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The Art of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

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Step inside the Lucasfilm art department and experience the creative genesis of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. A thrilling endeavour for the Star Wars franchise, Rogue One is the first instalment in the Star Wars Story series, a collection of stand-alone tales set in the same beloved universe fans have called home for decades. The plot follows an unlikely band of rebel figh Step inside the Lucasfilm art department and experience the creative genesis of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. A thrilling endeavour for the Star Wars franchise, Rogue One is the first instalment in the Star Wars Story series, a collection of stand-alone tales set in the same beloved universe fans have called home for decades. The plot follows an unlikely band of rebel fighters, led by the intrepid Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who must unite to resist the evil machinations of the evil Galactic Empire. Their mission is a desperate one: prove the existence of the Empire’s new super weapon and steal the plans for this Death Star before it can be used to obliterate all who stand in the Empire’s way. Directed by Gareth Edwards – from a script by Gary White and Chris Weitz – the film also stars Diego Luna, Forest Whitaker, Mads Mikkelsen, Alan Tudyk, Riz Ahmed, Ben Mendelsohn, Jiang Wen, and Donnie Yen. The Art of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story is an invaluable visual chronicle of the Lucasfilm art department’s development of the fantastical sets, otherworldly machinery, and unforgettable characters found in this first Star Wars Story. This book will take you from the earliest gathering of artists and production designers through production, with unprecedented access to the filmmakers’ creative process. Bursting with exclusive interviews and imagery, fans can revel in hundreds of stunning works of art, including production paintings, concept art and sketches, storyboards, and matte paintings. This rich visual journey is sure to delight Star Wars fans and cineastes for decades to come. The Art of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story will stand as a definitive guide to the art behind the newest tale in the Star Wars franchise.


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Step inside the Lucasfilm art department and experience the creative genesis of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. A thrilling endeavour for the Star Wars franchise, Rogue One is the first instalment in the Star Wars Story series, a collection of stand-alone tales set in the same beloved universe fans have called home for decades. The plot follows an unlikely band of rebel figh Step inside the Lucasfilm art department and experience the creative genesis of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. A thrilling endeavour for the Star Wars franchise, Rogue One is the first instalment in the Star Wars Story series, a collection of stand-alone tales set in the same beloved universe fans have called home for decades. The plot follows an unlikely band of rebel fighters, led by the intrepid Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who must unite to resist the evil machinations of the evil Galactic Empire. Their mission is a desperate one: prove the existence of the Empire’s new super weapon and steal the plans for this Death Star before it can be used to obliterate all who stand in the Empire’s way. Directed by Gareth Edwards – from a script by Gary White and Chris Weitz – the film also stars Diego Luna, Forest Whitaker, Mads Mikkelsen, Alan Tudyk, Riz Ahmed, Ben Mendelsohn, Jiang Wen, and Donnie Yen. The Art of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story is an invaluable visual chronicle of the Lucasfilm art department’s development of the fantastical sets, otherworldly machinery, and unforgettable characters found in this first Star Wars Story. This book will take you from the earliest gathering of artists and production designers through production, with unprecedented access to the filmmakers’ creative process. Bursting with exclusive interviews and imagery, fans can revel in hundreds of stunning works of art, including production paintings, concept art and sketches, storyboards, and matte paintings. This rich visual journey is sure to delight Star Wars fans and cineastes for decades to come. The Art of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story will stand as a definitive guide to the art behind the newest tale in the Star Wars franchise.

30 review for The Art of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Well another Star Wars film and another concept art book and yes I make not apology for it - ever since my brother came home with the coveted first edition artwork books from the first 3 films in the early 90s have I been hook on these books and film concept books in general The fact that Star Wars are the masters at merchandising really is unfair for these books as they have always been sumptuous books to read -however they have increased the quality now that it seems standard fair for a new fil Well another Star Wars film and another concept art book and yes I make not apology for it - ever since my brother came home with the coveted first edition artwork books from the first 3 films in the early 90s have I been hook on these books and film concept books in general The fact that Star Wars are the masters at merchandising really is unfair for these books as they have always been sumptuous books to read -however they have increased the quality now that it seems standard fair for a new film to issue its "art of" book. And rise to the challenge they have - the book is packed with artwork - both concept and production in such amazing detail the book isa lavish record of how the film was conceived and produced. As always it contains a thousand possibilities you wish they had chosen and its at this point it hits you that even though Star Wars has been going for decades now there appears to be night end in sight of the stories they can tell. This book is a dream for any Star Wars fan - which I make not apology for and I cannot wait to see what else they add to the collection. If you enjoyed the film you have to read this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    I read The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens last year and I don't know why I didn't review it, because goddamn I loved that book. I actually pulled it off the shelf for comparison when Art of Rogue One came in the mail, and fell in love with it all over again. I only have a handful of concept art books (or art books in general, since I don't generally re"read" art books), but Art of Force Awakens is goddamn gorgeous. If you are someone who runs Star Wars RPG campaigns (me), and/or reads and/o I read The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens last year and I don't know why I didn't review it, because goddamn I loved that book. I actually pulled it off the shelf for comparison when Art of Rogue One came in the mail, and fell in love with it all over again. I only have a handful of concept art books (or art books in general, since I don't generally re"read" art books), but Art of Force Awakens is goddamn gorgeous. If you are someone who runs Star Wars RPG campaigns (me), and/or reads and/or writes a lot of scifi (me again), and or just really likes looking at 200 pages of weird aliens and shit (hey there!) Art of Force Awakens is definitely your book. It never gets old, even if the movie it inspired might have already worn a little thin. Art of Rogue One is, by comparison, pretty laser-focused. If the art team on Force Awakens was tasked with reinventing the entire SW universe in order to pick and choose the spiciest bits, on Rogue One they simply went in and created the most in-depth and lavish storyboard I've ever seen for a very specific story. More than anything, Art of Rogue One suggests a reinvention for how to plan a blockbuster movie. Indie film director Mike Figgis has talked in interviews about how he writes his scripts on music scoring paper in order to immediately establish their pacing. Somewhat similarly, Art of Rogue One describes how its director Gareth Edwards built each scene around key frames designed to evoke the feeling of static portraits and communicate each scene's mood and tone. This is probably why the finished film feels like the most cinematic (a general term I'm using to emphasize the aesthetic of each scene over the content of each scene) Star Wars entry since The Empire Strikes Back. Obviously calling anything cinematic implies that I am arguing for some sort of intellectual/artistic superiority of Rogue One over "busier" films like Force Awakens, and perhaps I am. But this isn't a hard and fast judgment -- as a Star Wars fan, I'll pop in Return of the Jedi to groove on two hours of alien muppets over Empire pretty much any day of the week. Similarly, I think Art of Force Awakens has a lot more to offer as a volume of concept art. If the simplest function of concept art is to inspire, then, conversely, I don't think Art of Rogue One does as much in the way of flash-bang-wow! crazy ideas and visuals. However, I do think there's a value in its nuanced discussion of how to use visuals to enhance not only the way a film handles storytelling (a term which seems to mostly get used and prioritized by people who don't actually tell stories), but also how to use visuals in order to enhance a film's emotional and thematic breadth. I think that Art of Rogue One would almost have worked better as a longform article about combining storyboarding and concept art when making films, instead of labeling itself as a coffee table art book. But it's okay for what it is, and makes a thoughtful companion volume to Art of Force Awakens.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    4.5 Stars A great book depicting the art of Star Wars: Rogue One. It looks like they have some artwork that depicts scenes and characters that did not end up in the finished movie. But still pretty cool that they showed what scenes and characters there could have been. I also loved seeing the concept art for the characters and the scenes that did make it into the film. Great for any Star Wars fan!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Neil Coulter

    In the lead-up to Rogue One, I was cautiously optimistic. I loved the trailers (but who can ever tell anything from trailers?), I loved James Luceno's prologue novel, Catalyst, I loved the whole idea of a Star Wars movie that feels and looks different from the others. But I'd been a little disappointed by The Force Awakens, and I don't have a lot of faith in the mega-franchise machine of Disney. But I loved it! I just absolutely loved seeing it on opening weekend, reveling in a Star Wars movie th In the lead-up to Rogue One, I was cautiously optimistic. I loved the trailers (but who can ever tell anything from trailers?), I loved James Luceno's prologue novel, Catalyst, I loved the whole idea of a Star Wars movie that feels and looks different from the others. But I'd been a little disappointed by The Force Awakens, and I don't have a lot of faith in the mega-franchise machine of Disney. But I loved it! I just absolutely loved seeing it on opening weekend, reveling in a Star Wars movie that felt like it had been specially crafted for fans. For Christmas, my beautiful wife surprised me with a copy of The Art of Rogue One, knowing my love for Rogue One, Star Wars, and "Art of" books. What a great choice (her choice of gift and my choice of wife)! I now see that one of the reasons I loved the film is that I'm now the same age as many of the people working behind the scenes, and most of them were born and raised on the original trilogy just as I was. There's a lot of shared nostalgia and collective memory, and it really paid off for the movie. The "Art of" book is a beautiful collection of concept artwork from some of the many artists who had a hand in designing the film. It's almost like a whole new book of previously undiscovered Ralph McQuarrie paintings. As with any "Art of" book, my only complaint is that it's too short--I long to see more, and especially to see connected series of concepts leading from initial ideas to final design. However, it's a great book, and it'll help me see the locations better the next time I watch the movie.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Following the same format as The Art Of The Force Awakens, this takes the story of Rogue One from the initial concept right up to the start of shooting, featuring commentary from Doug Chiang and Peter Lamont (co-production designers), Matt Allsop (lead concept artist), Gareth Edwards (director) and more. From the original John Knoll pitch (which the film appears to follow in general terms, rather than specific details), the book charts the development of characters, aliens and landscapes, whilst Following the same format as The Art Of The Force Awakens, this takes the story of Rogue One from the initial concept right up to the start of shooting, featuring commentary from Doug Chiang and Peter Lamont (co-production designers), Matt Allsop (lead concept artist), Gareth Edwards (director) and more. From the original John Knoll pitch (which the film appears to follow in general terms, rather than specific details), the book charts the development of characters, aliens and landscapes, whilst making it clear that everyone worked hard to stay within the Star Wars set universe but to do things themselves at the same time. Ralph McQuarrie, once again, casts a long shadow and it was his initial designs (which was exactly the thought I had when I saw the film) that inspired Vader’s castle on Mustafar and his design prowess can be seen in the films weaponry too. I did like the quote that the whole production embraced, from Edwards, where in terms of design and look the team approached ‘A New Hope’ “how you remember it, not how it was” and that’s clear to see from the imagery. This is a cracking book (I fell in love with it from about page 5 and didn’t want it to end) and it’s has several benefits over the similar Art Of TFA I read this time last year - for a start, Kushins is a better writer than Phil Szostak and doesn’t gush over everyone involved. In the same vein, Doug Chiang and Peter Lamont are much more down-to-earth (none of the pretentious ‘reaching out’ of Rick Carter to annoy me with this one) and their approach to the material is intriguing and exciting. An excellent companion to an excellent film, I would highly recommend this.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rusty

    Art books. Again with the art. This is a large book containing many beautiful paintings of concept art for Rogue One. Aside for a few times where the focal point of an image appeared right between two pages, in the binding, and therefore made the entire image look sort of stupid, I really loved this book. I tend to only get these “Art of…” books for the occasional Marvel or Star Wars movie. I like those movies, I like the mythology and feel for those worlds, so it stands to reason that I’d like t Art books. Again with the art. This is a large book containing many beautiful paintings of concept art for Rogue One. Aside for a few times where the focal point of an image appeared right between two pages, in the binding, and therefore made the entire image look sort of stupid, I really loved this book. I tend to only get these “Art of…” books for the occasional Marvel or Star Wars movie. I like those movies, I like the mythology and feel for those worlds, so it stands to reason that I’d like the art books they produce too. So, yay, I guess. I like the book. I guess if I hated the movie I might not like the book as much. I don’t know. And while I’m mentioning the movie, I think I have to say that while I liked Rogue One, a lot, more than the previous entry, ‘The Force Awakens,’ which I also liked, it was made all the more sour for me because of the missed opportunities the movie had to be truly, one of my favorite movies of all time. And I’m tempted to go over the story points one after another and point out each one I had issue with, but I’m assuming the internet has addressed my concerns, and probably made better suggestions than I could have come up with. So, whether it’s the psychic blob creature that reads minds and causes brain damage, except that I’m not sure if does either of those things, or if it’s the pig faced guy and his evil partner with their cameo in Rogue One, possibly becoming the Star Wars equivalents to Forest Gump, who now seem to show up on the periphery of historic moments in the galaxy, more or less by accident. I mean, the pig nosed guy didn’t really bother me, the psychic blog thing did. But it’s all forgivable. What I was most curious about was the movie’s third act, which appears to have been so massively rewritten and reshot that you can almost piece together an entirely different movie using just the trailers. I personally, and I guess I’m spoiling the movie here, so beware, if you haven’t seen it, I might annoy you with the spoiler that’s coming. Like I was saying, I personally feel like the third act was better as I saw in the trailers than it was in the actual theater. The whack-a-mole type of dance to retrieve the data tapes reminded me of that moment in GalaxyQuest when Sigourney Weaver’s character was beside herself in frustration at how needlessly complicated the bowels of the spaceship they were in were. I was hoping for less time spent fiddling with satellite reception and more time trying to escape with the plans. I understand the decision was made for everyone to die, but the ending felt trite to me. No one really has a poignant ending. They were all coming one on top of the other so fast that there was no time to deal with the gravity of the scene before the next person was dead. If it were me, I think I would have found a way for Jyn to have escaped the planet, and maybe have been the last man standing on the ship where Vader cut down half the Rebellion trying to get the plans back. Whatever, I can’t be bothered to dramatize the whole thing, you’ll just have to trust me that I’ve worked out a reasonable scenario where Jyn Erso escapes Scariff with the plans and ends up getting cut down by Vader in a moment of high drama. It’s epic, and makes more narrative sense. And it also gets to keep the scenes I saw in the trailer of her walking down the gantry with the tie fighter rising up, and her running from the AT-ACTs on the beachfront. Seriously, given what I saw, which, again, I liked, I think my version would have been amazing. And it’s rare that I feel that there are such obviously missed opportunities like there were in this movie. But, you know, if I feel that strongly about it, I may whip up a fan-fic version of my ending at some point. I’ve been working on a super epic Star Trek fan fic which I’m pretty sure will amaze the world with it’s awesome once I get around to dumping it online in another few years. So, in the end, to conclude, I could have made Rogue One the best movie of the decade, I for sure should be a staff writer on the new Star Trek tv show, and I also liked this art book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    It took me weeks and weeks to finish this book because I read it piecemeal and digested each and every beautiful piece of art. Thoroughly recommended for Star Wars fans as well as movie and art fans.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    I love to see art in motion, and the art that creates the Star Wars universe. This book has wonderful drawings, and wonderful creative insight into how Rogue One was made.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Moe

    I've always loved Star Wars, and this book went in depth on the new movie they just made. The pictures and little excerpts were excellent. I learned that they had to draw a million ships in order to get the perfect ship. I knew that it took lots of money time and effort to make something like a Star Wars movie, but I never would've guessed how much time it took just to develop the characters. I suggest this book to any Star Wars fan who wants to see the making of characters and locations set in t I've always loved Star Wars, and this book went in depth on the new movie they just made. The pictures and little excerpts were excellent. I learned that they had to draw a million ships in order to get the perfect ship. I knew that it took lots of money time and effort to make something like a Star Wars movie, but I never would've guessed how much time it took just to develop the characters. I suggest this book to any Star Wars fan who wants to see the making of characters and locations set in the movie.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Milo Arcende

    Great book. It has always been incredible to me to see how much work is put into each single frame of a movie.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cat

    The world of Star Wars has such a plethora of beautiful and different worlds. From lush greens to dusty desert browns to serene (and not so quiet) wintry snows. This book has it all! and more.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    Abrams continues their line of “Art of” books with The Art of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. The book is very similar to The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens in both size and layout design. With a large swath of imagery with varying styles, it presents a look at the concept art for the film, the characters, the locations and the ships. Along with the imagery is behind the scenes snippets with quotes from the creators revealing the creation process and some of the stories behind the images. Whi Abrams continues their line of “Art of” books with The Art of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. The book is very similar to The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens in both size and layout design. With a large swath of imagery with varying styles, it presents a look at the concept art for the film, the characters, the locations and the ships. Along with the imagery is behind the scenes snippets with quotes from the creators revealing the creation process and some of the stories behind the images. While this book won’t reveal all of Rogue One‘s secrets, it does shed some light on how the story came about and how it changed from John Knoll’s original pitch to what we finally saw on the screen. For book fans who already have The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens on their shelves, you’ll be happy to know that The Art of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story will sit nicely side-by-side as it’s the same size and format. Looking at the stats, both books are hardcovers with 256 pages, however there is a difference in regards to content. After reading through The Art of Rogue One, I couldn’t help but feel The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens was better somehow. Part of that could be the difference in illustrations. The Art of Rogue One has 300 illustrations whereas The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens had twice as many with 600 illustrations. There’s also a difference in the written content included in this book. While there is a sneak peak at the creation process and some of the behind the scenes work, it’s not as much as what we got in The Force Awakens book. There is a difference in authors between the two as this one is written by Josh Kushins and the previous one was done by Phil Szostak. Comparing the two, The Force Awakens book is the better of the pair. That said, The Art of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story is still a good book with some neat content. There’s some gorgeous concept art as well as some eye opening images at what could have been. There are forewords by Doug Chiang, Neil Lamont, Gareth Edwards, and throughout the book there are quotes from the creators and concept artists who worked on the film such as Doug Chiang, Gareth Edwards, Neil Scanlan and Kathleen Kennedy. It provides some insight into the aesthetic direction of the film as well as how the story started and changed. There’s a very intriguing summary of John Knoll’s initial story idea which was very different from the final film. However the content is in no way a thorough look at the behind the scenes development of the film. Instead, it’s a tantalizing glimpse. The book is a quick read as I was able to finish it in just two evenings. While it’s not the best art of book, it’s still fairly nice with some good content. I give it a four out of five.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It’s a wonderful book for fans of Star Wars: Rogue One, and fans of the Star Wars universe in general. I greatly enjoyed reading about how the concept art and the writing of the story narrative and character arcs were so intertwined, where the art really drove the narrative. It is an immersive read and probably will take a few more read through to fully understand and find all the little secrets hidden within the words, but in that, it is just like watching the movies itself. My only gripe is th It’s a wonderful book for fans of Star Wars: Rogue One, and fans of the Star Wars universe in general. I greatly enjoyed reading about how the concept art and the writing of the story narrative and character arcs were so intertwined, where the art really drove the narrative. It is an immersive read and probably will take a few more read through to fully understand and find all the little secrets hidden within the words, but in that, it is just like watching the movies itself. My only gripe is the lack of information on Cassian. For a movie that is so character driven, there is not enough of the character development art for me to be extremely satisfied. I am still happy nonetheless to learn about the creative process.

  14. 5 out of 5

    La Fuente

    Excellent book! Back in the day (meaning the late 70s, early 80s) The Art of Star Wars launched a whole new genre of book that explored the sketches, designs, and concepts that go into filmmaking. And I'm happy to say The Art of Rogue One continues that tradition with a compelling collection that reveals all kinds of great artwork, much of which would look awesome framed and up on the wall. There are awesome stories and explanations of why certain designs were chosen, and why others were abandone Excellent book! Back in the day (meaning the late 70s, early 80s) The Art of Star Wars launched a whole new genre of book that explored the sketches, designs, and concepts that go into filmmaking. And I'm happy to say The Art of Rogue One continues that tradition with a compelling collection that reveals all kinds of great artwork, much of which would look awesome framed and up on the wall. There are awesome stories and explanations of why certain designs were chosen, and why others were abandoned. Beautifully presented artwork. It gave me a real appreciation for all the talented n' skilled folks who are contributing to the world of Star Wars these days. Every time I turned the page, I was like "aw hell yeah, wish I could draw like that!"

  15. 5 out of 5

    nicole

    We finally watched Rogue One and I loved it, like, maybe a little too much. (Jyn & Cassian shipping, all up in Tumblrs and fan fiction since.) I remembered seeing this in the library over the summer and wanted to pick it up hoping to feed that fire. It was good but not great, less like watching a making of than I thought it would be. Genie was amazed by it though so we largely read it together, while Mae got ready for bed each night.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tim Lapetino

    Excellent foray into the art and design of Rogue One. More than just beauty shots, the chosen material really shows the stylistic and design evolution needed for the film to both speak to sophisticated, modern audiences while also fitting into the lexicon and timelines of the Star Wars films. Kushins does a great job managing all these needs while still making it a compelling read. He writes with one hand on the artist's tablet, and the other firmly grasping the director's helm.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Thom

    Lavish art produced before the film, reminds me strongly of the late Ralph McQuarrie, whose art led directly to the first film. Art is interspersed with explanations and thoughts, so this isn't just a picture book - though it is mostly a picture book. The evolution of K-2SO was good, and the original version of the final battle at Scarif was interesting to read about. I have a strong desire to rewatch the movie, now that I've read this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    I am currently completely obsessed with Rogue One. So the chance to get my fingers on this book was awesome. When I read The Art of Rise of the Guardians, I wanted to fill sketchbooks full of art. Reading this, I want to obsess over every piece of Star Wars concept art ever made. It is so gorgeous. The artists capture so much of the feelings of the scenes. It's so good.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Similar to the Art of The Force Awakens book, there's an emphasis on the art department rather than on the costumes or creatures, though more of the latter are present here than in TFA. The art is organized by location. I loved what Doug Chiang wrote in the forward (introduction?) about the color palette and how it echoes Jyn's journey from darkness to light, uncertainty to clarity. very neat.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Loved seeing the production artwork associated with a movie that really has so many stunning visuals. Enjoyed seeing in particular how some of the characters morphed and changed as the story was nailed down.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Casey Miller

    This was one of the best art books I've read. I'm not even normally a huge Star Wars fan, but the concept art in this book was just incredible. Strongly recommended for fans of Star Wars or any fans of concept art, fantasy, and science fiction.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Rodriguez

    A nice look into the pre-production of one of my favorite movies. Not a lot of art on the supporting characters (Bodhi, Cassian, etc) but still really good.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Oscar

    Full of gorgeous art and fun little insights on the conept and production process.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tom Gilson

    My first art book and really love the concept art for the ships. And a good 'LEGO idea book'

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    I really loved this. The art is fantastic. I enjoyed getting a closer look at the the planets, scenery, and beings. I just wish there were more concept sketches of the main characters.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Lynch

    A splendid collection of production art, most of which is as exciting and impressive as the film.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nessa [October Tune]

    This movie is amazing, this art book is amazing. Ugh now I wanna rewatch the movie again, but I literally just did... 🤷🏻♀ This movie is amazing, this art book is amazing. Ugh now I wanna rewatch the movie again, but I literally just did... 🤷🏻‍♀️

  28. 5 out of 5

    Steven Shinder

    This was a visually pleasing glimpse into the evolution of Rogue One's characters and settings. There are even a couple of alien rebel character designs that I hope resurface in something else.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    I loved the movie so it was great to see all the concept art! A must for any Star Wars fan!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

    Review to come. Rating - 4/5

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