kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Scientific Advertising

Availability: Ready to download

Scientific Advertising is an important work on advertising from the early 20th century and is still used today by those learning the basics and more advanced parts of the advertising field. The author of Scientific Advertising, Claude C. Hopkins, is well known as the father of modern advertising techniques, and this book has been widely used by students of advertising and Scientific Advertising is an important work on advertising from the early 20th century and is still used today by those learning the basics and more advanced parts of the advertising field. The author of Scientific Advertising, Claude C. Hopkins, is well known as the father of modern advertising techniques, and this book has been widely used by students of advertising and marketing. This book covers many important aspects of advertising including how advertising laws are established, mail order advertising, headlines, psychology, strategy, budgeting, and more advanced subjects like negative advertising and how to test an advertising campaign.


Compare
kode adsense disini

Scientific Advertising is an important work on advertising from the early 20th century and is still used today by those learning the basics and more advanced parts of the advertising field. The author of Scientific Advertising, Claude C. Hopkins, is well known as the father of modern advertising techniques, and this book has been widely used by students of advertising and Scientific Advertising is an important work on advertising from the early 20th century and is still used today by those learning the basics and more advanced parts of the advertising field. The author of Scientific Advertising, Claude C. Hopkins, is well known as the father of modern advertising techniques, and this book has been widely used by students of advertising and marketing. This book covers many important aspects of advertising including how advertising laws are established, mail order advertising, headlines, psychology, strategy, budgeting, and more advanced subjects like negative advertising and how to test an advertising campaign.

30 review for Scientific Advertising

  1. 5 out of 5

    Vaishali

    The book that started it all. Refreshing in its assertion that vulgar, tawdry ads never create superior sales for companies. If Hopkins died in 1932, this means sleazy commercials have been around far longer than we knew ! Notes ------- “The time has come when advertising has in some hands reached the status of a science. It is based on fixed principles and is reasonably exact… Every course is charted. The compass of accurate knowledge directs the shortest, safest, cheapest course to any destinati The book that started it all. Refreshing in its assertion that vulgar, tawdry ads never create superior sales for companies. If Hopkins died in 1932, this means sleazy commercials have been around far longer than we knew ! Notes ------- “The time has come when advertising has in some hands reached the status of a science. It is based on fixed principles and is reasonably exact… Every course is charted. The compass of accurate knowledge directs the shortest, safest, cheapest course to any destination.” “Success is a rarity, a maximum success an impossibility, unless one is guided by laws as immutable as the law of gravitation.” “The only purpose of advertising is to make sales…Treat it as a salesman. Force it to justify itself.” “Remember the people you address are selfish, as we all are. They care nothing about your interests or profit. They seek service for themselves. Ignoring this fact is… a costly mistake in advertising.” “In mail order advertising… there is no boasting… There is no useless talk. There is no attempt at entertainment. There is nothing to amuse. Mail order advertising usually contains a coupon.” “…Mail order ads are models. They are selling goods profitably in a difficult way. It is far harder to get mail order than to send buyers to the stores. It is hard to sell goods which can't be seen. Ads which do that are excellent examples of what advertising should be.” “Americans are extravagant. They want bargains but not cheapness. They want to feel that they can afford to eat and have and wear the best. Treat them as if they could not and they resent your attitude.” “Those who are entitled to any seeming advantage will go a long way not to lose that advantage.” “It is hard to pay for an article which has once been free... Give samples to interested people only. Give them only to people who exhibit that interest by some effort.” “ 'Best in the world' , 'Lowest price in existence' … superlatives of that sort are usually damaging. They suggest looseness of expression, a tendency to exaggerate, a careless truth.” “Advertisers do not expect a second reading. Their constant returns come from getting new readers. In every ad consider only new customers.” “Take the opinion of nobody, the verdict of nobody, who knows nothing about his (monetary) returns.” “Picturing beautiful women, admired and attractive, is a supreme inducement. But there is a great advantage in including a fascinated man. Women desire beauty largely because of men. Then show them using their beauty, as women do use it, to gain maximum effect.” “Do nothing to merely interest, amuse, or attract… Do only that which wins the people you are after in the cheapest possible way.” “No one orange grower or raisin grower could attempt to increase the consumption of those fruits. The cost might be a thousand times his share of the returns. But thousands of growers combined have done it… There lies one of the great possibilities of advertising development. The general consumption of scores of foods can be profitably increased. But it must be done on wide co-operation.” “An article, for instance, may have many uses, one of which is to prevent disease. Prevention is not a popular subject, however much it should be. People will do much to cure trouble, but people in general will do little to prevent it… A tooth paste may tend to prevent decay. It may also beautify teeth. Tests will probably find that the latter appeal is many times as strong as the former.” "It was the fact that caffeine stimulation comes two hours after drinking. So the immediate bracing effects which people seek from coffee do not come from the caffeine. Removing caffeine does not remove the kick.” “Advertising is much like war… We are usually out to capture others' citadels or garner others' trade. Such things are not accomplished by haphazard efforts. Not by considering people in the mass and making blind stabs for their favors. We must consider individuals… We cannot go after thousands of men until we learn how to win one.” “… Don’t start advertising without distribution. Don't get distribution by methods too expensive (or) slow, old-fashioned methods. The loss of time may cost you enormously in sales. And it may enable energetic rivals to get ahead of you.” “There are winning personalities in ads as well as people. To some we are glad to listen, others bore us. Some are refreshing, some commonplace. Some inspire confidence, some caution. To create the right individuality is a supreme accomplishment. Then an advertiser’s growing reputation on that line brings him ever-increasing prestige.” “To attack a rival is never good advertising. Don't point out others' faults. It is not permitted in the best mediums. It is never good policy. The selfish purpose is apparent. It looks unfair, not sporty.” “We are attracted by sunshine, beauty, happiness, health, success. Then point the way to them, not the way out of the opposite. Picture envied people, not the envious.” “On a patented product it must be remembered that the right to a name expires with that patent. Names like Castoria, Aspirin, Shredded Wheat… have become common property.” .

  2. 4 out of 5

    Apolo

    It puts you in the picture. That said, the book is indeed rather outdated and the stuff that could be regarded, on the other hand, as everlasting principles is fairly commonsensical. So it's far from being an eye- opener, but what I know for a fact is that you don't lose squat giving it a read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Martin Hamilton

    The Grandfather of modern day marketing. He is the inventor of the coupon. He invented the coupon for a reason most people wouldn't guess. Claude Hopkins invented the coupon to 'track' sales. How else would he know which ads were getting responses? How clever! His advice "track everything." Back in the days of newspaper and periodical advertising the cost was expensive. With no free emailing tracking an advertisement was crucial. He was a master at split testing (using more than one offer, track The Grandfather of modern day marketing. He is the inventor of the coupon. He invented the coupon for a reason most people wouldn't guess. Claude Hopkins invented the coupon to 'track' sales. How else would he know which ads were getting responses? How clever! His advice "track everything." Back in the days of newspaper and periodical advertising the cost was expensive. With no free emailing tracking an advertisement was crucial. He was a master at split testing (using more than one offer, tracking results, and finding the winner.) This book was written in the early 1900's and the principles are still as fresh today as they were then. Human nature hasn't changed. Just because we have more methods to get our messages out with doesn't mean the principles have changed. A must read of you are in business, selling, or a stay at home Mom. Everyone needs to understand human psychology, even if it's with their spouse at the dinner table or with their kids out at the mall. Thanks Papa Claude!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Reza Putra

    As a copywriter, I found that this book is vastly helpful to figure out parameters used in writing a copy that sells. In brief, this is a classic book that never dies out. If you are a creative worker, this book must discipline you in terms of business insights. Several "tested" claims in this book, among other things, are as follows: Minimalism doesn't always work. In direct mail, the more you tell the more you sell (chapter 4). Likewise, success stories must be told in complete, either short or As a copywriter, I found that this book is vastly helpful to figure out parameters used in writing a copy that sells. In brief, this is a classic book that never dies out. If you are a creative worker, this book must discipline you in terms of business insights. Several "tested" claims in this book, among other things, are as follows: Minimalism doesn't always work. In direct mail, the more you tell the more you sell (chapter 4). Likewise, success stories must be told in complete, either short or long (chapter 8). Copywriter writes on a serious subject; the subject of money spending (chapter 9). Uniqueness is tricky, therefore wise to avoid. Be normal in everything you do when you are seeking confidence and conviction (chapter 9). A project you are sure of may fall down. All because tastes differ. None of us know enough peoples desires to get an average viewpoint (chapter 15). Negative advertising is negative (chapter 18). Similarly, the "Before and after taking" ads are follies of the past. I assume that Hopkins uses sale as a property in this context. This claim is consistent as at the beginning of the book, he writes that an award-winning ad doesn't necessarily mean that it's good relative to sales. I reckon that a work by DDB, London for Harvey Nichols entitled "What Walk of Shame" (2012) could be an intriguing case study. Regardless thereof, Cannes Lions' winners are sometimes controversial after all. In general, the contents are properly structured while the titles are effective. Many ideas put forward on this book call attention to a historical figure like David Ogilvy who was also known as a former salesman. If you are familiar with his thinking models, you won't have difficulty to follow this book. Several ads are also given as examples. Lamentably, a few of them are illegible (chapter 9). Another weak point, which is substantial, is the absence of data sheet and reference. If it's designed to be scientific, why no works are cited? As I read the pdf version which is distributed for free, are these shortcomings also overlooked in the print version? Has the latest version revised them?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Pitzalis

    Not very scientific. Not a single reference to a real study. Still, some great ideas.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Fahad Naeem

    To be fair, there wasn't any scientific in this Claude Hopkins' book. Scientific Advertising emphasis on headlines and gathering information for creating a sparked-ad. What I wanted to learn from this book is, how to sell a product, which sadly I did not find.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Václav Zoube

    Číst tuhle knížku před lety, ušetřil bych si spoustu zklamání a možná se kariérně vydal jiným směrem. Vřele doporučuji každému.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Massgreen

    It's a short book that offers many practical ways of advertising, what to do and what not to do, all come with examples. Keep in mind this is an old book first published in 1923, so some of the things may not be relevant. But most of the ideas are timeless and relevant. If you could only read one chapter, read Chapter 6 about psychology. Spoiler alert Chapter 1 How Advertising Laws Are Established Advertising if done in a scientific fashion, is not a gamble, but one of the safest, surest ventures w It's a short book that offers many practical ways of advertising, what to do and what not to do, all come with examples. Keep in mind this is an old book first published in 1923, so some of the things may not be relevant. But most of the ideas are timeless and relevant. If you could only read one chapter, read Chapter 6 about psychology. Spoiler alert Chapter 1 How Advertising Laws Are Established Advertising if done in a scientific fashion, is not a gamble, but one of the safest, surest ventures which lead to large returns. Chapter 2 Just Salesmanship Advertising is salesmanship. When you plan or prepare an advertisement, keep before you a typical buyer. Your subject, your headline has gained his or her attention. Then in everything be guided by what you would do if you met the buyer face-to-face. Don't boast, for all people resent it. Don't try to show off. Do just what you think a good salesman should do with a half-sold person before him. The only purpose of advertising is to make sales. It is profitable or unprofitable according to its actual sales. Whether it's ad-writing or sales speech, there should be no fine writing, no unique literary style, no oritorical graces, nothing of rhetoric, no big headlines, no louder voices. Instead, one should be able to express himself sincerely, briefly, clearly and convincingly, just as a salesman must. So with countless questions. Measure them by salesmen's standards, not by amusement standards. Ads are not written to entertain. When they do, those entertainment seekers are little likely to be the people whom you want. That is one of the greatest advertising faults. Ad writers abandon their parts. They forget they are salesmen and try to be performers. Instead of sales, they seek applause. Chapter 3 Offer Service Remember the people you address are selfish, as we all are. They care nothing about your interests or profit. They seek service for themselves. So ads should be based entirely on service, there should be no indications of "Buy my product" kind of messages, they should only picture the customers side of the service until the natural result is to buy. The Give-and-then-take technique can be used in all sorts of product such as cigars, coffee, eletric sewing machine motor, books, typewriters, washing machines, kitchen cabinets, and vacuum sweepers: 1. Send out samples without prepayment -> People anxious to reciprocate the samples -> Get order 2. Free trial for one week -> People can't resist the offer -> Lead to sales because the product was good or they want to reciprocate Chapter 4 Mail Order Advertising: What It Teaches Mail order advertising usually contains a coupon. That is there to cut out as a reminder of something the reader has decided to do because mail order advertisers know that readers forget. So he inserts that reminder to be cut out, and it turns when the reader is ready to act. That said, always leave something so that readers don't forget about you. Chapter 5 Headlines The writing of headlines is one of the greatest journalistic arts. People are hurried. They are not going to read your business talk unless you make it worth their while and let the headline show it. They don't read ads which, at a glance, seem to offer nothing interesting. Perhaps a blind headline or some clever conceit will attract many times as many. But they may consist of mostly impossible subjects for what you have to offer. And the people you are after may never realize that the ad refers to something they may want. Address the people you seek, and them only. Soap ads: "Keep Clean" , "No animal fat" Versus "It floats" , "Make you more fair" Automobile: "Good universal joint" Versus "The Sportiest of Sport Bodies" Chapter 6 Psychology Human nature is perpetual. In most respects it is the same today as in the time of Caesar. So the principles of psychology are fixed and enduring. You will never need to unlearn what you learn about them. 1. Curiosity E.g. "Grains puffed to 8 times the normal size." "Foods shot from guns." "125 million steam explosions caused in every kernel." -he wrote a letter when he sent his catalog, and enclosed a personal card. He said, "You are a new customer, and we want to make you welcome. So when you send your order please enclose this card. The writer wants to see that you get a gift with order - something you can keep." -With an old customer he gave some other reason for the gift. The offer aroused curiosity. It gave preference to his catalog. Without some compelling reason for ordering elsewhere, the woman sent the order to him. The gift paid for itself several times over by bringing larger sales per catalog. 2. Cheapness is not a strong appeal. You should imply bargains but not cheapness. 3. People judge largely by price. -Put a high price tag say $1,000 on a normal hat and people will start noticing it. -Say that your formula is valuable is not impressive, to say that you've paid $100,000 for that formula won a wealth of respect. 4. People like free stuff, e.g. free samples, free trials, and they want defer payment as long as possible -"Try the horse for a week. If my claims are not true, come back for your money." Versus "Try the horse for a week." But he added, "Come and pay me then." -Now countless things - cigars, typewriters, washing machines, books, etc. - are sent out in this way on approval. And we find that people are honest. The losses are very small. 5. People enjoy entitlement and exclusiveness -Send out a book or a gift with a man's name on it. -Employ offer limited to a certain class of people is far more effective than a general offer. For instance, an offer limited to veterans of the war. Or to members of a lodge or sect. Or to executives. Those who are entitled to any seeming advantage will go a long way not to lose that advantage. 6. Tell a nice story about your product -After telling a nice story about your product, people will expect to find the qualities you told in it. -Submit five articles exactly alike and five people may choose one of them. But point out in one some qualities to notice and everyone will find them. The five people then will all choose the same article. Chapter 7 Being Specific Platitudes and generalities roll off the human understanding like water from a duck. They leave no impression whatever. To say, "Best in the world," "Lowest price in existence," etc. are at best simply claiming the expected. Specificities make people realize that tests and comparisons have been made, they are so definite that people will not doubt it. E.g. "This lamp gives more light" Versus "Three and one-third times brighter than normal lights" "Our prices have been reduced" Versus "Our prices have been reduced 25 percent" "Lowest prices in America." Versus "Our net profit is 3 percent." "Abundant lather," "Does not dry on the face," "Acts quickly," Versus "Softens the beard in one minute." "Maintains its creamy fullness for tens minutes on the face." "The final result of testing and comparing 130 formulas." "Quick shaves" Versus "78-second shave" "Used the world over" Versus "Used by the peoples of 52 nations No generality has any weight whatever. It is like saying "How do you do?" When you have no intention of inquiring about ones health. But specific claims when made in print are taken at their value. Chapter 8 Tell Your Full Story Any reader of your ad is interested, else he would not be a reader. You are dealing with someone willing to listen. That reader, if you lose him now, may never again be a reader. Therefore you should tell a story reasonably complete. Don't put up a half-told story because you think people don't read much. It has been shown that people do read much. So tell your complete story no matter it's long or short. Chapter 10 Things Too Costly Changing peoples habits or educate people are very expensive. Instead, it's shrewd to watch the development of a popular trend, the creation of new desires. Then at the right time offer to satisfy those desires. That was done on yeast's, for instance, and on numerous antiseptics. It can every year be done on new things which some popular fashion or widespread influence is brought into vogue. But it is a very different thing to create that fashion, taste or influence for all in your field to share. Display appealing and postive images, not the negative ones: "Cure trouble" Versus "Prevention" "Beautify teeth" Versus "Prevent Decay" "Cure eczema" Versus "Improve Complexion" Chapter 12 Strategy Always discover distinctive qualities that your product or service can provide and then tell to the audience, because in advertising, we must have a seeming advantage. Chapter 13 Use Of Samples Samples, however expensive, usually form the cheapest seling method. 1. They enable one to use the word "Free" in ads. That often multiplies readers. Most people want to learn about any offered gift. 2. Don't give out samples promiscuously, otherwise product wil be cheapened. E.g. samples distributed widely to homes. 3. Give samples only to people who exhibit that interest by some effort. Give them only to people whom you have told your story. First create an atmosphere of respect, a desire, an expectation. When people are in that mood, your sample will usually confirm the qualities you claim. Chapter 15 Test Campaigns Now we let the thousands decide what the millions will do. We make a small venture, and watch cost and result. When we learn what a thousand customers cost, we know almost exactly what a million will cost. If the article is successful, it may make him millions. If he is mistaken about it, the loss is a trifle and he can always redesign the advertisement. Chapter 17 Individuality 1. Whenever possible, always introduce a personality into our ads. By making a man famous we make his product famous. When we claim an improvement, naming the man who made it adds effect. 2. Then we take care not to change an individuality which has proved appealing. Before a man writes a new ad on that line, he gets into the spirit adopted by the advertiser. He plays a part as an actor plays it. -In successful advertising great pains are taken to never change our tone. That which won so many is probably the best way to win others. Then people come to know us. We build on that acquaintance rather than introduce a stranger in guise. People do not know us by name alone, but by looks and mannerisms. Appearing different every time we meet never builds up confidence. Chapter 18 Negative Advertising Don't do negative adversiting, examples are: 1. Attacking a rival. It looks selfish, unfair, and not sporty. 2. Picture what others wish to be, not what they may be now. 2a. Picture well-dressed people, not the shabby. 2b. Picture successful men, not failures, when you advertise a business course. 3. Show the bright side, the happy and attractive side, not the dark and uninviting side of things. 3a. Don't show the wrinkles you propose to remove, but the face as it will appear. 3b. Show pretty teeth, not bad teeth. The "Before and after taking" ads are follies of the past. They never had a place save with the afflicted. Never let their memory lead you to picture the gloomy side of things. Chapter 19 Letter Writing Create a sense of urgency in letter writing (Or in today's context, email replies, facebook reponses). Do something if possible to get immediate action. 1. Offer some inducement for it, e.g. give discounts. 2. Or tell what delay may cost. Note how many successful selling letters place a limit on an offer. It expires on a certain date. That is all done to get prompt decision, to overcome the tendency to delay. Chapter 20 A Name That Helps There is great advantage in a name that tells a story. Some such names are almost complete advertisements in themselves. May Breath is such a name. Cream of Wheat is another. The name itself describes the product, so it makes a valuable display. Other coined names are meaningless. Some examples are Kodak, Karo, Sapolio, Vaseline, Kotex, Lux, Postum, etc. They can be protected, and long-continued advertising may give them a meaning. When this is accomplished they become very valuable. But the great majority of them never attain status. When a product must be called by a common name, the best auxiliary name is a mans name. It is much better than a coined name, for it shows that some man is proud of his creation. For example, Dan's rants, Alice's diary, etc.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Jones

    Probably one of the best books on direct response marketing, and its relationship to sales, ever written. Very practical and still applicable in a world driven by Google AdWords and social media advertising. To sum up in the author's own words: Advertising is salesmanship

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    An all-time classic. Read it or lose money. Read it or get lost in creativity. Read it or get lost in pride. Have you read it yet?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    This is a book I've been meaning to get around to for at least a couple years now. I'm glad it finally ended up in my reading list because it was wonderful. I love the terse, precise prose. Hopkins really hammers home his ideas. I will probably do a full review once I've digested it a bit more, but I want to mention a couple items. A few people have criticized the book for not being "scientific". Its certainly not a scientific article, and would never wind up in a scientific journal. This book is This is a book I've been meaning to get around to for at least a couple years now. I'm glad it finally ended up in my reading list because it was wonderful. I love the terse, precise prose. Hopkins really hammers home his ideas. I will probably do a full review once I've digested it a bit more, but I want to mention a couple items. A few people have criticized the book for not being "scientific". Its certainly not a scientific article, and would never wind up in a scientific journal. This book is mostly anecdotes and advice from a successful advertiser nearing the end of his career. It is a plea for advertisers to have a more scientific mindset when it comes to evaluating the effectiveness of ads and making changes to better improve returns. What its endorsing is science at the workplace and opposed to shooting around blindly and trusting your gut. Some of the more interesting parts of the book were the tips that he gives that flatly contradict the practices that we still see today all of the time. For example, Hopkins hates negative ads - in his experience and that of his colleagues negative ads are ineffective - but we see this kind of stuff quite often. For example, toothpaste commercials will show yellowed teeth turning white. Hopkins stresses that advertisers should just show the white teeth; the viewer already knows about the yellow part. I'm assuming Colgate, and other huge advertisers, have done their 'science' and discovered that these negative ads do in fact work - that times have changed. That's the kicker here. Even if you disagree with Hopkins's advice, you have to challenge him at his own game. The only way to say, "oh, that's bullshit" is to actually go out and do the math - which was Hopkins's goal the whole time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chase Cottle

    3 things that stood out to me from this book: 1. The more you tell, the more you sell 2. if you can prove it on a small scale, the numbers will hold up on a larger scale, once you know it works for 1,000 it will work for 1,000,000 3. Although this was written quite a while ago, the principles still hold true, understanding why your customer wants something and positioning your product or service as a solution is what will get the job done.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Trotter

    Too much fluff, and poorly edited fluff at that. Don't get me wrong, there is actually quite good information contained within. But, rather than a malingering e-book, this (seriously useful) data should have just been presented as a one or two page PDF. I would have still paid for it. In fact, I would have likely paid more to have it condensed. The rambling anecdotes and unnecessary side roads were wholly unnecessary.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jelle Annaars

    I can see how this is a classic, but it's quite outdated. There are some useful universal insights there, but you've got to dig for them. Also, prepare for a dry reading experience. Don't expect any stories or even a sense of humour.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Meryl Evans

    Many in the writing biz recommended this book, but it didn't ring with me. Maybe the writing style just didn't work for me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kalin Stanislavov

    3rd time this year I'm reading it.Recommended by most successful in the industry like John Carlton,Gary Halbert and David Ogilvy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vitor Braga Pereira Santos

    Quem não ler o livro Scientific Advertising de Claude C. Hopkins pelo menos umas 7 vezes não tem nada o que fazer com propaganda. E é com essa frase marcante de David Ogilvy que eu começo o review desse maravilhoso livro. E posso confirmar que David tinha absoluta razão! Ai você me pergunta? Mas Vitor, esse livro que é antigo (um dos primeiros sobre copywriting explicando o assunto de propaganda de forma científica) não está ultrapassado? A resposta é: Nem um pouco. Os meios de comunicação que muda Quem não ler o livro Scientific Advertising de Claude C. Hopkins pelo menos umas 7 vezes não tem nada o que fazer com propaganda. E é com essa frase marcante de David Ogilvy que eu começo o review desse maravilhoso livro. E posso confirmar que David tinha absoluta razão! Ai você me pergunta? Mas Vitor, esse livro que é antigo (um dos primeiros sobre copywriting explicando o assunto de propaganda de forma científica) não está ultrapassado? A resposta é: Nem um pouco. Os meios de comunicação que mudaram. Adapte o que você aprender para a atualidade por que os PRINCÍPIOS científicos de influencia/persuasão impressa, propaganda e marketing nunca sairão de moda! Não temos que reinventar a roda e não temos mais nada o que fazer, além de seguir exatamente o que esse livro sugere, colocando em prática e alcançar resultados que queremos em nossas campanhas. Seja você uma pessoa iniciante ou alguém que já trabalha com marketing. Sejamos francos. Hoje o assunto "marketing" está tão atual depois do boom da internet que quase todo dia você vê pessoas com "sistemas novos" para ganhar resultados com marketing e propaganda online, e que estão cheios de besteira, "bullshit", nada, "nonsense". Eles tem a cara de pau de dizer em seus anúncios que o sistema que eles criaram (baseados não sei no que), é o que tem de mais atual no mercado e todo o resto está "ultrapassado". "How dare you mother f****s?" Mal sabendo que esse mesmo "ZÉ" que fica anunciando seu programa "get rich quick scheeme" "atual" daqui a uns dias vai estar mais que ultrapassado, pois comprovou-se que seu material é totalmente fora do sentido e uma fraude! Criado para enganar bobo e ganhar dinheiro. Você sabe de quem eu estou falando! Visualize na sua mente aquele "guru" com terno ou na praia que diz que vai desvendar os segredos de ganhar fortuna usando marketing digital como estratégia. Falar sobre isso até me enoja. Definitivamente não é o caso do que você vai encontra nesse livro. Que é uma mina de ouro. Scientific Advertising é essencial para todo empreendedor e marketeiro! A qualidade de conteúdo é impressionante. Você não vai se arrepender. Os conteúdos são apresentados de forma que você coloque em pratica, e que você adquira um framework critico para escrever e criar suas campanhas de marketing efetivas. Claude C. Hopkin nessa obra é tão direto ao ponto e tão brilhante que não precisou de mais de 70 páginas (dependendo da edição que você pegar pode ser mais ou menos páginas) para te ensinar de forma simples sobre o que realmente é importante saber para criar copys descentes e que vende para seu produto, serviço e qualquer coisa DE VALOR PERCEPTÍVEL que você tem a oferecer para seu cliente final. E que você possa VENDER, VENDER E VENDER MUITO MAIS! Afinal é sobre isso que propaganda é "Venda impressa" e nada mais. Se você quer iniciar no marketing ou propaganda leia esse livro essencial para as seus negócios ele é a base e um "industry Standard" para copywriting Se você quer vender mais por e-mail ou qualquer meio de comunicação e quer ter uma base sólida e entendimento sobre propaganda. Leia esse livro essencial para as seus negócios!! Se você já é profissional de marketing. Não preciso falar denovo né? RELEIA esse livro essencial para os seus negócios. E se não leu ainda? Não sei o que você está fazendo que não pegou sua cópia! Corra que você tem uma tarefa importante para fazer imediatamente. LEIA!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alessandro

    A must read for anyone interested in advertising. Not five stars because there are a couple of chapters that are outdated and not relevant anymore. The rest, though, is gold. Important lessons for me: - Advertising is multiplied salesmanship. It doesn't need to be entertaining nor weird. Its purpose is to sell. It follows the rules of human interactions. When writing, don't think of people in the mass but trying to think of your ideal customer. - Don't try to sell people what they don't want. - Adve A must read for anyone interested in advertising. Not five stars because there are a couple of chapters that are outdated and not relevant anymore. The rest, though, is gold. Important lessons for me: - Advertising is multiplied salesmanship. It doesn't need to be entertaining nor weird. Its purpose is to sell. It follows the rules of human interactions. When writing, don't think of people in the mass but trying to think of your ideal customer. - Don't try to sell people what they don't want. - Advertising must be scientific. Experiments must be conducted (first on a small scale), results collected, decisions made by understanding what is working or not. - Headlines are pivotal. People are juggling a lot of clutter when it comes to information. Your headline is the only way to convince them to read further. The headline is fundamental because if it doesn't make a prospect read it, then the purpose of the entire campaign is wasted. Headlines shouldn't try to grab anyone in, they should only appeal to people interested in your product/service. - Specificity is king. General statements don't leave the mark and seem put out there just to attract attention. Instead, using numbers, percentages, or specific facts make the ads more interesting and enticing. - A free sample is the best way for the customer to experience your product. Though, instead of just giving it away unsolicitedly (might make you look cheap), make your prospect request it after they read the ad. Bonus point, it makes you use the word "free" in your copy which is a great attention grabber. - People don't care about you and your product. Don't talk about these in your ad, instead focus on the benefits the product/service has for the reader. - Don't use negative imagery in the ads. Instead, picture the change and the final destination/transformation that your product/service will bring. Create a cheerful imagery and environment with your words. - Don't spend money on campaigns trying to educate people. Is like trying to sell shaving cream to people who are proud of their beards. - Test, test, test. - Have a name who is unique and that might already explain the benefits. - Before writing an ad, immerse yourself fully in the topic.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ekaterina Anguelova

    Not all classics age well Having studied social sciences for the past decade, the field of marketing is new to me. I wanted to start at the beginning, just like any course in anthropology would look at the birth of the discipline by referencing authors of the likes of Malinowski and Evans-Pritchard . In this regard, Hopkins's book does not disappoint - it gives a picture of the mindset with which professionals approached marketing as a precise discipline in the first half of the 20th century. Not all classics age well Having studied social sciences for the past decade, the field of marketing is new to me. I wanted to start at the beginning, just like any course in anthropology would look at the birth of the discipline by referencing authors of the likes of Malinowski and Evans-Pritchard . In this regard, Hopkins's book does not disappoint - it gives a picture of the mindset with which professionals approached marketing as a precise discipline in the first half of the 20th century. However, there is little practical guidance and many of the examples provided are half-shrouded in mystery. As other reviewers have noted, for a book so insistent on its scientific approach, the text fails to provide any bibliography or reference to its methods. Furthermore, coupons and mail order, two of the most discussed topics in the book, are completely outdated by now.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dmitry Kuriakov

    Самая маленькая (в плане объёма) и самая первая книга по рекламе - книга Клода Хопкинса «Научная реклама». Наверно, лучше всего именно с неё начинать знакомство с миром рекламы, а не с книги «Огилви о рекламе», т.к. по этой книге учился гуру рекламы Дэвид Огилви. Как сказано в предисловии: «Никого даже близко нельзя подпускать к рекламе, пока он не прочитает эту книгу семь раз. Каждый раз, когда я вижу плохую рекламу, я говорю себе: «Тот, кто это состряпал, никогда не читал Клода Хопкинса». Дэви Самая маленькая (в плане объёма) и самая первая книга по рекламе - книга Клода Хопкинса «Научная реклама». Наверно, лучше всего именно с неё начинать знакомство с миром рекламы, а не с книги «Огилви о рекламе», т.к. по этой книге учился гуру рекламы Дэвид Огилви. Как сказано в предисловии: «Никого даже близко нельзя подпускать к рекламе, пока он не прочитает эту книгу семь раз. Каждый раз, когда я вижу плохую рекламу, я говорю себе: «Тот, кто это состряпал, никогда не читал Клода Хопкинса». Дэвид Огилви. К сожалению, лично для меня, эта книга стала одной из последних книг по рекламе и вследствие этого, я ничего нового для себя не открыл, т.к. уже все, что в ней написано, сказали в своих книгах такие титаны рекламы как Огилви, Шугерман, Кейплз. Поэтому я остановлюсь только на пару моментах. Да, кстати, перевод книги осуществил ни кто иной, как известный в среде маркетологов и копирайтеров А. Репьев. Реклама = Продавец Итак, реклама по Хопкинсу должна…продавать. Как пишет Хопкинс: «О её доходности или не доходности можно судить только по реальным продажам». И далее: «Подходите к самой рекламе как к продавцу. Заставьте её работать. Сравнивайте её результаты с результатами, получаемыми другими продавцами». Кажется, банально. Однако для многих реклама – это WOW. Это то, что должно нести ту же функцию что и кино. Скажем так: реклама для них это фильм в миниатюре. На самом деле, это ошибка. Чтобы реклама продавала, как пишет Хопкинс, она должна не только как бы кричать - «Купите меня», - как это делает продавец. Но действовать также как хороший продавец, а именно, когда «он описывает преимущества своей услуги с точки зрения покупателя до тех пор, пока естественным результатом общения не станет покупка». Практически слово в слово по поводу того, как действует СПИН-метод из книги Нила Рекхэма «СПИН-продажи». Хопкинс предлагает, такой пример иллюстрирующий вышесказанное: «Представьте себе, к вам приходит человек, приносит полфунта кофе и говорит: «Возьмите и попробуйте. Я вернусь через пару дней и спрошу вас, понравился ли вам кофе». Даже возвратившись, он не просит купить. Он объясняет, что хочет предложить необходимый каждой женщине предмет кухонной утвари». Фишка в том, что продавец ничего не предлагает купить. Он как бы старается не касаться этой темы, чтобы не создать образ торговца, который ходит и втюхивает товар. Это предложение, которое вам либо нравиться, либо нет. Очень часто можно видеть, как продавцы всеми силами только и делают, что кричат: «Ну, купите у меня это, пожалуйста». Только эту фразу и больше ничего. Конкретика свойств товара/услуги Как было сказано выше, необходимо описывать свойства товара. К этому вопросу Хопкинс добавляет такую тему, как «быть конкретным». К примеру, как пишет автор, «Кремы для бритья годами рекламировали, говоря: «много пены», «не сохнет на лице» и «действует быстро». Всё это стало неинтересно. Затем на рынке появился новый производитель. Ситуация на рынке была очень сложной, поскольку каждого пользователя приходилось отнимать у конкурента. Новый производитель привёл конкретные факты: «размягчает щетину за одну минуту», «в течение 10 минут пена на лице не спадает», «окончательный результат испытаний и сравнений 130 составов». Возможно, в рекламе ещё не было столь быстрого успеха на таком непростом рынке». Эту же идею можно встретить у Кейплза, когда он сравнивает два текста рекламы. Так в одном использовались только общие слова: «нежность», «чистота», свежесть». А в другом - более удачном варианте - более конкретные фразы: «оливкового и пальмового масла», «никаких других жиров и примесей», «Никакого искусственного подкрашивания», «Никакого тяжёлого запаха». И если уж вы решили описывать все факты и свойства товара или услуги, то, как пишет следующей главе Хопкинс, «сообщите ему всё, что только можете ему сообщить. Представьте все свои продающее моменты». Добавлю к этому, что если имеются уникальные свойства, то их можно выставить в авангарде, особо акцентируя на них. Картинка в рекламе Что касается иллюстраций, то Хопкинс, как и Огилви, следуют тому мнению, что «иллюстрации не следует использовать просто потому, что они интересны. Или для того, чтобы привлекать внимание. Или для украшения рекламы». Это объясняется тем, что рекламу пишут не для веселья, а для того, чтобы заставить покупателя раскошелиться. Поэтому, как дальше пишет Хопкинс, «используйте графику, которая привлечёт только тех, кто принесёт доход. Используйте графику только тогда, когда она продаёт лучше, чем аналогичный объём текста». И далее: «эксцентричная или слишком оригинальная иллюстрация отвлекает внимание от предмета вашей рекламы». Этим грешат очень многие. Как писал тот же Огилви: «Если говорят о рекламе, это плохая реклама. Если говорят о товаре, это хорошая реклама». Один из самых спорных вопросов в рекламе: негативная реклама В заключении приведу мнение Хопкинса о негативной рекламе, т.е. рекламе в которой делается акцент на том, каком ущерб понесёт покупатель, при столкновении с проблемой, которую призван решать товар (к примеру, реклама описывающая проблему под названием «незапланированная беременность» для рекламы противозачаточных средств). Хопкинс отзывается об этом так: «Сравните результаты двух реклам, одной негативной и другой позитивной. Одна из них представляет тёмную сторону, другая – светлую. Одна предупреждает, другая приглашает. Вы будете удивлены. Вы обнаружите, что положительная реклама привлекает вчетверо больше людей, если её сделал опытный рекламист». Однако, социальный психолог в соавторстве с другими авторами книги «Психология убеждения» пишет о том, что данные опытов показали, что когда группу людей «запугивали» и знакомили с информацией о том, как предохранить себя, эта группа, в отличие от тех, кого просто информировали, более активно участвовала в профилактике заболеваний.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Khôi Nguyễn

    "Ads are not written to entertain. When they do, those entertainment seekers are little likely to be the people whom you want. That is one of the greatest advertising faults. Ad writers abandon their parts. They forget they are salesmen and try to be performers. Instead of sales, they seek applause." This is definitely my favorite excerpt of this book. The book provides plenty of universal insights back in the old days and still hold true nowadays, but some are outdated in the digital age. The wri "Ads are not written to entertain. When they do, those entertainment seekers are little likely to be the people whom you want. That is one of the greatest advertising faults. Ad writers abandon their parts. They forget they are salesmen and try to be performers. Instead of sales, they seek applause." This is definitely my favorite excerpt of this book. The book provides plenty of universal insights back in the old days and still hold true nowadays, but some are outdated in the digital age. The writing style and choice of words do make it hard for non-native English speakers like me to digest. I think I would revisit this book for a few more times as the first reading was totally fragmented because the scientific aspect of the book somewhat makes it really dry to read. However, I think this is still a must-read for any advertiser to truly immerse in the essence of the industry.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Li

    "Nobody, at any level, should be allowed to have anything to do with advertising until he has read this book seven times." That was the first sentence in the introduction of this book (written by Ogilvy himself) and it just goes to show you the power of copywriting. The writing in this book is short and succinct. It really feels like someone very passionate about the topic is talking to you in real life. Indeed, this makes sense since the first non-introduction chapter of the book teaches that adv "Nobody, at any level, should be allowed to have anything to do with advertising until he has read this book seven times." That was the first sentence in the introduction of this book (written by Ogilvy himself) and it just goes to show you the power of copywriting. The writing in this book is short and succinct. It really feels like someone very passionate about the topic is talking to you in real life. Indeed, this makes sense since the first non-introduction chapter of the book teaches that advertising is just salesmanship but in print. Whatever you do in real life when you are trying to sell something, you should do the same in print. Be a salesman. This is definitely required reading for anyone involved with advertising or marketing of any kind.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sgt. Pellican

    In questo breve prontuario vengono raccolte quelle che lo stesso Hopkins definisce le regole base per un advertising efficace che si basa su un metodo scientifico. Sicuramente è un testo che risente il peso degli anni, molte cose sono cambiate dal 1930, soprattutto in un ambito in grande crescita come il marketing che cerca di cavalcare ogni nuova tecnologia comunicativa. Non per questo risulta essere un libro inutile, anzi, oltre all'importanza storica, si possono carpire delle fondamentali noz In questo breve prontuario vengono raccolte quelle che lo stesso Hopkins definisce le regole base per un advertising efficace che si basa su un metodo scientifico. Sicuramente è un testo che risente il peso degli anni, molte cose sono cambiate dal 1930, soprattutto in un ambito in grande crescita come il marketing che cerca di cavalcare ogni nuova tecnologia comunicativa. Non per questo risulta essere un libro inutile, anzi, oltre all'importanza storica, si possono carpire delle fondamentali nozioni di marketing che analizzando la pubblicità odierna sono ancora presenti anche se hanno cambiato forma o mezzo comunicativo.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adebayo Ijidakinro

    This book truly teaches you how to advertise I hate most books that say they’re going to teach an important skills, because all to often their filled with palaver and useless opinion and gimmicks. Not so with this book. This book will truly understand how to advertise, and why certain methods work based on fact. It’s obviously the result of years of research, therefore, what is in this book can be relied upon as truth as oppose to simply one popular mans desirable but utterly worthless opinion. R This book truly teaches you how to advertise I hate most books that say they’re going to teach an important skills, because all to often their filled with palaver and useless opinion and gimmicks. Not so with this book. This book will truly understand how to advertise, and why certain methods work based on fact. It’s obviously the result of years of research, therefore, what is in this book can be relied upon as truth as oppose to simply one popular mans desirable but utterly worthless opinion. Read this book if you want to advertise properly. You will have no regrets.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jasonk

    I'd like to echo what others have said and let people know that this book can be found for free at the Library of Congress website. This is the second book I've read as part of my self-teaching curriculum to be a copywriter. It's a short read (less than 100 pages). But each page wastes no space. There were some pages where I felt as if I was absorbing years and years of experience/information in just a few sentences. There are many useful nuggets in this short read. I really recommend reading thi I'd like to echo what others have said and let people know that this book can be found for free at the Library of Congress website. This is the second book I've read as part of my self-teaching curriculum to be a copywriter. It's a short read (less than 100 pages). But each page wastes no space. There were some pages where I felt as if I was absorbing years and years of experience/information in just a few sentences. There are many useful nuggets in this short read. I really recommend reading this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Leticia

    This is a great book, but I wish I had read it prior to Hopkins’s companion work, My Life in Advertising. Many of the examples are the same in both works, and while the detail in this volume is good, it would have been much more efficient for the reader to edit them into a single volume. In this way, the method and the illustration would have been more valuable all round. But it is an excellent work, and highly recommended for anyone in publicity, advertising, marketing, copywriting, or other form This is a great book, but I wish I had read it prior to Hopkins’s companion work, My Life in Advertising. Many of the examples are the same in both works, and while the detail in this volume is good, it would have been much more efficient for the reader to edit them into a single volume. In this way, the method and the illustration would have been more valuable all round. But it is an excellent work, and highly recommended for anyone in publicity, advertising, marketing, copywriting, or other forms of persuasion.

  27. 4 out of 5

    colin

    Old but still relevant For a book written so long ago, it truly is amazing how much of this book is still useful. I am going to re-read several of the chapters, just to take all the information in. There are a few chapters I didn't find particularly fitting for my line of advertising, but all in all I learned a ton.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alex Drysdale

    Very good outline of the basics in advertising. This would be both a good starting point for people starting to dip into the principles of advertising, as well as a good reminder for seasoned vets that may be bogged down deep into the technical world of social media advertising. Definitely a must for a new startup founder, or solopreneur.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Antero

    Suhteellisen lyhyt opus, vain 87 sivua. Kirja sisältää ihan hyviä vinkkejä vaikka onkin alunperin kirjoitettu jo vuonna 1923. Kirjan perusajatus siitä, että markkinoinnin pitäisi perustua mitattaviuteen on toki nykyään digimarkkinoinnissa ja (toivottavasti) muussakin markkinoinnissa käytössä. Tähtiä ei tullut montaa, mutta voisin hyvin lukea kirjan uudelleenkin.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karla Cristobal

    Succinct, logical, and systematic, Hopkins reveals that advertising, instead of relying on instinct and blind groping, should rely on a scientific, data-backed approach. From knowing the cost of a consumer, to naming your brand, to the power of sampling, he provides a depth of insight to what would otherwise be something you thought you already knew. Makes sense, doesn't it?

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.