing has them bawling their eyes out. At times I felt like I was about to drown in tears. About 10% sex, and so far not one instance of it being consensual. Not ONE. Seriously every time any man who isn't Richard sees a woman she becomes prey. About 20% Wheel of Time. The Sisters of Light was what finally made me give up in disgust. It's Aes Sedai all over again, complete with Mistress of Novices, angreal, black Ajah, the lot. Lifted completely from WoT, it seems to me, and altered clumsily to fit this story instead. About 50% violence and torture, and revelling in it in a way that rather makes me worry for the mental health of Mr Goodkind. Every time someone is being trained for anything at all, it's through torture. Threats are thrown about all over the place. One character is even told by Richard at one point that if he opens his mouth to say anything at all for the rest of the day, even an apology, he will die. And Richard is supposed to be the good guy... At the point where I decided I'd had rather enough, one man was about to skin his best friend alive, and as a reward he gets to seduce a girl who didn't have a say in the matter. He is even told how to manipulate her into letting him. And all the way through, it has this feel of someone's fantasy being played out and the impression of the author going 'wow, yeah, cool!' at particularly gory bits. It's amazing some of these characters even have a single drop of blood left in them at all. I would say that it was amazing any of them were even sane, but sanity seems to be in short supply already in this book, so perhaps there wasn't really that much of it to lose in the first place... Every single woman in this book seems to be a blood thirsty animal and every single man seems to be a potential sexual predator. All in all, the world building here is horrid. I definitely wouldn't want to live in it, not one bit. Even places that are supposed to be peaceful sound pretty awful. There's no balance to it at all. Honestly if it was me having to 'save the world' in this book, I'd probably just leave it to sort it out for itself, because I can't really see much worth saving. Horrible book. Absolutely the most awful dreck.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ricardo Portillo

    Apparently, I have two things going against me liking Goodkind's books, 1) I have read Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series prior to starting the Sword of Truth and 2) my threshold for misogyny is not sociopathic. I am quite aware that Robert Jordan himself is sub-par and works off of Tolkien and Frank Herbert etc., but at least he used some discretion and tact. But Goodkind, my lord, he just rips off ad nauseam from Jordan's constructs and mythologies. Always staying strategically one inch away Apparently, I have two things going against me liking Goodkind's books, 1) I have read Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series prior to starting the Sword of Truth and 2) my threshold for misogyny is not sociopathic. I am quite aware that Robert Jordan himself is sub-par and works off of Tolkien and Frank Herbert etc., but at least he used some discretion and tact. But Goodkind, my lord, he just rips off ad nauseam from Jordan's constructs and mythologies. Always staying strategically one inch away from legally defined plagiarism. And he doesn't even do anything with what he rips off! Every character is just a robotic cutout, following a script designed to (try) to make the reader feel something, regardless of how the character would act in "real life". Now as for the women-hating, geez. Every young woman is raped (if you are not Kahlan) or almost raped (if you are Kahlan), and/or prostitute's themselves for personal or society's gain. If there were a valuable message from all this I guess it would be ok, but there is none! It is completely gratuitous and, more disturbingly, seemingly meant to titillate in some cases. So far in this series the *only* battered woman I've found worth reading about is Denna. With Denna, Goodkind at least tries to explore the psyche of a woman who has gone through such ordeals. But that's the extent of his merits, after that he just uses misogyny as an easy and lazy way to get the reader riled up. He apparently does not have the talent to provoke the reader in any other way. Finally, then I start reading about the author, the interviews, etc. He is not a likable person. There is a seediness that permeates this author and his writing. He is a machiavellian and misogynistic delusional douche. I think that sums up Goodkind in a nutshell.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    +970 pages. Have you ever watched a movie that was paced and characterized well until the very end? Then it wraps-up so quickly you can't help but think the production team just ran-out of money?That is this book. 5 pages before the end, the protagonist still has no idea how to resolve the issues he's been coping with throughout the entire book. Ditto the secondary charcters. 5 pages out, no one has any idea how to resolve their problems, then suddenly the protagonist slays about a hundred baddi +970 pages. Have you ever watched a movie that was paced and characterized well until the very end? Then it wraps-up so quickly you can't help but think the production team just ran-out of money?That is this book. 5 pages before the end, the protagonist still has no idea how to resolve the issues he's been coping with throughout the entire book. Ditto the secondary charcters. 5 pages out, no one has any idea how to resolve their problems, then suddenly the protagonist slays about a hundred baddies, saves the world, slays a pretty significant antagonist seemingly as an afterthought, and resolves all the relationship problems that have been cropping-up during the course of the book. That being said, until the haphazard resolution, I enjoyed this book much more than its predecessor. In many ways, this book feels familiar - and not just as a sequel. Fans of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time will enjoy a new dynamic to this book. I really enjoyed reading the resolution of this particular thread: not quite knowing who was good and who bad, explanation of how the trained relate to the trainers, etc. It was also neat to read the character development in everyone but Zedd. I was personally pretty disappointed in our wizard's story line. Maybe it is difficult to write for wizards ... but TRY. There, enough said. This one also improves over my last review where one of my main concerns was the graphic nature of some distasteful parts. There is less graphic description in this book (until the last two chapters at least) and I appreciated that. Perhaps the best compliment I can give the book is that I stayed-up five hours to finish the book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Nikki

    I love Fantasy. Yes, I've seen these ideas and read these plot points elsewhere, but I love them so much I don't mind reading something similar, yet new, again. I really feel that the repetition of words and phrases are ridiculously overdone as many other reviewers have stated. I have come to accept this (a little bit) and am able to continue on without throwing anything across the room. This will be the breaking point for most readers who give the Sword of Truth series a try. Mr. Goodkind has a I love Fantasy. Yes, I've seen these ideas and read these plot points elsewhere, but I love them so much I don't mind reading something similar, yet new, again. I really feel that the repetition of words and phrases are ridiculously overdone as many other reviewers have stated. I have come to accept this (a little bit) and am able to continue on without throwing anything across the room. This will be the breaking point for most readers who give the Sword of Truth series a try. Mr. Goodkind has a knack for action and he's pretty good at Kahlan's, Zedd's, and other secondary character's dialogue. However, Richard's character, when he's not fighting, seem to suffer at times. His skull is so thick, I would like to thump it with a big rock. Once he's stuck on an idea, there is no changing it. I take that back. Kahlan has the ability to make him see reason most of the time. There were so many awesome moments/revelations/situations (there really were) that I was easily able to skip over the parts that were unnecessary. This read has some darker elements that I was surprised to find, but I'm okay with that though. (view spoiler)[ The Dark Sisters are now scurrying away from the Palace. Richard is...married? Richard is also soon-to-be married. We'll see how that all plays out. Kahlan is the last Confessor and is supposed to be dead. Zedd was not around much. Richard has decided to accept his powers. I also like the fact that he has a cloak of invisibility. Ring any bells? (hide spoiler)] I'm off to the next one at a more slower pace this time.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    Terry Goodkind is a superb author, and in my opinion, his "Sword of Truth" series is the best I have ever read. So good, in fact, that I have read the entire series three times in a row, back to back, non-stop. This series is *not* for children. The series covers many aspects of the dark side of humanity, in great detail, as the heroes try to overcome the evils in the world. Goodkind is not afraid to show his readers just what evil *really* is, that is, most often, people who perform acts of evi Terry Goodkind is a superb author, and in my opinion, his "Sword of Truth" series is the best I have ever read. So good, in fact, that I have read the entire series three times in a row, back to back, non-stop. This series is *not* for children. The series covers many aspects of the dark side of humanity, in great detail, as the heroes try to overcome the evils in the world. Goodkind is not afraid to show his readers just what evil *really* is, that is, most often, people who perform acts of evil feel justified in their minds as to why they are doing so, if for illogical reasons, and will that those that oppose them are the evil ones. Goodkind shows his readers that the only way to overcome evil in ourselves and in the world is through use of Reason. The series is *not* light reading, but if one is not afraid to confront the reality of evil (even within ourselves), and how to really defeat evil, the one will find this series extremely rewarding.

  25. 5 out of 5

    David Marlow

    Terry Goodkind was able to produce a second Sword of Truth story which manages to keep the reader enthralled from start to finish. The author has a style of his own from other writers. This was a great book, I like the way he gets you to trust a character. But after a while the ones you have learned to trust are the ones poised to strike you. Sure was impressive, which in my opinion makes the events in the story stronger and more realistic. Adding more characters could complicate the story but th Terry Goodkind was able to produce a second Sword of Truth story which manages to keep the reader enthralled from start to finish. The author has a style of his own from other writers. This was a great book, I like the way he gets you to trust a character. But after a while the ones you have learned to trust are the ones poised to strike you. Sure was impressive, which in my opinion makes the events in the story stronger and more realistic. Adding more characters could complicate the story but the author finds the way to get you hooked into the tale. Hey! This book was given to me by a buddy, i strongly recommend this book as i did the previous one.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    5 stars because I could not put it down, but only 4 stars because of some of the content. The story picked up immediately from the last book, and launched straight back into the action, building very slowly to a delicious climax. Parts of the story shocked me, and parts seemed to echo issues covered in the first book, but it was clear that they are very different books. As I said, the climax was rather delicious, and kept the tension alive, which made it real page turner for the last six chapter 5 stars because I could not put it down, but only 4 stars because of some of the content. The story picked up immediately from the last book, and launched straight back into the action, building very slowly to a delicious climax. Parts of the story shocked me, and parts seemed to echo issues covered in the first book, but it was clear that they are very different books. As I said, the climax was rather delicious, and kept the tension alive, which made it real page turner for the last six chapters. The resolution delighted me, and I can not wait until I can read the next book in the series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stela

    I'm done with the series - unfortunately the second book was a big disappointment to me - very repetitive, with an irritating forever whining hero, and soooo long. As usual, the sequel is inferior to the first novel.

  28. 4 out of 5

    John

    Love this series!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Perry Gough

    My 4th Goodkind book and although I do like his books he is someone who does annoy me as his books never seem to reach their potential. The start of this book is very strong with alot of action and sets the story very well. There is also a decent reminder of what happened in the previous book for those who havent read the series in a while. Unfortunatley though about 70% of the way through just like the previous book the final part seems to be mainly filler with more of a weird story just to be w My 4th Goodkind book and although I do like his books he is someone who does annoy me as his books never seem to reach their potential. The start of this book is very strong with alot of action and sets the story very well. There is also a decent reminder of what happened in the previous book for those who havent read the series in a while. Unfortunatley though about 70% of the way through just like the previous book the final part seems to be mainly filler with more of a weird story just to be weird rather then giving the reader what they want. Richard has really grown on me and his character development throughtout this book is fantastic he matures significantly throughout this book and becomes a character you can really get behind where as the last book I found him to be annoying. Same with Kahlan I found that her character has grown alot also and is pretty badass and much more independant. The villian in this book 'The Keeper' however I found to be largley dissappointing when compared to Darken from the previous book. The sisters were a nice touch and I was introduced to both Nicci and Nathan which was pretty cool after reading their spin off book earlier this year. Goodkind also kind of changed his writing style for this book and it seemed to be Game of Thrones-ish with its more mature content and switching between characters. Although GOT is stronger I think the style works well with this series. Overall I did enjoy reading this but was let down by the final quater of the book. I will def read the series as I must find out what happens with Richard and Kahlan who are quickly turning into my favourite Fantasy Series couple. I am just hoping for more consitancy and less filler.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Igor Ljubuncic

    This is my favorite SoT book. I've read it three or four times in my late teens. And then I made a mistake and tried reading it again in 2014. A lot has changed in 15-20 years. But this review is based on how I felt reading this thing back then. I even remember the day I bought the book. I stepped into a store and saw the lovely Tor cover. There was Richard, Sister Verna (is that her name), or is it Kahlan, and that garr thingie. I opened one of the pages at random, and it was the scene when Richa This is my favorite SoT book. I've read it three or four times in my late teens. And then I made a mistake and tried reading it again in 2014. A lot has changed in 15-20 years. But this review is based on how I felt reading this thing back then. I even remember the day I bought the book. I stepped into a store and saw the lovely Tor cover. There was Richard, Sister Verna (is that her name), or is it Kahlan, and that garr thingie. I opened one of the pages at random, and it was the scene when Richard encounters the garr's mother and slays her. In the middle of the page, it read: Blood flies. That one sentence hooked me back then, until I shattered my memory with a 2014 reading. My advice to you book worms out there, let your childhood classics rest, they probably won't turn as good as you remember them. And no limericks for you today, I'm gonna keep them for later books in the series, because they surely deserve them more. Oh, I did confuse books 6 and 8 when it came to writing my reviews, but at that point in the series, it really makes no practical difference. Downhill is downhill. But Stone of Tears is a solid one. Classic, epic, adventurous, and not to be read by cynics over 25 years of age. Thanks for all the fish, Igor

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