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The Monster at the End of this Book

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Many adults name this book as their favorite Little Golden Book. Generations of kids have interacted with lovable, furry old Grover as he begs the reader not to turn the page—for fear of a monster at the end of the book. “Oh, I am so embarrassed,” he says on the last page . . . for, of course, the monster is Grover himself! This all-time favorite is now available as a Big Many adults name this book as their favorite Little Golden Book. Generations of kids have interacted with lovable, furry old Grover as he begs the reader not to turn the page—for fear of a monster at the end of the book. “Oh, I am so embarrassed,” he says on the last page . . . for, of course, the monster is Grover himself! This all-time favorite is now available as a Big Little Golden Book—perfect for lap-time reading.


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Many adults name this book as their favorite Little Golden Book. Generations of kids have interacted with lovable, furry old Grover as he begs the reader not to turn the page—for fear of a monster at the end of the book. “Oh, I am so embarrassed,” he says on the last page . . . for, of course, the monster is Grover himself! This all-time favorite is now available as a Big Many adults name this book as their favorite Little Golden Book. Generations of kids have interacted with lovable, furry old Grover as he begs the reader not to turn the page—for fear of a monster at the end of the book. “Oh, I am so embarrassed,” he says on the last page . . . for, of course, the monster is Grover himself! This all-time favorite is now available as a Big Little Golden Book—perfect for lap-time reading.

30 review for The Monster at the End of this Book

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    I had a very love/hate relationship with The Muppets in my early youth. I really, really liked watching "The Muppet Show" and "Sesame Street". They were two of my favorite shows, and I still hold both in high regard. However, every now and then and completely out of nowhere, a Muppet would do something that genuinely terrified me. For example, I really hated that old "Sesame" sketch when a couple of mild-mannered puppets would calmly take turns whispering words that rhymed to a gently jazzy beat I had a very love/hate relationship with The Muppets in my early youth. I really, really liked watching "The Muppet Show" and "Sesame Street". They were two of my favorite shows, and I still hold both in high regard. However, every now and then and completely out of nowhere, a Muppet would do something that genuinely terrified me. For example, I really hated that old "Sesame" sketch when a couple of mild-mannered puppets would calmly take turns whispering words that rhymed to a gently jazzy beat, and then this orange hairy guy would barrel up to the screen, and, without regard for rhythm or personal space, bellow an unwieldy sentence containing all the words the less-horrific Muppets had so charmingly whispered earlier. That SCARED me. Badly. I was scared of beards, yelling, and any pictures or toys depicting someone or something with a gaping mouth. Thus, I had serious issues with "Monster at the End of this Book". I was always very ill at ease with Grover, anyway. He caused terrible problems for everyone he encountered, and almost never showed remorse. Also, he couldn't seem to communicate without shouting and gesticulating wildly. I had real problems with the way he carried himself, so I knew going into the book that I probably wasn't going to like it much. What I didn't expect was to be profoundly affected, to the point of tears and sleepless nights, by a drawing of Grover, his furry mouth so wide with terror that his head resembled a blubbering halved blue grapefruit, positively out of control with horror and dread concerning the MONSTER that was about to destroy him, to destroy us all, because he'd spoken to me, personally, directly, about the effects the very book I held in my hands would have on the both of us in the immediate future. I never appreciated or even detected the pleasingly ironic denouement of this, the most devious Little Golden Book of them all, until 4th or 5th grade, when I finally dared to finish the thing. In my preschool days, as far as I was concerned, they may as well have entitled the book "Grover Undergoes a Harrowing Mental Breakdown, and Will Implore You to Help Him Throughout (You Cannot)". One star, one scar.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    This was one of my all-time favorite books when I was a kid. In the story, Grover begs the reader to stop turning pages because each page brings us closer to a monster at the end of the book, and Grover is afraid of monsters. He tries to nail the pages shut, he tries to tie the pages down, he even builds a brick wall. But somehow the reader always turns the page. My mother used to read this book to me, and she was great at doing funny voices. I remember laughing so hard as she acted out Grover b This was one of my all-time favorite books when I was a kid. In the story, Grover begs the reader to stop turning pages because each page brings us closer to a monster at the end of the book, and Grover is afraid of monsters. He tries to nail the pages shut, he tries to tie the pages down, he even builds a brick wall. But somehow the reader always turns the page. My mother used to read this book to me, and she was great at doing funny voices. I remember laughing so hard as she acted out Grover becoming more and more hysterical about the monster at the end of the book. (Children's Spoiler Alert: There is a monster, but he is a friendly one.) Somewhere on a flash drive I have a video of my mom reading this story. A few years ago, I showed her the book and asked if I could record her reading it. She performed it perfectly, and it was a beautiful scene. I have so many happy memories of my mother reading to me before bedtime. I am grateful for this book and for those memories. My sweet, brilliant mother. It is tragic that her brain has now been so damaged by cancer that she has trouble speaking and reading, but cancer can't rob me of those times. Like Grover, I wish I could nail down some boards or build a brick wall to try and stop what is inevitable. I just hope there will be some friends there to help me through the scary parts. November 1, 2015

  3. 4 out of 5

    Raizel

    Riveting. Gave me goose bumps. A true page turner till the end.

  4. 4 out of 5

    s.penkevich

    This book was a childhood favorite of mine, and I suspect that my love of metafiction stems from this book. However, as an adult I find this book to be slightly sadistic. Grover BEGS you to not turn the page in order to keep from reaching the monster that will be found on the final page ((view spoiler)[The monster turns out to be 'lovable furry old' Grover himself (hide spoiler)] ), building brick walls and such to thwart your progress. However, the fun is laughing at Grover as you ignore his ple This book was a childhood favorite of mine, and I suspect that my love of metafiction stems from this book. However, as an adult I find this book to be slightly sadistic. Grover BEGS you to not turn the page in order to keep from reaching the monster that will be found on the final page ((view spoiler)[The monster turns out to be 'lovable furry old' Grover himself (hide spoiler)] ), building brick walls and such to thwart your progress. However, the fun is laughing at Grover as you ignore his pleas and keep on pushing forward to the end. Perhaps the positive message is to be brave and face your fears though. Either way, this is a fun book and an interesting example of how reader and book can interact. It has become a staple of my own daughters bedtimes. Highly recommended if you have young children. Other titles to check out are the sequel, Another Monster at the End of This Book or Hide and Seek: with Lovable, Furry Old Grover (Pictureback

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    ‘Oh great,’ you’re thinking, ‘another witty endeavor where a Goodreader reflects back on a childhood favorite. Oh joy.' Well, suck it up and deal. A-hem… While rifling through the book section at my local Goodwill; I came across this little gem. Copyright 1980, Little Golden Books® edition complete with all our favorite characters outlining the back cover… The Tawny Scrawny Lion, Tootle, The Poky Little Puppy… that famous gold-foil binding (seriously, it says so… right on the back!) A little girl ‘Oh great,’ you’re thinking, ‘another witty endeavor where a Goodreader reflects back on a childhood favorite. Oh joy.' Well, suck it up and deal. A-hem… While rifling through the book section at my local Goodwill; I came across this little gem. Copyright 1980, Little Golden Books® edition complete with all our favorite characters outlining the back cover… The Tawny Scrawny Lion, Tootle, The Poky Little Puppy… that famous gold-foil binding (seriously, it says so… right on the back!) A little girl even signed her name! Natalia (you just know she had one of those stage moms cramming her Airabesques down her throat before a Nutcracker performance... you can just see it...) Anyway… I grabbed this treasure and let out a little yip of delight. God, I LOVED this book! And what a cool edition! So, I paid my 99 cents and skittered on home to *share* with my kids. Bonding! Instant Memories! Up your a**, Norman Rockwell! Clearly, my children have been brainwashed by sponges named Bob and Hedgehogs wearing gloves and little pokey-things. But, I didn’t give up… I found the correct remote(s), shut down all things electronic, sat them down in a semi circle at my feet---and with a relish unbeknownst to even myself--- read them this mutha-f**king classic! “So? Huh? Whaddya think? Huh? Well?’ Emily (15): What’s wrong with you? Marley (11): That was weird. Isabel (9): I LOVED it! It was AWESOME! Satchel (5): Can I play the Wii now? Disenchantment. Exasperation. Fail. I reread the book again. I could taste the trust...the anticipation as we defy Grover and turn the page, the tickling blue fur and purple spongy nose that I fell in love with... I could feel it all. Then I read it again. Okay, why is this so endearing to me? I scanned my memory banks… did Mom or Dad read this to me? Hell no.. they never read to me… Was it a beloved teacher? My very own Montambo? Gah… no…. where the hell did I first read this? Was it when I was older and thought it would make me cool to revisit my youthful Sesame Street Days? Could be… sounds a bit cliché for me, but okay… Then I read it again…. This book is freaking mental. I mean throughout the whole book you’re being told that you shouldn’t turn the page because there’s a freaking monster at the end of it. Why do you keep turning the damn page? Is it the font? Is it the colorful print? Is it all the attempts that Grover makes to NOT make you turn the page? Rope and wood and bricks and nails and… Why didn’t this book scare the hell out of me? I’m a nervous Nellie by nature. Why didn’t I throw this book in the basement with the crickets and the Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass albums? Okay, I get it… it’s supposed to teach kids to not judge and to not be afraid and to take a chance. Okay… but after a lifetime of disappointments and negative illuminations… this book leads to an anxiety attack. No double rainbows today.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kirk

    "I . . . am the monster" Grover Monster This is probably one of the most profound statements in literary history to date. Today, there are hundreds of books, films and television shows which address man's incapacity to negotiate his own darkness. In many variations of the tale, we see the darkness within projected outward, cast onto another real or imagined character. Stephen King's Secret Window, even the latest season of Dexter reacquaints us with this age-old phenomenon, but never have they "I . . . am the monster" Grover Monster This is probably one of the most profound statements in literary history to date. Today, there are hundreds of books, films and television shows which address man's incapacity to negotiate his own darkness. In many variations of the tale, we see the darkness within projected outward, cast onto another real or imagined character. Stephen King's Secret Window, even the latest season of Dexter reacquaints us with this age-old phenomenon, but never have they explored it with the depth and finesse author Jon Stone did in the chilling The Monster at the End of this Book. The tale begins with the seemingly lovable Grover, whose ambivalence has yet to be revealed. He fears the monster, an entity which he believes he shares no association with. His dissociation from his own darkness becomes apparent to the reader on the first page when Grover Monster ironically proclaims, "I am so scared of monsters" (Stone). On subsequent pages, Grover's fear grows. But what does he truly fear? Does he fear the monster at the end of the book, or the fact that, upon reaching the end of the book, we will see him for who he truly is? If we align ourselves with the latter of these two possibilities, then the futility of his attempt to hinder our progress is augmented by the fact that even the casual observer can see Grover for what he truly is: a monster. On the other hand, if we believe Grover genuinely fears the monster at the end of the book, the text becomes a testament to identities which have become so fragmented that an individual interprets different facets of the self as separate individuals. The various mechanisms Grover constructs throughout the book follow in the vein of the former of these two possibilities, for it is the industrial era which catalyzed such fragmentation initially, and it is Grover's attempt to reconstruct the industrial mechanism, and his inability to adapt to the requirements of industry, which allow us to finish the text. Over the next few pages, Grover treats the text as a serial killer might treat its victim, binding the book with rope, smothering the book with brick, and building a shack--likely in some remote location--in which he can hide the book away from the public eye. But all of his attempts to slow our progress prove only testament to his inability to adapt to the requirements of the harsh society whose growth is grounded in industry. Even the infantile readers can wretch victory from Grover's grasp simply by turning the pages. By turning the pages we leave him no choice but to identify himself with the only thing he can inherently identify himself as: the monster. Grover's attempts to stop the reader from moving forward are reminiscent of the behaviors we all exhibit when trying to hide our darkest impulses. We try to box ourselves off from others, or "put up a wall." These very counterintuitive impulses are often what give us away. It is the hiding that reveals us. While this text could be said to be a grim portrayal of our own fears and impulses, it ends on a positive note. Grover learns to embrace the monster within, and realizes that it is a benign force once refutation of its existence comes to an end, showing us that we all must accept the darkness within, for repression can only result in physiological complications and self-inflicted damage that far outweighs what we might perceive our inner demons to be capable of. The final message left to readers is best encapsulated by Grover's closing statement, "I told you and told you there was nothing to be afraid of." (Stone).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    A favorite in my household! :)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Top 8 Most Shocking Twists In Literature 8. Wasp Factory by Iain Banks 7. We Have Always Lived In The Castle by Shirley jackson 6. The Castle by Kafka (Twist ending: the guy dies! No, not that guy. Kafka. Like mid-sentence.) 5. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie 4. Money: A Suicide Note by Martin Amis 3. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (Reader, you what? Why?) 2. Borges, especially most of The Aleph 1. The monster at the end of this book A metafictional analysis of the crushing dichotomy betwee Top 8 Most Shocking Twists In Literature 8. Wasp Factory by Iain Banks 7. We Have Always Lived In The Castle by Shirley jackson 6. The Castle by Kafka (Twist ending: the guy dies! No, not that guy. Kafka. Like mid-sentence.) 5. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie 4. Money: A Suicide Note by Martin Amis 3. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (Reader, you what? Why?) 2. Borges, especially most of The Aleph 1. The monster at the end of this book A metafictional analysis of the crushing dichotomy between who we want to be and who we really are, this book contains the entire agony of a disillusioned life in its chained pages. Stone's avatar is, cleverly, an idol of our youth, the inexplicable Grover. We find him in his youthful idealism, vowing to keep the monster he feels lurking in the world around him at bay. We track him through his heroic efforts to beat fate itself. We feel the inevitability of his defeat - the ending is writ in the title. But this is our childhood champion, our Super Grover! How can he lose? We expect a twist ending. Surely, he cannot fail. And then: the twist comes, but it's the twist of a dagger, as our protagonist realizes that he himself has always been the very thing he most fears. He is the monster. You are the monster. We...we are all the monster.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    I bought this for my grandbaby, in the interest of getting him away from electronics and into real books. We read it 4 times in the first sitting. Even then I had to cut him off so he could go home and get to bed.... #Win

  10. 5 out of 5

    Steven Stark

    This book starts out great! I love Grover. The problem is that Grover asks you to not turn any more pages, because of his belief that there is a monster at the end of the book. I decided to honor Grover's wish. Oh, I turned a few pages. But when Grover took the time to tie all the pages together to discourage me from turning any more, well, I just didn't have the heart to go on. The little guy was really scared. But I can't help but think.....are all monsters necessarily bad? You know it's funny - This book starts out great! I love Grover. The problem is that Grover asks you to not turn any more pages, because of his belief that there is a monster at the end of the book. I decided to honor Grover's wish. Oh, I turned a few pages. But when Grover took the time to tie all the pages together to discourage me from turning any more, well, I just didn't have the heart to go on. The little guy was really scared. But I can't help but think.....are all monsters necessarily bad? You know it's funny - one could ALMOST consider Grover himself to be a type of monster..... Well, it's not for me to decide now. I chose to respect Grover's feelings.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sophia Triad

    If you want to see your little ones not being able to stop giggling every time you dare to turn a page; then you need to get this book. Besides the beautiful words by Jon Stone, there are also these beautiful illustrations by Michael Smollin. I have to say that if a book is good, it doesn't really matter when it was published. It can be popular and successful for ever. This is our new favourite book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cyndi

    This is a book that I read hundreds of times to my kids. It is so much fun! But, as a Gran, what I really love is hearing my daughter read it to her little boy with the same voices and inflections I used when I read it to her. Generations of readers!😊

  13. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    We are the monster we fear. We are also the monster that induces fear in others, sometimes by an act as simple as turning a page. The reader is the author of meaning. Simply existing and acting causes ripples in the realities of others which we are incapable of comprehending. When you pick up a stone, the earth is lighter. When you turn the page, you are one moment closer to your own death. Not turning the page will not make the monster at the end of this book dissapear either, he will never go away We are the monster we fear. We are also the monster that induces fear in others, sometimes by an act as simple as turning a page. The reader is the author of meaning. Simply existing and acting causes ripples in the realities of others which we are incapable of comprehending. When you pick up a stone, the earth is lighter. When you turn the page, you are one moment closer to your own death. Not turning the page will not make the monster at the end of this book dissapear either, he will never go away. He is you.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    I do an ass kicking impersonation of Grover. Just ask my kids. Actually, I can do any of the Muppets voiced by Frank Oz -- Miss Piggy, Fozzie, Sam the Eagle, Cookie Monster, Bert, even Yoda (which is my son's fave), but Grover is my best. So when I was looking for a book for my little Scoutie a couple of months ago, something that I could hide away and save for just her and me, and I stumbled upon a little board book version of this Little Golden Book classic, I had to have it. I'd forgotten all I do an ass kicking impersonation of Grover. Just ask my kids. Actually, I can do any of the Muppets voiced by Frank Oz -- Miss Piggy, Fozzie, Sam the Eagle, Cookie Monster, Bert, even Yoda (which is my son's fave), but Grover is my best. So when I was looking for a book for my little Scoutie a couple of months ago, something that I could hide away and save for just her and me, and I stumbled upon a little board book version of this Little Golden Book classic, I had to have it. I'd forgotten all about it, but when I was a little kid this was one of my favourite books. When our twins came, and even when they started to like classic Sesame Street (they've still never seen an episode with Elmo and Zoe, or anything post 1979 ... what a proud Papa I am!), this book never crossed my mind. But when I saw the lone copy sitting up on that shelf, I snatched it and headed for the cashier. As soon as I was in my car, I had the book out and I read it out loud, as Grover, to myself. I love this book because Scoutie loves to hear me read it to her, and who doesn't love to have their babe waddle up with her favourite book in hand before climbing awkwardly onto your lap and saying "wead!"? I love this book because it reminds me that I was once a little we babe crawling up onto my Mom's lap so she could read it to me. I love this book because Grover is, for me, the most magical Sesame Street Muppet. But mostly I love this book because I love this book. It is clever and cute and fun, which is exactly what Grover is. If you've never read this yourself, you should. And if you have kids and haven't read it to them, you must.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    (4/23/09) I saw a quote from this book on my friend Misha's profile last night and a flood of good feelings came rushing over me. While I don't remember the specifics of the story (other than the surprise ending!), I do remember reading it a hundred thousand times. I remember the golden spine, a different texture than the rest of the hard cover. I remember, that maybe, years later, the dog chewed the corner. And I remember loving this book a lot. Funny, as I think about it now, I wonder why I've (4/23/09) I saw a quote from this book on my friend Misha's profile last night and a flood of good feelings came rushing over me. While I don't remember the specifics of the story (other than the surprise ending!), I do remember reading it a hundred thousand times. I remember the golden spine, a different texture than the rest of the hard cover. I remember, that maybe, years later, the dog chewed the corner. And I remember loving this book a lot. Funny, as I think about it now, I wonder why I've lived such a fearful life. Doesn't this book teach us that sometimes our fears are blown way out of proportion? Or maybe it teaches us, that we, ourselves, are our own worst nightmares; that I am the monster at the end of my own book. How scary is that...?

  16. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    The creativity of author Jon Stone in this brief story is remarkable, and it is one of the earliest picture books I remember fully appreciating for its content. The Monster at the End of This Book has been a staple of my life forever, I think! I love this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rand

    You haven't really read this until you've read it over thirty times in three days to a six year old with severely violent tendencies due to autism.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Staring·Girl

    Το διάβασα με την φωνή του Γκρόβερ 💗

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marie Antoinette

    What can i say? Classics never die! It's time to be a kid again. The first time i read this book i was 8 years old, it was a birthday present from my parents, i was so happy because i loved Sesame Street, Who doesn't love S.S when they are kids right? The most amazing thing about this book is that Grover is trying to stop us from reaching the end of the book, where he knows there is a monster and when we are kids we love to be scared because deep down, we know we are in no real danger. So we tur What can i say? Classics never die! It's time to be a kid again. The first time i read this book i was 8 years old, it was a birthday present from my parents, i was so happy because i loved Sesame Street, Who doesn't love S.S when they are kids right? The most amazing thing about this book is that Grover is trying to stop us from reaching the end of the book, where he knows there is a monster and when we are kids we love to be scared because deep down, we know we are in no real danger. So we turn page after page even when Grover beg us to stop, page after page until we reach the end. And then it turns out that the monster at the end of the book is Grover himself. It was very funny when i was 8 years old. Last week digging through my old stuff, I found my old copy of this book so naturally I started to read it , it was all fun and games until it wasn't, because now that I'm older I think really understand the meaning of this book... Often we live our lives afraid of the monster under the bed without knowing that the monster is us. We are only afraid of ourselves.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This is my youngest daughter’s “most favoritest book” and to be honest, it is a joy to read it with her… every night… until she finds another favoritest book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Rodda

    Such fun to read. I loved this as a child and my kids enjoy this too. One you can read over and over.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    Tonight my niece went old school. She wanted the old Golden Books. This was a cute fun little book. Don't turn the Page. Good for preschool age.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jentry

    One of the best!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Damian

    This book is perfect for your 2-4 year old. It gives your child permission to disobey important instructions from cute, loveable Grover (who could whoop Elmo in a Sesame street fight). The book grabs your attention from the very first line, with Grover teasing your child's curiosity about a potential monster at the end of the book, all the while begging your child NOT to turn the page. And yet we encourage the child to do it anyway. This "cute-for-now" moment will be stored in your child's memor This book is perfect for your 2-4 year old. It gives your child permission to disobey important instructions from cute, loveable Grover (who could whoop Elmo in a Sesame street fight). The book grabs your attention from the very first line, with Grover teasing your child's curiosity about a potential monster at the end of the book, all the while begging your child NOT to turn the page. And yet we encourage the child to do it anyway. This "cute-for-now" moment will be stored in your child's memory and, eventually, come back to haunt you when you tell the child NOT to do something and they do it anyway; all the while giggling about how much fun it is to rebel against orders and society as a whole. And can you blame them? After all, you created the monster, and here's a newsflash...it's not at the end of this book, it's in the bathroom making its fourth attempt to flush a sock down the toilet after you told them not to. Enjoy!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    I am impatiently anticipating the exciting moment when I can read this book aloud to my daughter. One of my favorites of the many Golden Books that I cherished as a kid, "The Monster at the End of this Book" by Jon Stone is a perfect, fun little story that taught me the joys of suspense and patience, as my mother used to gleefully take her time turning the pages, while I wiggled with joyous excitement until the last page which, of course (***spoiler alert!***), revealed that the monster was none I am impatiently anticipating the exciting moment when I can read this book aloud to my daughter. One of my favorites of the many Golden Books that I cherished as a kid, "The Monster at the End of this Book" by Jon Stone is a perfect, fun little story that taught me the joys of suspense and patience, as my mother used to gleefully take her time turning the pages, while I wiggled with joyous excitement until the last page which, of course (***spoiler alert!***), revealed that the monster was none other than cute, lovable Grover! Having your first kid is a nerve-wracking and exciting time, but it's also a wonderful time to revisit some of your own fond memories of childhood. Not surprisingly, most of mine involved books. So, indulge me if you will while I wax nostalgic in the next couple months until the birth of my little girl, as I will probably be posting several reviews of some of my favorite children's book classics.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    This is absolutely my favorite book of all time. I really can't remember when I first read it so I just guessed. I have always loved Grover as long as I can remember. It is such a clever and fun book, and while it does kind of play on kids' little rebellious streaks (turning the pages when Grover is trying everything in his power to get the reader not to), it also incites kids to keep reading all the way to the end, to finish what you start, to foster a healthy sense of curiosity, and even to no This is absolutely my favorite book of all time. I really can't remember when I first read it so I just guessed. I have always loved Grover as long as I can remember. It is such a clever and fun book, and while it does kind of play on kids' little rebellious streaks (turning the pages when Grover is trying everything in his power to get the reader not to), it also incites kids to keep reading all the way to the end, to finish what you start, to foster a healthy sense of curiosity, and even to not be so afraid of something that you shouldn't really be afraid of. (So many levels to look into here! haha Never even really thought about that before! I just love the book!) Definitely a highly recommended read for young and old alike!! :)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristie

    I read this book to my children when they were young. It is very funny. The whole book is basically Grover trying to stop you from getting to the end of the book because there is a monster there and he is afraid of monsters. I remember my girls giggling every time they turned a page and ruined his plans to stop them. :)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Avis Black

    This was the very first book I ever bought with my own money, me being the age of seven, and I remember the whole event as being almost frighteningly grown-up, to actually buy a book. I also annoyed the crap out of my parents by making them read it to me repeatedly. Loved it at the time.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    This was already one of my most favorite books in the entire world. Then I used it to close a monster-themed storytime (10/10/17). When I finished the book, a rapt four-year-old boy in the audience yelled, "READ THAT AGAIN!" <3 <3 <3 Best librarian moment ever.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Len Evans Jr

    This was my youngest sisters favorite book when she was little. She is 5 years younger than me, so when she was born I was fascinated by her and wanted to help my Mom take care of her. I must have read this book to her a 1000 times or more, she never got tired of it. Saw it on Amazon and just had to buy it. Awesome book!

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